Simplicity 8093 and 1366: DIY Wide Leg Cropped Trousers Pants and Boxy Orange Linen Top

Simplicity 8093 and 1366: DIY Wide Leg Cropped Trousers Pants and Boxy Orange Linen Top

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Simplicity 8093 and 1366: DIY Wide Leg Cropped Trousers Pants and Boxy Orange Linen Top

Hi Friends,

The weather is not being very cooperative with photographing summer clothes, but hey ho, we must press on. Today I am sharing a pair of wide leg cropped trousers (or pants for some) made using Simplicity 8093 and a boxy top in the brightest orange linen made using Simplicity 1366. Let’s start with the trousers.

Simplicity 8093 is a Mimi G for Simplicity pattern. It is the first time I have used one of these patterns. Included in the envelope are also pattern pieces to make a jacket with a notched detail collar and a top. I was very kindly provided the pattern and also the fabric I used to make these trousers by Sew Essential. The fabric I chose is to use is their Prestige Medium Weight Crepe, in navy blue. This fabric is easy to wash, sew and press (I used my press cloth and my clapper in parts) and overlocked seams. It’s a great quality fabric and perfect for trousers like these.

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Simplicity 8093 and 1366: DIY Wide Leg Cropped Trousers Pants and Boxy Orange Linen Top


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Simplicity 8093 and 1366: DIY Wide Leg Cropped Trousers Pants and Boxy Orange Linen Top

Full review for the trousers below but one thing I wanted to point out was that these trousers feature an invisible zipper which is placed in the seam alongside an in-seam pocket. What?! Did you even know such a thing was possible? Nope, neither did I until I came to making these. (p.s. I know the seam intersection is about 0.25 inches off here, but I was just too amazed to unpick and re-do!)

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Simplicity 8093: wide leg cropped trousers: invisible zipper inserted in to seam with in-seam pocket

There is a full (free) video tutorial sew-along for these trousers, hosted by Mimi G, so if you want to see how this magic is done watch the video.

Simplicity 8093 Pattern Review

Pattern Description:
Pattern includes V-neck top, cropped wide-leg pants, and lined jacket with notched detail.

I made view B, the cropped wide-leg pants.
Pattern Sizing:
6 – 24
Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?
Yes
Were the instructions easy to follow?
Yes they were, although I had to refer to the (free) Mimi G video tutorial sew along for these pants to work out how to do the invisible zipper, which is inserted in to the side seam alongside an in-seam pocket. Clever stuff.
What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?
This is a new silhouette for me. I think I like it. I have worn them already and was complimented on them. TBH I think when I wore them out I wore them with a tucked in silk blouse and maybe that looked neater than the untucked top I am wearing them with in these photos. You can see how I wore them out on my instagram here. I love the invisible zipper/ pocket detail. Nothing to dislike as such.
Fabric Used:
Prestige medium weight crepe in navy blue, supplied by Sew Essential UK.
Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:
My only adjustment was to take a 1 inch tuck from the back yoke and re-add this to the back hem. I am no trouser fitting expert and whilst the yoke now fits me well, it has caused the trousers to pitch forward slightly. I don’t know if I should have taken the 1 inch from the top of the trousers (and deepened the back crotch by 1 inch?)

I ended up removing 4.5 inches from the length.Shortys beware.

I didn’t finish the yoke facing as instructed and instead turned over the raw edge and machined in the ditch to close.
Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?
Maybe and yes.
Conclusion:

I am surprised at how much I do like wearing these and am totally freaked out about the invisible zipper:-) Dress these pants up or down. Either way they are comfortable and have that classy tailored look too.

Now the top. Simplicity 1366 is a Cynthia Rowley pattern, that also includes a skirt and a camisole. (Interestingly the camisole has a facing if you prefer that finish to doing a narrow hem or bias tape finish). Anyway, I have seen some great versions of this top and I wanted to try it out. The bright orange linen was purchased from my local covered market. I love the colour and can’t wait to wear it on holiday.

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Simplicity 8093 and 1366: DIY Wide Leg Cropped Trousers Pants and Boxy Orange Linen Top

Simplicity 1366 Pattern Review

Pattern Description:
High low cascading bow skirt in two lengths. Pattern also includes tank with spaghetti straps and loose fitting short sleeve top.

I made view D.
Pattern Sizing:
4 – 20
Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?
Yes.
Were the instructions easy to follow?
Yes.
What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?
I do love the finished top. Nothing to dislike.
Fabric Used:
Irish linen.
Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:
1 inch sway back adjustment.

Added 1.25 inches to the length.

1.25 inches full arm adjustment.

Cheaters FBA: Added 2 inches to the side seams, front and back, tapering to nothing at the armholes.
Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?
Yes, I can see me making this again. Yes, I recommend.
Conclusion:

It is loose and boxy and perfect for hot weather dressing. If you want a dartless top pattern try this one out.

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Simplicity 8093 and 1366: DIY Wide Leg Cropped Trousers Pants and Boxy Orange Linen Top

Thanks once again to Sew Essential for being so generous and giving me the opportunity to select the pattern and fabric.

Until soon!

 

 

Fabric shopping in NYC and a Linton Tweeds Meet Up

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Hello Friends,

Two things today:

  1. I am going to have a whole day to do some fabric shopping in NYC on our forthcoming trip to The States. I am thinking of heading to Paron Fabrics for 10:30am on Wednesday 20th July. From there I was thinking of Chic Fabric, but have just been informed that it no longer exists. So…maybe after Paron’s then Metro Textiles/ Spandex House and Pacific Trims? This is all completely loose, as I haven’t even checked how close things are to each other (any experts feel free to chime in!) In the afternoon if I have any energy/ money/ space in my luggage left, then try for Mood fabrics? So if anyone is feeling jobless on that particular Wednesday and would like to join me please leave me a comment below or PM me (my email address is under my “about me” section.
  2. A couple of people have mentioned they would like to come visit Linton Tweeds. I am proposing a meet-up there on Saturday 17th September. At this stage this is just to guage interest. I have contacted Linton Tweeds asking if they might be able to organise anything for us (like a tour of the production side/ a talk or something), but, till now, have not heard anything. So it might just be a chance to pet the fabrics (and add to your stash), but more than that, meet other folks with a shared interest in sewing, eat some lunch and enjoy some sewing related craic. I will put out more details nearer the time but everyone is welcome.

Until soon. Enjoy the weekend.

 

Custom Woven Clothing Labels from Dutch Label Shop

Custom woven clothing labels from Dutch Label Shop
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Custom woven clothing labels from Dutch Label Shop

Hey Friends,

Some time ago I was contacted by a representative from an American company called Dutch Label Shop asking if I wanted to try some of their custom woven clothing labels. This company specialises in manufacturing high-quality, customised woven labels in quantities as small as 30, which makes it a cost effect solution for individual users (like me!) as well as emerging smaller sized brands. The labels were provided to me on a complimentary basis, with an invitation for me to blog about my experience if I wanted. So here is my honest review.

As far as my personal interests were concerned there were two relevant options open to me: basic woven labels or woven logo labels (the latter option being the one that I took). That’s not to say that I wasn’t tempted by the basic woven labels, because I was. If you check out the pre-loaded symbol options with the basic woven labels you will see there is a sewing (and fashion) category, with loads of very cute symbols like a reel of thread, scissors, buttons, a tape measure, a dress form etc. If you chose to use this option I guarantee it is super easy and fast to create your own basic woven labels with your own wording included.

Anyway, the reason that I went with the woven logo labels was that you have a greater choice of label type (I went for the centre fold just because I often prefer my labels to be placed more discretely in a side seam and this way I can have them in a side or neck seam). Example below:

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McCalls 7058 White Cropped Linton Tweed Boucle Jacket – side view – inside lining – custom woven clothing label from The Dutch Label Shop

Creating my woven logo labels was very simple using The Dutch Label Shop’s website. It’s pretty idiot-proof with a good selection of options, including label type and size, label and logo colours and sew on or iron on options. There is also a “preserve light background” option which weaves an additional layer of white thread into your label to vibrantly brighten the background color, and prevent shine-through. As my labels featured a light background with a black logo I included this option and I have no complaints.

In terms of quality, the labels I went for have a very luxurious feel to them. They are heavy and thick and really add that special finishing touch to my handmade garments. 200 labels came to just under $100USD (excluding shipping) and I think that’s pretty good value for money. I also have to really compliment the Dutch Label Shop customer service team because they really were brilliant. They checked my label and answered all my questions.

In conclusion, I love my new labels. I wouldn’t recommend them to you if I didn’t. I am very grateful to The Dutch Label Shop for giving me the opportunity to try their labels out, and if any of my readers fancies trying them out for themselves then there is a discount code which you can enter at the checkout, active for the next 30 days: sewmanju. That code will get you 15% off.

Be back soon!

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Custom woven clothing labels from Dutch Label Shop

 

 

McCalls 7058 and Grainline Archer: DIY White Linton Tweed Boucle Cropped Jacket and Striped Linen Shirt

McCalls 7058 White Cropped Linton Tweed Boucle Jacket, worn with Striped Linen Grainline Archer shirt.
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McCalls 7058 White Cropped Linton Tweed Boucle Jacket, worn with Striped Linen Grainline Archer shirt.

Hey Friends,

I have mentioned before that I live very close (about 25 minutes drive since moving?) from Linton Tweeds in Carlisle. I don’t actually go there very often (although they do a mean lemon meringue pie :-)), and I have yet to purchase any fabric from a roll. What they do have is pre-cut 1 metre skirt lengths for substantially less than the roll price, often with an offer if you buy 2 at the same time. So in my stash I have a few pieces of Linton Tweed fabric in skirt lengths.

What I have realised is that buying these skirt lengths is, for me, not that useful. I don’t make skirts from them, and for me, I probably need more than a one metre length to cut a decent jacket from. But I had two skirt lengths of this white boucle and determined to make something from it I set off. Here’s a close up of the fabric because it is hard to see the beautiful texture in the photographs (sorry the outdoor shots were taken early one cloudy morning):

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McCalls 7058 White Cropped Linton Tweed Boucle Jacket – close up of fabric texture

I needed a pattern that didn’t require too many pieces. Vogue 7975 was out because, with the two piece sleeves I felt I wouldn’t have enough fabric. I also wanted a fairly quick make which didn’t require a lot of fitting. I eventually decided to make a modified version of McCalls 7058 which I made a winter version of earlier this year. Here’s what it looked like last time to refresh your memories:

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McCalls 7058 Basket Weave Interlined Wool Winter Coat

Here’s my modified version:

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McCalls 7058 White Cropped Linton Tweed Boucle Jacket, worn with Striped Linen Grainline Archer shirt.

Here’s how I approached the sewing and the modifications.

First off, and I don’t recommend this as a general rule for Linton Tweed, I prewashed my fabric. Linton Tweed fabrics are woven using a mixed composition of fibres and if you prewash you do run the risk of ruining your beautiful fabric. But as this fabric didn’t cost me much (less than £15 for both cuts), and I really couldn’t face having a white jacket that wasn’t washable I just went with it, washing it on a gentle cycle with a wool appropriate detergent. It worked out fine. Fabric was unaffected.

Next I block fused my two 1 metre lengths using a light weight weft insertion fusible interfacing. I lined the two selvedge edges up and fused using my press cloth and an iron. Made the fabric much easier to handle as well.

In terms of pattern modifications I:

  • removed 4 inches from the View A cutting line for the body
  • removed 5 inches from the sleeve length
  • removed 1 inch from the centre fronts so there was no overlap

For a full pattern review see my first version.

I wanted a very soft look to the jacket so I kept the tailoring to a minimum. I added a backstay and stabilised the front edges and neckline using twill tape hand stitched in place 0.5 inches from the neck edges and 5/8ths inch from front edges.

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McCalls 7058 Linton Tweed Boucle Jacket – back stay

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McCalls 7058 Linton Tweed Boucle Jacket – stabilising neck and front edges using twill tape.

I added very light shoulder pads and hand stitched all the hems. Here are some pictures on the (too small) dressform. You can see that even though this is a one piece sleeve the elbow dart gives some nice shaping. The jacket is fully lined with a lightweight viscose twill lining.

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McCalls 7058 White Cropped Linton Tweed Boucle Jacket – side view

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McCalls 7058 White Cropped Linton Tweed Boucle Jacket – inside lining – front view

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McCalls 7058 White Cropped Linton Tweed Boucle Jacket – inside lining back view

On this next side lining view you will see a glimpse of my new custom woven clothing labels which were very kindly made for me by Dutch Label Shop – blog post to follow on those.

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McCalls 7058 White Cropped Linton Tweed Boucle Jacket – side view – inside lining

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McCalls 7058 White Cropped Linton Tweed Boucle Jacket, worn with Striped Linen Grainline Archer shirt.

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McCalls 7058 White Cropped Linton Tweed Boucle Jacket, worn with Striped Linen Grainline Archer shirt.

So this is a very plain and simple jacket but I think it will get lots of wear on the cooler days of our great British summer, especially over dresses. I haven’t added any fastenings or trim to this jacket…I did toy with the idea of adding various trims but I figure I can always go back and add something later if I want. I quite like the simplicity of it. It feels so soft and light on, almost like a cardigan.

A brief mention of the shirt. This is version number 5 of Grainline’s Archer shirt. Made in a striped linen that I bought in India. Hard to photograph but lovely to sew, press and wear (although it being linen you have to deal with the creasing!) My only complaint about the Archer pattern is that I don’t like the 0.5 inch seam allowances because it makes flat fell seaming difficult. But it’s worth doing IMO.

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Striped linen Grainline Archer

Have a great weekend and enjoy Father’s Day.

Until soon!

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Striped linen Grainline Archer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Butterick 6182: DIY Sandwashed Silk Boxy Top

Butterick 6182 sandwashed silk boxy top

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Butterick 6182 sandwashed silk boxy top (worn with skirt from same pattern)

Hi Friends,

This here is my second version of Butterick 6182. My first version can be seen here. I have worn the first version quite a bit and I had this smallish length of sandwashed silk in my stash (a rare eBay find!) and I thought it would be nice to make a dressier version to wear out. Incidentally, the skirt I am wearing with the top comes from the same pattern. I don’t love the skirt for some reason but whatevs, I put it on for these photos! (On sewing list: make new denim skirt that I love).

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Butterick 6182 sandwashed silk boxy top (worn with skirt from same pattern)

Not much else to say about this top – I did a review with the first version. The only alterations I made were to add 0.5 inch to either end of the sleeve bands to give myself 1 inch extra around the arms and to drop the armhole opening by 0.5 inch. I french seamed the centre front/ back seams and shoulder seams and serged the side seams/ armhole bands. Here are some inside pictures:

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Butterick 6182 sandwashed silk boxy top – inside – you can just see the french seamed shoulder and centre front seam.


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Butterick 6182 sandwashed silk boxy top – inside – french seamed centre front and should seams and overlocked side seams and armhole bands.

And here is how I wore the top with my white linen twill Butterick 6179 culottes, as shared on my instagram. I wore this outfit last Friday night to a retirement function for my husbands colleague.

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Butterick 6182 sandwashed silk boxy top worn with linen twill butterick 6179 culottes.

This is such a great outfit because it is simple lines done in lux fabrics: breathable, comfortable and stylish. What more could a girl want?

See you soon!

 

McCalls 6988: DIY Floral Stretch Cotton Sheath Dress

McCalls 6988 Floral Stretch Cotton Sheath Dress
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McCalls 6988 Floral Stretch Cotton Sheath Dress

Friends,

We are having some glorious hot weather! It is sunny right now as I type. This makes me happy:-)

So, another sun suitable dress made using McCalls 6988. You can see my first version here. The first version has been worn (sadly to a funeral) and, whilst it is still not in my all time favourites list, I think the bones of the pattern are fundamentally good and so I decided to try it again, this time in a stretch cotton purchased locally to me.

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McCalls 6988 Floral Stretch Cotton Sheath Dress

This time I made view D with a 1 inch full arm adjustment and no other changes (see my first version for full review). Being as this a stretch cotton I was worried about necklines stretching out and so I made sure to staystitch everything, including the facings. The dress is unlined and I just machined the hems.

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McCalls 6988 Floral Stretch Cotton Sheath Dress

This pattern is one of thos multi-cup size patterns, which means separate pattern pieces are included for A – D cup sizes. One thing to note is that these cup sizes are not the same as your regular bra cup sizes and so even though I am normally a G cup in bra fitting, I used the A/B cup for this dress and it fits perfectly through the bust. No FBA required. Just make sure you follow the instructions carefully for measuring and selecting the most appropriate size.

I have got heels on here but I can easily see me wearing this with white pumps or sandals. It is a great piece to dress up or down. My only thought is, do you think I should have pegged the skirt some?

All in all I am super happy with this dress and I can see more in my future. Have a great day!

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McCalls 6988 Floral Stretch Cotton Sheath Dress

 

Vogue 1395: DIY Snake Print Tie Front Dress

Vogue 1395: Snake Print Tie Front Dress

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Vogue 1395: Snake Print Tie Front Dress

Hey There,

Vogue 1395 is a Rebecca Taylor pattern that I have admired since it was released, and have been waiting to make for more than a year. The fabric is a gorgeous quality tencel fabric that I purchased from Remnant Kings in Glasgow last year, with a snakeskin print. The fabric really is wonderful and is probably the only reason this dress hasn’t been thrown into the recycling bag. It feels so light and cool. Before you ask, this fabric is no longer available. Anywhere. Believe me, I tried. More on that to come.

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Vogue 1395: Snake Print Tie Front Dress

My major issues with the pattern are, firstly, it is far too wide in the shoulders for me. This dress was saved from becoming a complete wadder only because I have made thread chains sewn to tiny press studs which I have sewn to the shoulder seams of the dress (sorry no picture), which loop around my bra straps and are keeping the dress from sliding off my shoulders. My second isse with the pattern is how low the neckline is on me. Fortunately I had this light grey viscose camisole in my drawer which doesn’t look too bad under the dress, but I am somewhat disappointed.

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Vogue 1395: Snake Print Tie Front Dress

Going back to the fabric. I made a rooky mistake when cutting out this dress. I assumed I had enough fabric to cut it (I thought I did?) but it turns out I didn’t. Queue me searching every available source to try and get more fabric. I couldn’t get hold of any for love nor money. In the end, if you look very closely, you will see that I had to put a centre back seam in the skirt and one side of the skirt is made out of three sections of fabric pieced together. Fortunately the print of this fabric is such that it is not too obvious. It doesn’t bother me when I have the dress on.

I did a full bust adjustment on this dress using the method from Fit for Real People for “fronts with cap, cut-on or kimono sleeves”. This added in a side bust dart. Here’s a photograph of what I did on my instagram feed.

*Edited to add the only reason I did the FBA was because I felt I needed the length in the bodice front. 

Pattern Review

Pattern Description:
Pullover dress has narrow bias neck and armhole facings, V-neckline, semi-fitted bodice, elasticized waist, attached, single-layered overlay (wrong side shows) extending into tie ends with gathered back neckline, lined skirt, cap sleeves and very narrow hems.
Pattern Sizing:
8 – 24
Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?
Yes…but the model doesn’t look like she is having issues with the depth of the neckline or the width of the shoulders or showing the sides of her bra off.
Were the instructions easy to follow?
Yes.
What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?
As mentioned above, and this is obviously unique to me (and other people with my build) but things I dislike:

The dress is too wide in the shoulders. I have made thread carriers sewn to tiny press studs which I have sewn to the shoulder seams and loop around my bra straps and stop the dress from sliding off my shoulders. It’s saved it but it’s not ideal.

The neckline is too low. I will only wear this dress with a camisole which I generally dislike, but in this case I will make an exception.

Be prepared to show all the sides of your bra wearing this dress (plenty of other reviewers have also mentioned this). Again, camisole.

I thought the seam allowances used to create the casing for the elastic were too narrow and next time I would make these a bit wider especially if working with easily fraying fabrics.

What do I like: hmmm….my fabric.
Fabric Used:
Wonderful quality tencel. Feels beautiful to wear.
Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:
1 inch sway back adjustment on the skirt and added the removed 1 inch back to the bottom of the skirt.

1 inch FBA using method from Fit for Real People for “fronts with cap, cut-on or kimono sleeves”. This added in a side bust dart. You can see a picture of how I did this on my instagram feed.

Lengthened skirt by 2 inches.

Attempted to raise armholes by 0.5 inches but if there was a next time I would probably add about 2.5 inches.
Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?
I don’t know.  I recommend but with the caution be prepared to make modifications.
Conclusion:

I want to love this dress and I have already worn it but I don’t know if I can overcome the disappointment to make changes to a future version. Time’s a healer:-)

If you have had a long weekend hope you have enjoyed it. See you soon!

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Vogue 1395: Snake Print Tie Front Dress

Pauline Alice Reina Shirt:DIY Button Front Tie Neck Blouse

Pauline Alice Reina Button Front Tie Neck Blouse
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Pauline Alice Reina Button Front Tie Neck Blouse – worn with Butterick 6179 culottes

Hi Friends,

A little while ago Pauline Alice asked me if I would be interested in testing her latest shirt pattern: the Reina shirt.

The Reina shirt is described as “romantic and feminine. It flares out slightly at the bottom with a longer back. Gathered at the front and back, [lots of] loops for fastenings and deep V-neckline”.

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Pauline Alice Reina Button Front Tie Neck Blouse – worn with Butterick 6179 culottes

Here’s the line drawing:

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Pauline Alice Reina Button Front Tie Neck Blouse

You will see there are two views. View A has a tie neck blouse and long, wide sleeves gathered into a contoured cuff. View B has a mandarin collar with short sleeves and pockets.

I ended up doing a mish-mash of both views: I did the tie neck with short sleeves (no pockets).

As I was a pattern tester for this pattern I am not going to do a full review.There were a couple of issues with the blouse (like the depth of the neckline) that Pauline assures me have now been addressed. Be warned there are a lot of button loops to make. There are 15 on my tester version…but truthfully I could do with one more at the top. I didn’t find making the button loops difficult. I used a roleaux loop turner (I am a fan – I know not everyone is) and if you take your time marking and basting, the button loops are fairly easy to do and are a lovely detail.

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Pauline Alice Reina Button Front Tie Neck Blouse

My fabric is a polyester crepe that was purchased from eBay at least a year ago?

In terms of modifications the only things I did were to lengthen the shirt by 4 inches and shorten the sleeves by 4 inches. I french seamed the sides, sleeve seams and sleeves into the armholes.

If you want to see a shot of this blouse (as I wore it today), untucked, then click here to see it in my instagram feed. I have already worn this blouse loads. It is so versatile and makes for effortless dressing. I also like the fact the tie is not too big, but is quite slim.

Pauline has also released two other new patterns today: the Safor skirt and Saler jacket. I am liking the look of the skirt in particular. Together the three patterns are designed almost as a mini-wardrobe.

Overall I do recommend this blouse. I am sure I will make it again in the future…as ever it is a case of waiting for the right fabric to strike my fancy!

Also, my Butterick 6179 culottes have been getting lots of wear! Love them. Would it be boring to make another pair? Navy perhaps?

Have a great weekend!

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Pauline Alice Reina Button Front Tie Neck Blouse – worn with Butterick 6179 culottes

 

 

 

Love Sewing Magazine Bexley Smock Top: DIY Linen High Low Hem Top

Love Sewing Magazine Bexley Smock Top by In The Folds
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Love Sewing Magazine Bexley Smock Top by In The Folds

Hi Friends,

Being perfectly honest with you I don’t generally buy sewing magazines. I am too lazy to trace patterns off and I prefer looking up techniques on line. But I saw a snap of this pattern, The Bexley smock top, on Instagram a few weeks back and I liked the look of it enough to go out and buy the magazine, trace it off, and sew it up.

The pattern can be found in issue 26 of Love Sewing magazine. I believe the pattern itself was created by In the Folds, but, at the moment, the pattern is licensed exclusively to Love Sewing Magazine, so the only way you can get it is through them.

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Love Sewing Magazine Bexley Smock Top by In The Folds

The fabric I used is a checked linen that I bought in India last year. For a bit of added interest I cut the yokes on the bias. In terms of changes I ended up lengthening the top (front and back) by 3.5 inches and slightly widening at the hips. Lengthen/ shorten lines are included, helpfully, on the pattern. It would have been nice to have had a line drawing or at least a shot of the back view but, as this was essentially a free pattern, I won’t complain too much:-)

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Love Sewing Magazine Bexley Smock Top by In The Folds

I also shortened the sleeves by 1 inch and took 5/8ths inch for the hem. The only thing to watch out for is that the neckline binding piece as provided is about half the length it is supposed to. Don’t forget to stay stitch.

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Love Sewing Magazine Bexley Smock Top by In The Folds

Of course my husband declared this had a maternity look to it (pft!) but I have already worn this top and it’s light and breezy and perfect for wearing casually on hot sticky days.

So that’s a quick review of sorts. I find I can never have enough tops in my wardrobe! I am on a mission to add to my summer collection at present.

Until soon,

 

 

 

 

Pauline Alice Eliana Dress Hack: DIY Peasant Boho Tassel Top

Pauline Alice Eliana Dress Hack to Peasant/ Boho Tassel Top
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Pauline Alice Eliana Dress Hack to Peasant/ Boho Tassel Top

Hello Friends,

Last summer I made Pauline Alice’s Eliana dress. It’s a very easy to wear dress, and the elasticated waist gives some definition in that area as well as being comfortable. But, I was not entirely happy with the fit. It basically needed an FBA.

Anyway, flicking through the Boden catalogue I came across a top that I thought I could recreate fairly easily using the Eliana dress as a starting point. Here’s my inspiration picture, as posted on my instagram feed.

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Pauline Alice Eliana Dress Hack to Peasant/ Boho Tassel Top – Inspiration picture

I happened to have a border print viscose in my stash which I thought could work. It meant, like my Vlisco Simplicity 8014 shirt dress, cutting the fabric on the cross grain to take full advantage of the border print. A blog reader (hi, Curls n Skirls, Del) asked about cutting fabric on the cross grain. I would say read this article in Threads which encourages you to look at your fabric and consider cutting on the cross grain to add interest to your garments. What I wanted to say was, when I do chose to cut fabric on the cross grain, I will draw in a new grain line at 90 degrees to the original grain line and use my new grain line to maintain some level of consistency in my cutting out. I know it’s hard to see, but the vertical black biro arrow line below is the new grain line I drew in on one of the Simplicity pattern pieces.

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Cutting fabric on the cross grain: drawing in a new grain line at 90 degrees to the original grain line.

Back to my blouse – the colours in real life are more vibrant than they’ve come out in these pictures. I have already worn this blouse a couple of times since I finished sewing it and it’s cool and comfortable.

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Pauline Alice Eliana Dress Hack to Peasant/ Boho Tassel Top

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Pauline Alice Eliana Dress Hack to Peasant/ Boho Tassel Top

Like the tassel detail? I think it’s a fun detail that takes this top up a notch and totally easy to make following this tutorial. I used one skein of Perle embroidery cotton.

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Pauline Alice Eliana Dress Hack to Peasant/ Boho Tassel Top – Tassel Detail

Here’s the modifications I made to the pattern:

  • Did 1 inch FBA (which introduced a side seam bust dart. In all honesty the dart is probably a little too low and I have moved it up for future use, but it doesn’t affect the fit of this loose blouse).
  • Added 6.5 inches to the length of the dress bodice and shaped the top outwards to accomodate my hips (note to self – only took 3/8ths inch seam allowance at hips).
  • Took a 1 inch tuck out of the bodice back to account for my sway back and added the removed length back to the bottom hem.
  • Shortened the sleeves by 6 inches.
  • Used 1.25 inches for hems.
  • Used 0.25 inch elastic to finish the sleeves.

So that’s a quick and easy blouse which I will enjoy wearing in the warmer months (or could be days…however long this current warm weather spell lasts!)

How is your summer sewing going?

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Pauline Alice Eliana Dress Hack to Peasant/ Boho Tassel Top

 

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