New Look 6970: DIY Baby Dress and Pantaloons Set

New Look 6970 Babies Dress and Pantaloon Two Piece Set
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New Look 6970 Babies Dress and Pantaloon Two Piece Set

Friends,

Whilst STILL waiting for decent weather for outdoor photography (possibly by the weekend/ early next week!) I have wanted to share a baby gift I have just completed. This is a two piece set consisting of a short dress and matching “pantaloons” (New Look’s description, not mine, but as I would rather not attract any more dubious searchers than I already do I am using that description :-)).

The pattern is New Look 6970 and I LOVE it. Not only because it is easy to sew, but there is also the cutest romper/ dungaree option included in it as well. I only wish I had a cute, chubby cheeked baby to photograph it on, but oh well, you are just going to have to squeal over the cuteness of frilly legged pantaloons!

I made views C and D. The bodice part of the dress is self lined so it is cleanly finished inside and no seams to irritate baby. The pantaloons are easy to sew and have casings for the elastic at the waistband and around the legs. I made my own bias binding to use for the leg casings. You don’t have too. I serged whatever seams needed to be. And my set is made in a soft dotted chambray. Note to my husband: girls don’t have to just wear pink!

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New Look 6970 Babies Dress and Pantaloon Two Piece Set

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New Look 6970 Babies Dress and Pantaloon Two Piece Set

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New Look 6970 Babies Dress and Pantaloon Two Piece Set

Sooo cute I can hardly bear to send it away but there you go. It will be sent off for a friends baby girl. I can’t comment on the fit…I will let you know once I find out.

And the little knitted bunny was made by a talented lady in my art class. Is there anything more satifying than an all handmade gift?

Made with love in every careful stitch.

Hopefully back sharing some of my new summer sewing soon….

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Knitted Bunny!

 

 

Butterick 6295 and Greenstyle Lille Racerback Tank: DIY Workout Leggings and Racer Back Tank

Butterick 6295 Leggings and Greenstyle Lille Racerback Tank: DIY Workout Outfit
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Butterick 6295 Leggings and Greenstyle Lille Racerback Tank: DIY Workout Outfit

Hello Friends,

My workout wear was long overdue an update and so I decided to try making some. I know lots of sewists out there make very professional looking workout gear and the number of patterns available to facilitate this has really increased in the last couple of years. I went with Butterick 6295 (a lisette pattern) and, from a new-to-me-pattern-company, the Lille racerback tank (which also has a dress option) from Greenstyle patterns.

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Butterick 6295 Leggings and Greenstyle Lille Racerback Tank: DIY Workout Outfit

I really like both patterns as starting points, but, both need some tweaking. Also, I made the leggings from lycra “stuff” that was in my stash and the tank from a shiny viscose lycra (?), again from stash, and I would really like to make both in proper performance fabrics. I am hopefully going to have a day in Mood Fabrics/ garment district in NYC when we are there in July so maybe I will be able to pick something up then? (BTW it will probably be either 19th or 20th July so if anyone is interested in meeting up, send me an email or leave me a comment. I know its a working day for most so I know the majority of people are going to be busy).

Anyway, as usual, you can check out the full review below, but here are a couple of detail shots.

A close up of the constrast panel at the side leg of the leggings. I went with view D which has ruching up the lower portion of the leg. It’s a neat feature but I think next time I would prefer 3/4 length leggings on me.

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Butterick 6295 Leggings and Greenstyle Lille Racerback Tank: DIY Workout Outfit

The tank is the best fitting workout top I own in the upper body. I love the fact a bra shelf is included and I made mine out of swimsuit lining. But I definitely need to remove some length from the top and maybe I would prefer to size out over the hips a little? Not sure. Also, I cheated and just serged my bands on in this version. The pattern has you actually bind the edges.

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Butterick 6295 Leggings and Greenstyle Lille Racerback Tank: DIY Workout Outfit

Pattern Review Butterick 6295

Pattern Description:
Partially lined, pullover bra top and top have elasticized shoulder strap variations and casing. Purchased bra inserts. B: Built-in bra. Leggings have elasticized waistband, pockets, seam detail, and no side seams. D: Gathered lower sides. C, D: Serge, overcast or regular finish. B, C, D: Stitched hems. All are close-fitting.

I made view D.
Pattern Sizing:
6 – 22
Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?
Yes.
Were the instructions easy to follow?
I essentially completely disregarded the instructions. They have you overlock edges and then overlap seams and stich in order to mimic the finish you see on a lot of RTW gym wear. But I just used standard construction methods on my serger.
What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?
I LOVE the finished garment. The design is ingenious, current and I think the way the concealed waistband is constructed is brilliant. There is nothing to dislike.
Fabric Used:
Polyester lycra? mystery fabrics from my stash.
Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:
I removed 4.5 inches from the length (FYI I am 5’3″: these are LONG).

I omitted the pockets.

I used standard construction techniques on my overlocker.

Next time around I will remove maybe 0.25″ from the inner thighs.
Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?
Yes, if I can pick up some proper performance fabric (maybe on a forthcoming trip to NYC) then I would like to make these again, but probably view C.
Conclusion:

I can only vouch for view D but this is a great pattern IMO.

Pattern Review Greenstyle Lille Racerback Tank

Pattern Description:
This PDF Sewing pattern will be one you go back to time and time again.  Make everything from a workout tank with a built in shelf bra to a maxi dress and everything in between.
Pattern Sizing:
XXS- 3XL
Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?
Yes.
Were the instructions easy to follow?
Yes.
What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?
The PDF is very easy to tape together and there was no cutting/ trimming of edges involved. I LOVE the fact the bra shelf is included and different cutting lines are included for bra sizes up to DDD. Even though the pattern needs some tweaking for me, through the upper body this is the best fitting workout top I own to date. Nothing to dislike.
Fabric Used:
A shiny viscose lycra? fabric that was in my stash.
Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:
I cheated and just serged/ topstitched the bands on at the neckline/ armholes, and didn’t bind them as the pattern instructs. I ended up adding a band at the bottom which was 8 inches deep but next time round I need to remove some length/ do a sway back adjustment and possibly size up over the hips a little more?
Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?
Yes, if I can pick up some proper performance fabric (maybe on a forthcoming trip to NYC) then I would like to make this again.
Conclusion:

This is a very well thought out and designed pattern with a lot of options included.

So, of course I am now frantically sewing items for our trip to the USA. How about you? Any holiday sewing planned? Until soon…

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Butterick 6295 Leggings and Greenstyle Lille Racerback Tank: DIY Workout Outfit

Simplicity 8019 and Jalie 3461 Eleonore Jeans: DIY Real Suede Leather Button Front Skirt and Red Jeggings

Simplicity 8019: Real Suede Leather Button Front Skirt
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Simplicity 8019: Real Suede Leather Button Front Skirt (worn with a new white cotton shirting Archer shirt)

Hello Dear Friends,

It’s been too long! The blasted British weather has meant I have not been able to take any decent blog photographs for ages but today I braved the wind and chill to snap these photos. The lighting was not ideal , and of course, as I type this the sun has come out, but hey ho.

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Simplicity 8019: Real Suede Leather Button Front Skirt

I am totally thrilled with how this skirt has turned out. The pattern is Simplicity 8019, a reissued 70s pattern, and I have made it in the most glorious chestnut brown real suede leather. Really, when I wear this piece I feel very…luxurious. And, oh yes, I made the white cotton shirting Archer shirt as well.

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Simplicity 8019: Real Suede Leather Button Front Skirt

First, let me say that I actually made this pattern up first in some faux suede, as a wearable muslin. Sorry, but you are only going to get a hanger shot of it. Full review below, but what I will say is that this pattern is quite a neat fit at the waist/ high hip/ tummy area. The muslin fits me, but for the real suede version I sized up slightly at the waist/ high hip. If you carry any extra weight in these areas be warned! Now I have made the real suede version of course this faux suede one is just not comparable: it has quite a bit of static and yep, I just don’t love it the way I do the real suede one.

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Simplicity 8019: DIY Faux Suede Button Front Skirt

So, I bought 3 skins of chestnut suede totalling 42 square feet from Le Prevo Leathers in Newcastle, and you can read about my previous epxeriences of sewing with leather in this post here. Pretty much whatever I wrote in that post for sewing and interfacing leather holds true for this suede. I could probably have got away with only buying 2 skins but because of the nap and shape of the pattern pieces I had to go for 3. The snaps on this real suede version were also purchased from Le Prevo.

This real suede version is fully lined in a viscose lining (a remnant from a previous project). I also added hanger loops made from the lining fabric.

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Simplicity 8019: Real Suede Leather Button Front Skirt – full viscose lining

The hem (on the suede) was interfaced and I did a narrow 5/8ths inch hem. I found the deeper hem recommended by the pattern (2 inches) difficult to ease in with the faux suede version and this narrow hem was easier to control. I used specialised leather sewing thread (also bought from Le Prevo) and a stitch length of 4.0 for construction and topstitching.

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Simplicity 8019: Real Suede Leather Button Front Skirt – Hem and lining detail

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Simplicity 8019: Real Suede Leather Button Front Skirt – Snaps and topstitching detail

I FREAKING LOVE MY SKIRT!

Pattern Review

Pattern Description:
These front-gored buttoned skirts from the 1970’s can be made retro with flowy floral prints, or modern in linen or lightweight denim. Skirt can also be made in four lengths. Vintage Simplicity sewing pattern.
Pattern Sizing:
6 – 24
Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?
Yes
Were the instructions easy to follow?
Yes…but there were things I didn’t like. See below.
What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?
I love my final version made in real suede leather. But I made a muslin first (from faux suede) and the fit was slightly off and I didn’t like some aspects of the construction. Nothing to dislike as such. Its a great look.
Fabric Used:
Faux suede for the muslin and real suede leather for the final version lined in viscose lining. I purchased 3 skins of suede totalling 42 square feet. There is a lot of left-over suede but due to the nap and shape of the pattern pieces I could not have got away with just 2 skins.
Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:
I found this pattern to be a neat fit at the waist/ high hips/ tummy area and would recommend making a muslin first if you carry any weight in these areas! For the real suede leather version I sized up slightly at the waist and high hip.

I didn’t like the way the pattern had you put the waist band on first and then finish the button facings. When I made it second time around I did the topstitching on the button facings first and then added my waist band. I also fully lined the skirt on the second version and used snaps rather than buttons.

I found the 2 inch hem hard to ease in on the faux suede version so I removed 2 inches from the length on the real suede leather version and did a narrow 5/8ths inch hem.
Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?
I may make it again…I think it would look great in denim, corduroy or even a flowing viscose for summer. Yes I recommend.
Conclusion:

Love, love, love my final version. It feels so luxurious. I can see me wearing this in the summer with a light top and sandals and with boots and a cropped sweater in the winter. Now I want to sew a wardrobe of things just to wear with it.

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Simplicity 8019: Real Suede Leather Button Front Skirt worn with a new white cotton shirting Archer shirt.

So, I also wanted to share my third pair of Jalie pull on Eleonore jeans. I did’t feel they warranted an entire post of their own. Check out my last pair here. This pair was made exactly the same way except for the fact that I shortened the back elastic by a further 1.5 inches or so. The fit is spot on, but these are made from a cotton/ spandex and personally, I don’t think they are quite as flattering as the black denim ones. They will still get worn, especially when it warms up.

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Jalie 3461 Elenore DIY Pull on Jeans Jeggings.

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Jalie 3461 Elenore DIY Pull on Jeans Jeggings.

What possessed me to wear red and blue I don’t know? Anyway, have a great week ahead and happy sewing!

Until soon…

 

New Look 6217: Kimono Jacket

New Look 6217 Kimono Jacket
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New Look 6217 Kimono Jacket worn with New Look 6225 top

Hi Friends,

I made up a kimono jacket using New Look 6217, view A. This is a very versatile pattern which lets you sew a whole outfit of mix and match pieces if you you wanted too, and I am definitely going to be trying the top from the pattern soon.

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New Look 6217 Kimono Jacket

Don’t be fooled by the apparent sunshine in these photos. It is still far too cold to  be wearing an outfit like this in these parts. But I was just struck with the desire to sew something  fast and easy a couple of weekends ago, and this was the product.

This is some mystery polyester georgette (?) that I found in my stash. It is lightweight with great drape. The only alteration I made to the pattern was to lengthen it by 3 inches.

The colours are a bit washed out in the outdoor shots so here are some on the dressform, and you can also see the facing which finishes off the neckline inside.

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New Look 6217 Kimono Jacket

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New Look 6217 Kimono Jacket

Pattern Review

Pattern Description:
Misses’ kimono style jacket and tee have an easy extended sleeve and bias binding at neckline. Pencil skirt and slim pants have side zip.

This review concerns the kimono style jacket, View A.
Pattern Sizing:
10 – 22
Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?
Yes, although mine is slightly longer
Were the instructions easy to follow?
Yes.
What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?
I love the finished garment, and the shaping at the front. I love the fact it is such a quick and easy piece to sew. Nothing to dislike.
Fabric Used:
A polyester georgette
Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:
The only change I made was to lengthen the jacket by 3 inches.
Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?
I don’t know if I will sew the jacket again (although it would be wonderful made in silk! and would be a great pattern to sew for others), but I want to make the top (view B) soon. I definitely recommend.
Conclusion:

A versatile pattern to have in your collection with lots of possibilities.

Hope you enjoy this Easter weekend however you are spending it. Until soon…

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New Look 6217 Kimono Jacket worn with New Look 6225 top.

 

McCalls 7248, Butterick 6179, Jalie 3461 Eleonore Jeans and McCalls 6886: DIY animal print top, culottes, jeggings and breton top

McCalls 7248 animal print tunic top and Butterick 6179 triple crepe culottes
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McCalls 7248 animal print tunic top and Butterick 6179 triple crepe culottes

Hello Readers!

Today is a bit of a bumper post containing the next 4 items that I sewed up for the wardrobe contest currently running on PR.com. The first thing I have to say is that I am about to cut out item number 7, but I have made a decision that I am not going to rush to complete the remaining 4 items by the end of the month. I am absolutely fine with that, and it is the right decision for me. I have no regrets with what I have sewn up for the contest so far and will still go on to probably sew the remaining garments in my own good time.

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McCalls 7248 animal print tunic top and Butterick 6179 triple crepe culottes

So first up is Butterick 6179, first sewn here. This version is made in a triple crepe and the only alteration I made was to shorten this version by 2 inches compared to the first version. I LOVE these culottes…I know they are not everyones cup of tea…but I just love how I feel when I wear them. Classy, elegant, sophisticated and on trend. Nothing more to say about these.

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McCalls 7248 animal print tunic top and Butterick 6179 triple crepe culottes

The top…now that’s a whole other matter, LOL. The top is McCalls 7248. I had such high hopes for this top, especially after seeing Amanda’s gorgeous version, and really I guess I was hoping this version (made in a polyester georgette) would be a wearable muslin. And it kind of almost is. But, you see, I made a decision to raise the neckline split by 1 inch and I think that 1 little inch has thrown the fit of the whole top off. You can probably see in the pictures it is pulling over the top of my bust from the neckline split.

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McCalls 7248 animal print tunic top and Butterick 6179 triple crepe culottes

If you follow me on instagram you would have seen I initially attached one of the sleeves and it just felt tight right across the tops of the arms and across the back. So I took the sleeve off and added a self bias facing at the armholes and kept it sleeveless. The fit of this top is not perfect and I really don’t know if it is simply down to that 1 inch or something else. I did do an FBA on the pattern and added bust darts before sewing…even in this sleeveless version the armholes are snug (but wearable). Any thoughts? Here’s some pictures of it untucked (I would never wear it like this with the culottes BTW!)…and my review follows.

 

Pattern Review

Pattern Description:

Loose-fitting, pullover tops have front band and pleat, back pleat, Self-lined yoke, and narrow hem. A and B: Bias neck binding and gathers. B, C (button tab) and D: Long sleeves with continuous lap, pleats and button cuffs. Wrong side shows on rolled sleeves C, and longer back hemline B and D. C and D: Neck band.

I made view B with the sleeve tabs from View C and the hem from View D.

Pattern Sizing:

6 – 22

Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?

Erm…kind of. My version is sleeveless.

Were the instructions easy to follow?

For the most part, yes. I did NOT like the instructions for the neck band and did my own thing! First off you are told to staystich the neckline at 0.5 inches from the raw edge, but the neck band is sewn on using a 3/8 inch seam allowance, which means the stay stitching is visible (and therefore had to be unpicked). Secondly, if you follow the instructions fot the neck band I think the pattern has you treat the neck band almost like a bias facing? I didn’t get that. I wanted my neck band to be more visible so I turned the inside edge under and slip stitched it closed.

What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?

See above for a dislike. The fit of my top is off and the main reason I think is due to the fact I raised the neckline slit depth by 1 inch. It seems to have thrown the fit of the whole top off. There are pull lines radiating out from the neckline slit over the top of my bust. Initially I had a sleeve on and it felt tight across the tops of the arms and across the back. I ended up taking the sleeve off and adding a self bias facing to finish the armholes off. I don’t know if dropping the depth back down again will alleviate these problems. Even in this sleeveless version the armholes feel snug.

Fabric Used:

Polyester georgette with animal print.

Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:

Reduced sleeve length by 0.5 inch.

0.5 inch sway back adjustment.

Raised depth of neckline slit by 1 inch (including shortening pattern piece number 2 – front band – by `1 inch).

1 inch FBA, adding in side bust dart.

I interfaced the neck band using a tricot interfacing.

Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?

I don’t know. I think on a smaller busted person this would be a great top.

Conclusion:

Disappointed but that’s the nature of the sewing beast. I will probably still wear this top. When I get over it maybe I will look at this pattern again…or just move on (more likely).

 

Ok, so next we have Jalie 3461 Eleonore pull-on jeans. First time sewn here.

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Jalie 3461 Eleonore jeans and McCalls 6886 modified to breton top

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Jalie 3461 Eleonore jeans and McCalls 6886 modified to breton top

This version is made in 10 oz cotton denim with 2% elastane and they fit and feel much better than the first pair. Changes made:

  • Moved back pocket position down by 0.25 inches
  • Shortened length of leg above knee by 1  inch
  • Slimmed inner thigh down by 0.25 inch
  • Raised crotch by 0.25 inch
  • Reduced rise by 1 inch
  • Reduced depth of waistband by 0.5 inch
  • Lengthened at calf by 3 inches (I like the wrinkled ankle look)
  • I cut the back elastic 1 inch shorter than the front. For the next pair I would make this more like 1.5 inches shorter.

Overall I love them. Very flattering (I think) and I have worn them all day and the denim has not bagged out at all. I have made another pair…next time!

Finally I made a top length version of McCalls 6886 using a striped ponte knit. I added 5/8 inch seam allowance below the bust (could perhaps have even added on a little more for a looser fit?), made the sleeves 3/4 length and added side slits. The neckline is finished using a chambray bias facing. Very neat.

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Jalie 3461 Eleonore jeans and McCalls 6886 modified to breton top

 

Phew! Ok. So, that’s me for today. Where is this year flying away too? Have a great weekend. Until soon…

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Jalie 3461 Eleonore jeans and McCalls 6886 modified to breton top

 

McCalls 6696: DIY Dark Denim Shirtdress

McCalls 6696 DIY Dark Denim Shirtdress
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McCalls 6696 DIY Dark Denim Shirtdress

Hi Friends,

Remember a couple of posts back I outlined my sewing plans to try and enter the PR.com Wardrobe Contest? Well, this is my first item in the contest. Well, it is and it isn’t. First off, I changed my mind about my original plan to sew a denim dress using Vogue 9077. When I looked closer at that particular pattern, I thought it was going to take quite a bit of work to do an FBA. So I decided to go with McCalls 6696: you can see my first version here. Secondly, I have actually sewn 3 other items for the contest already, and am half way through the fifth item. I don’t honestly know if I am going to make the deadline or not (10 items in 2 months is an awful lot!) but there’s still time…

Anyway, back to this version of McCalls 6696. I am just going to go straight to the pattern review below. But I do want to say that I love this version. I tried to distress the (80z) denim somewhat using sandpaper, and for the most part I think it’s worked. I didn’t think I would like slimmer skirt option of this dress, but, surprisingly, I do. Even though this is a casual denim dress I still feel smart and comfortable wearing it.

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McCalls 6696 DIY Dark Denim Shirtdress

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McCalls 6696 DIY Dark Denim Shirtdress

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McCalls 6696 DIY Dark Denim Shirtdress

Pattern Review

Pattern Description:

Dresses have collar, collar band, self-lined yoke back, close-fitting bodice, and band. A: carriers, purchased belt. A, B: pleated skirt, side pockets. A, C: purchased bias tape finishes armholes. D: sleeve bands. C, D: semi-fitted through hips, side front pockets, stitched hems. Bias, close-fitting slip has shoulder straps and very narrow hem. A/B, C, D cup sizes.

Note: I made view D, with the belt tabs from View A, and I also switched the sleeves out for long cuffed sleeves with a continuous lapped placket from Vogue 9077.

Pattern Sizing:

8 – 24. This is one of those multi-cup sized patterns so no need for an FBA.

Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?

Yes, apart from the sleeves.

Were the instructions easy to follow?

Yep.

What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?

I don’t know why it took me so long to make a second version of this dress! Well, maybe I do. There are quite a few pieces that need to be cut, some with interfacing, and quite a few markings that need to be made. But it’s definitely worth it. There is nothing I dislike about this dress. Except maybe the gathers at the back, but I can live with them.

Fabric Used:

8oz denim throughout, including the facings.

Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:

I initially added 1 inch to the length, but ended up removing 1.5 inches from the length in the end.

I did a 1 inch sway back adjustment on the back bodice.

I had to cut the yoke on the cross grain due to fabric constraints.

I used the burrito method to attach the yokes.

I used contrast topstitching thread and didn’t do any of the hand sewing the pattern advised, except for the inner waistband. I would have liked to have topstitched this as well, but due to the belt loops being attached before the waistband is joined to the bodice this wasn’t possible. If I wanted to do this I should have bar tacked the belt loops on after attaching the waistband.

Any other changes are highlighted in my first review of this pattern.

I attempted to distress the denim by using fine sandpaper and a sanding block.

I set the sleeves in flat to get the faux flat fell stitch finish on the top of the sleeves: the inside of this dress is all overlocked.

Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?

Yes. I might sew this again. It’s a great pattern. Yes, I highly recommend.

Conclusion:

I think this dress is flattering and comfortable, but the dark denim still makes me feel smart. Love the waistband detail and the slimmer skirt on this version.

See you all soon with hopefully some more Wardobe Contest sewing!

Until soon…

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McCalls 6696 DIY Dark Denim Shirtdress

Edited to add: check out this Boden denim dress….very similar in style, don’t you think?

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Boden Denim Dress

 

McCalls 7058: DIY Basket Weave Wool Winter Coat

McCalls 7058 Basket Weave Interlined Wool Winter Coat
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McCalls 7058 Basket Weave Interlined Wool Winter Coat

Hello Dear Readers,

Today I want to share with you a coat I recently completed. It’s got a bit of backstory. Here goes.

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McCalls 7058 Basket Weave Interlined Wool Winter Coat

The fabric is a beautiful basket weave wool in a dark purple colour that I picked up in Paris a couple of years ago. I didn’t realise it at the time, but it was needle ready: meaning, it was completely interfaced on the wrong side. I really wanted to use this fabric to make myself a winter coat rather than giving into temptation and buying anything else because I am really trying to use fabric from my stash and also I knew that being completely interfaced would significantly cut down on time spent preparing the fabric for sewing.

The pattern I originally wanted to make was this one, from Burda Style (number 6845):

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Burda Style 6845 Line Drawings

This Burda Style pattern pretty much represents my ideal coat: classic styling, notched lapel, two piece sleeves, and – the most important feature I was looking for- single breasted. Yep, as a fuller busted sewist I was determined to sew a single breasted winter coat. I have sewn quite a few double breasted styles over the time I have been blogging like this one, this one and even this one, and, don’t get me wrong, I like all of them and wear them, but don’t the fashion gurus all advice fuller busted women to wear single styles?

As I wanted to make this coat in the shortest time possible (!) I decided not to make a muslin, and just rely on a tissue fit. But once I got going on the Burda pattern I realised that their sizing is not as generous as BMV patterns! It would have taken more effort to make that pattern work (hello, I am a very lazy sewist!) and a muslin would probably have been very advisable. I wanted a new, warm winter coat! So, I checked my patterns and found this one: McCalls 7058. Some doubts about the style but off I set. You can read my full review below.

So overall, this is a nicely drafted pattern. It includes separate front lining, back lining and facing pieces. It has a vent at the back (although the instructions for finishing that confused me no end) and, whilst it does not have two piece sleeves, it does have an elbow dart for some nice shaping. The pattern also includes separate under and upper collar pieces, with the under collar being cut on the bias with a centre back seam included.

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McCalls 7058 Basket Weave Interlined Wool Winter Coat – Back Vents

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McCalls 7058 Basket Weave Interlined Wool Winter Coat – Elbow Dart Shaping to Sleeve

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McCalls 7058 Basket Weave Interlined Wool Winter Coat – Under Collar detail with catch stitched seam allowances

I cut one size bigger than normal on the shoulders, arms and bust, and graded out one size at the hips. I am really happy with the fit overall, especially the upper half.

To make this coat really nice and warm I decided to interline it with pyjama flannel. This was essentially like a heavier weight brushed cotton. I treated this interlining as underlining; machining the interlining to the outer fabric using 0.5 inch seam allowances and trimming out as much of the flannel as possible upto the stitching line, before sewing the outer pieces together. I did not interline the sleeves, just the main body of the coat, and I removed the interlining from the hems. I can confirm this has made this coat lovely and warm and not too heavy either.

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McCalls 7058 Basket Weave Interlined Wool Winter Coat – Inside interlining/ shoulder reinforcement

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McCalls 7058 Basket Weave Interlined Wool Winter Coat – Interlining detail

I used my favoured bias sleeve head technique to set the sleeves in, but last time I made my tailored blazer I found the bias cut hair canvas strips I used weren’t loosely woven enough, so this time I used some self fabric (with the interfacing removed). Worked a treat. Working with wool is lovely though, especially when it comes to things like setting in sleeves etc.

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McCalls 7058 Basket Weave Interlined Wool Winter Coat – Sleeve Head using Self Fabric

After asking for advice on Instagram about closure options, Carolyn (is there anything this woman doesn’t know about sewing?!) suggested lining covered snaps (rather than having metal snaps showing). What? I had never heard of such a thing! A quick google and yep, I saw these could work. So that’s what I did. They were not too difficult to do if you have already made self covered buttons. I also added self made red satin covered piping to the facing – love that flash of colour. BTW after seeing these photos I realise I am going to have to move the top snap position slightly.

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McCalls 7058 Basket Weave Interlined Wool Winter Coat – Inside lining and piping

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McCalls 7058 Basket Weave Interlined Wool Winter Coat – Lining, Piping and Covered Snaps Detail

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McCalls 7058 Basket Weave Interlined Wool Winter Coat – Covered snap detail and piping

Pattern Review

Pattern Description:
Fitted, lined jackets and coats have princess seams and mock button band closing. B: self belt. C: snap closing. B, C and D: collar. B, C, D, E and F: side pockets. C, D and F: back pleat. E and F: hood and detachable (snap) band.

I made view C.
Pattern Sizing:
6 – 22
Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?
Yes.
Were the instructions easy to follow?
Yes, except for the instructions to finish the back vents (steps 57 and 60). I still don’t know if I have done it right. My vents are stitched down and the lining hangs free inside and is sewn (by hand) to the lower coat hem. I am not sure if this is correct or not).
What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?
Overall, this is a nicely drafted pattern. It includes separate front lining, back lining and facing pieces. It has a vent at the back (although the instructions for finishing that confused me no end) and, whilst it does not have two piece sleeves, it does have an elbow dart for some nice shaping. The pattern also includes separate under and upper collar pieces, with the under collar being cut on the bias with a centre back seam included. I also liked the fact it is single breasted (I was on a mission to sew a single breasted winter coat!) Nothing to dislike as such about this pattern.
Fabric Used:
A dark purple basket weave needle ready (completely pre-interfaced) wool purchased in Paris a couple of years ago.
Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:
I cut one size larger than I normally would on the shoulders, arms and bust and graded out one size on the hips.

5/8ths inch sway back adjustment.

Lowered bust fullness by 0.5 inch and did a 1 inch full bust adjustment.

1 inch full arm adjustment.

Shortened sleeves by 1 inch (at the higher lengthen/ shorten lines to ensure elbow dart remained in correct position).

Interlined main body of cotton using pyjama cotton flannel. I treated this interlining as underlining; machining the interlining to the outer fabric using 0.5 inch seam allowances and trimming out as much of the flannel as possible upto the stitching line, before sewing the outer pieces together. I removed the interlining from the hems. I can confirm this has made this coat lovely and warm and not too heavy either.

Made my own shoulder pads, added a shoulder stay and shoulder reinforcement cut from hair canvas.

Used self fabric bias strips (with interfacing removed) as sleeve heads.

Added thread chains to inside to ensure pockets would sit forwards correctly.

Added lining fabric covered snaps.

Added self made satin piping to facing seams.
Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?
I don’t know if I would sew this again (although never say never), and yes I recommend.
Conclusion:

I love the cosiness of my new coat and it feels very comfortable. I need to move the position of the top snap over after seeing these photos!

So, there you have it: I do like my new winter coat but it is not the coat of my sewing dreams. Have you found any great plus size single breasted coats you can recommend to me? BTW, I have seen another pattern on the BurdaStyle website but it’s a down load one…maybe next year…

Until soon!

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McCalls 7058 Basket Weave Interlined Wool Winter Coat

 

 

Sewoverit Pussy Bow Blouse – Version 2 – DIY Silk Tie Neck Blouse

Sewoverit Pussy Bow Blouse in Forest Green Crepe de Chine Silk

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Sewoverit Pussy Bow Blouse in Forest Green Crepe de Chine Silk (worn with my ginger jeans).

Hey Friends,

This here is my second version of the Sewoverit Pussy Bow Blouse, and this time I think I nailed the fit.

You can see my first version here. I have worn this first version quite a bit but it needed a FBA, which I have now done following this tutorial for doing an FBA on a dartless front blouse. It does  mean that now this version has bust darts but I can live with that. The FBA also means the front length is now much improved.

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Sewoverit Pussy Bow Blouse in Forest Green Crepe de Chine Silk


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Sewoverit Pussy Bow Blouse in Forest Green Crepe de Chine Silk

Details (check my first version for full review):

Fabric: Forest green crepe de chine silk ordered from silk seller on eBay.

Edit: some of you have asked for the seller details so here they are: 

http://www.ebay.co.uk/ulk/itm/131724105418

I can’t recommend this seller enough for their quality, value and service. 

Modifications: 0.5 inch FBA and added bust darts. The FBA resulted in a one inch increase in length to the centre front; I added a further 0.5 inches.

Construction: french seamed throughout, including sleeves. I added a continous lapped bound placket to allow me to french seam the sleeve side seams.

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Sewoverit Pussy Bow Blouse in Forest Green Crepe de Chine Silk – continous lapped bound placket

Sam gave me the idea to attach the neck ties to the blouse first and then sew the centre front seam up using a french seam which resulted in a tidier finish.

Overall I love this blouse, and plan on wearing it out for a lunch date on valentines day.

Have a great day!

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Sewoverit Pussy Bow Blouse in Forest Green Crepe de Chine Silk

 

2016 Wardrobe Contest: Sewing Plans

BEGI9119

BEGI9119

Hi Friends,

PR.com are currently running a Wardrobe Contest until the end of March, by which time entrants have to have sewn 5 compulsory garments (2 bottoms, 2 tops and 1 topper), and 5 free choice garments. The tops have to go with all the bottoms and vice versa, and the topper must go with all the outfits. If sewing a dress it must go with the topper and coordinate with the wardrobe.

I am going to try and meet the deadline (?!) because what I have realised is that I have all the fabrics I need to make this wardrobe in my stash (bar one), and all the patterns. So, if nothing else, I will have succeeded in sewing some classic, wearable garments from my stash, which will hopefully coordinate with each other, and in essence, give me a capsule wardrobe of sorts.

Above is an inspiration collage I uploaded to Instagram which captures the kind of look I am after. I am thinking that kind of very wearable, effortless chic that French women seem to pull off so easily, ha! (The collage is missing the tenth item: a white silk blouse).

So today I thought I would share my fabric/ pattern choices. These may change as I progress. Some are patterns I have sewn before; others are new patterns. Already, by sorting through my fabrics/ patterns and writing this post I can see a clear plan and it looks promising.

Item 1: Striped Breton Tunic Top

Pattern: McCalls 6886 (modified to tunic length).

Pattern already sewn up here and here.

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Black white striped ponte knit

M6886

McCalls 6886

 

Item 2: Denim Dress

Pattern: Vogue 9077, View A, possibly with sleeves from View C.

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Denim fabric

V9077

Vogue 9077

 

Item 3: Black Wool Crepe Blazer

Pattern: Vogue 8958, View C (already made View A, here).

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Black wool crepe fabric

V8958

Vogue 8958

 

Item 4: White/ Black Heart Print Blouse

Pattern: Vogue 1387, View B

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White/ black heart print polyester georgette fabric

V1387

Vogue 1387

 

Item 5: Black Triple Crepe Culottes

Pattern: Butterick 6179.

Previously made here.

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Triple crepe fabric

B6179

Butterick 6179

 

Item 6: Red/ Black Animal Print Blouse

Pattern: McCalls 7248, View B.

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Red/ black animal print georgette fabric

M7248

McCalls 7248

 

Item 7: Off white Silk Crepe de Chine Collarless Shirt

Pattern: Simplicity 1279, View C.

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Off white silk crepe de chine fabric

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Simplicity 1279

 

Item 8: White Cotton Shirt

Pattern: Grainline Archer.

Made 3 times to date and last made here.

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White cotton fabric

11004Illustration

Grainline Archer

 

Items 9 and 10: Black and Red Pull on Jeggings

Pattern: Jalie 3461 Eleonore Pull on Jeans.

Previously made here.

 

So that’s the plan: it remains to be seen whether or not I make the deadline!

I had a great weekend meeting up with The Yorkshire Spoolettes. Read about it over on Ali’s blog. It was wonderful to meet other friendly, down to earth sewists and the fabric shopping was good too:-)

How about you? Any sewing plans? Anyone else entering the contest?

Have a great week ahead.

Until soon…

 

 

 

 

 

OOP Butterick 4610: DIY Wool Tailored Blazer

Butterick 4610 DIY Wool Tailored Blazer
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Butterick 4610 DIY Wool Tailored Blazer

Hi Friends,

Following on from my last post where I discussed the construction of this blazer, here’s the finished article modelled on myself and a review of the pattern (OOP Butterick 4610), which was included in the price of the Craftsy class that I followed to make this blazer. We had our first good day of sunshine in at least 2 weeks today, and so I jumped at the chance to take some photographs.

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Butterick 4610 DIY Wool Tailored Blazer

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Butterick 4610 DIY Wool Tailored Blazer

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Butterick 4610 DIY Wool Tailored Blazer

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Butterick 4610 DIY Wool Tailored Blazer

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Butterick 4610 DIY Wool Tailored Blazer

Pattern Review

Pattern Description:
Lined, fitted jacket has princess seams, two piece sleeves, patch pockets and single button closing. B, E: topstitch trim. C: purchased trim. E: contrast flowers.
Pattern Sizing:
6 – 20

I picked a size based on my high bust measurement and then made adjustments from there (see below). I did grade out by one size at the waist and below.
Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?

Yes.
Were the instructions easy to follow?
I didn’t really look at the instructions as I was following a Craftsy class to tailor this jacket. I think they were “ok”.
What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?
I like the finished jacket and I am happy with the fit. This is my first woven, lined, notched lapel, blazer style jacket and I think it was a good starting point. Now I have made it I am thinking it might have been better to have more than one button (although honestly, I doubt I will rarely, if ever, wear it fastened). The thing I disliked the most about this jacket was the setting in of the sleeves. Setting in sleeves is something that doesn’t normally phase me, but I sweated over these. Other reviews don’t mention any issues so this could purely have been down to me, and the adjustments I made (see below).There was just too much ease (particularly at the front of the sleeve). In the end everything looks ok, but if I tried to make this jacket in, say a cotton, I imagine it would be a nightmare!
Fabric Used:
100% wool with a viscose lining. I steam pressed my fabrics before commencing with cutting out.
Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:

  • I lengthened the jacket by 2.5 inches.
  • I did a 6/8ths of an inch sway back adjustment, tapering away to nothing at the side seams.
  • I added in approximately 1 inch to the back and side back seam over the high hip.
  • I did a 5/8ths of an inch forward shoulder adjustment and also a forward shoulder adjustment to the upper sleeve using this tutorial from Heather B.
  • I cut the sleeves at View A and added 2 and 5/8ths inches to the length.
  • 1 inch full arm adjustment.
  • 1 inch FBA, added to the princess seam side panels and the corresponding increase in length to the front of the jacket.
  • This jacket was fully  hand tailored using hair canvas and pad stitching in the lapels and undercollar. Following the Craftsy class I added sleeve vents and taped the roll line using twill tape. I used fusible interfacing on the hems. Full details on what tailoring I did and review of the Craftsy class I followed here.
  • I topstitched the lapels and collar of my jacket by running 2 spools of my regular Gutterman sewing thread through a top stitching needle as I didn’t want a heavy topstitching thread finish.

Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?
I don’t know if I can face the sleeves again, so the answer may be no, which is a shame as I was hoping this may become a TNT pattern. With almost 20 successful reviews of this pattern on PR.com I say don’t let my opinions put you off…
Conclusion:

I am proud of myself for completing this jacket and it is a great way to start the new year, learning new skills that have already made my sewing more on point in other projects. I feel good wearing this jacket and I think it’s a real classic piece that I will never want to part with.

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Butterick 4610 DIY Wool Tailored Blazer

Have a great rest of the week everyone and I will be back soon with more completed projects!

 

 

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