Closet Case Patterns Ginger Skinny Jeans: DIY Dark Denim Skinny Fit Jeans

Closet Case Ginger Skinny Jeans
Closet Case Ginger Skinny Jeans

Closet Case Ginger Skinny Jeans

Hello Friends,

I am absolutely thrilled to say that I have finished sewing my first ever pair of jeans: Closet Case Patterns Ginger Skinny Jeans. And I love them! If I had any doubts at the start about the validity of sewing my own jeans those doubts have been well and truly dispelled. IMO, these jeans are comfortable, flattering and the perfect fit  – for me.

Closet Case Ginger Skinny Jeans

Closet Case Ginger Skinny Jeans

You can read my first post about these jeans here.

Closet Case Ginger Skinny Jeans

Closet Case Ginger Skinny Jeans

What do I want to say about these jeans?

Well, I don’t know what weight or percentage lycra my denim has in it. I would say, at a guess, it is a medium weight denim with not very much lycra in it (less than or equal to 2%)?

In the end I did spend quite a bit of time trying to perfect the fit on these jeans (in addition to making a muslin – see the first post). As the pattern suggests, I basted the jeans together and tried them on. They were too loose below the knees so I pinned out the excess from both the inner and outer seams, unpicked and cut the legs narrower. I then re-basted, tried on again, and decided they were a tad too small (!) around the ankle. Sigh. So I sewed them in that area with a 0.5 inch seam allowance and they are a perfect fit.

Closet Case Ginger Skinny Jeans

Closet Case Ginger Skinny Jeans

Closet Case Ginger Skinny Jeans

Closet Case Ginger Skinny Jeans

You can read the full details on all pattern modifications below.

Closet Case Ginger Skinny Jeans

Closet Case Ginger Skinny Jeans

The eagle eyed among you would have noticed I decided to do my bar tacks and button hole in contrasting red thread. I only used one machine to sew these jeans up (and my overlocker to finish seams – I decided against the flat felled seams in the end). So I was dealing with swapping between 3 different thread colours. But it personally didn’t bother me doing so. I also didn’t have any problems installing my rivets or button – but then I don’t think my rivets or button are the real deal heavy duty metal type. They are what I could source locally to me. Some detail shots:

Closet Case Ginger Skinny Jeans Back Pocket Detail

Closet Case Ginger Skinny Jeans Back Pocket Detail

Closet Case Ginger Skinny Jeans

Closet Case Ginger Skinny Jeans Pocket Stay and Bound Fly Extension

Closet Case Ginger Skinny Jeans Fly Topstitching

Closet Case Ginger Skinny Jeans Fly Topstitching

Closet Case Ginger Skinny Jeans Coin Pocket and Rivet Detail

Closet Case Ginger Skinny Jeans Coin Pocket and Rivet Detail

Pattern Review

Pattern Description:
Classic 5-pocket jeans are given a fresh look with the Ginger Jeans sewing pattern. With a modern and flattering cut, this is the daily staple you’ll reach for again and again. View A features a comfortable low rise with narrow stovepipe legs. View B is sexy and high-waisted with skinny legs.  Designed for stretch denim, Ginger Jeans will hug you in all the right places.

Engineered to be as flattering as possible, Ginger Jeans feature subtly shaped back pockets to highlight the curve of the bum, slimming side seams and a higher back rise to prevent peekabooty.

I made view B, the high-waisted view with skinny legs.
Pattern Sizing:
2 – 18.
Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?
Yes.
Were the instructions easy to follow?
The instructions are good but the sewalong is the bomb! These are the first pair of jeans I have ever made and they make the process painless.
What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?
For me these jeans are the perfect modern skinny jean. There is nothing to dislike.
Fabric Used:
A dark wash denim of unknown weight or lycra percentage. Sorry :-) At a guess I would say these are a medium weight denim with less than or equal to 2% lycra?
Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:
To start with, I cut a size 16 at the waist and a 18 at the hips and thighs, tapering back down to a size 16 below the knees. I ended up keeping the ankle at a size 16, but removed a further 1 inch in total from each leg from the calf up to the knee. I removed the 1 inch from both inside and outside seams.

I ended up pinching out 2 inches in total from the waistband and making it more curved to account for my proportionally smaller waist and sway back. The waist is a perfect fit. No gaping. Amazing!

I initially shortened the length by 2 inches but ended up adding in 1 inch below the knee, because I like my skinny legs to be slightly gathered around the lower calf.

I added the pocket stays – they make such a difference to the tummy area! I cut my stays from a soft cotton shirting.I understitched the pocket linings.

I moved the back pockets over towards the centre back seam by 1 inch.

I ended up scooping the front and back crotch out by 0.25 inch.
Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?
Yes. I most definitely would. It’s just a question of finding the right denim. Yes, I very much recommend.
Conclusion:

I have avoided wearing proper jeans for around 3 years because of problems with fit. These jeans address all the previous problems I faced: no gaping waistband, no bulging tummy, no digging/ cutting in or riding up and just the right amount of fit on the calves. If you have the confidence to try this pattern you won’t regret it. It’s the perfect first-timers pattern.

I am entering these jeans into The Jeans Contest on Sewing Pattern Review, so head over if you want to see all the amazing entries.

Have a great week everyone, and happy mothers day (as it is here in the UK). See you soon!

Closet Case Ginger Skinny Jeans

Closet Case Ginger Skinny Jeans

Closet Case Patterns Ginger Skinny Jeans: Fit and Construction Post

Closet Case Ginger Jeans
Closet Case Ginger Jeans

Closet Case Ginger Jeans

Hello Friends,

I have started sewing a pair of Ginger Skinny Jeans by Closet Case Patterns, and thought I would share my thoughts on fit and construction prior to showing you the finished jeans (hopefully later this week).

Sewing jeans is, for most home sewers, a daunting task. I have never sewn a pair of jeans before (or even proper fitted trousers). Let me tell you I am so impressed with the detailed sewalong for this pattern, which really makes the process easy.

Closet Case Ginger Jeans

Closet Case Ginger Jeans

I did make a muslin. No, I didn’t make a muslin out of denim. I made it from a thickish stretch cotton sateen, more than anything to check the fit of the crotch. I am sure I read somewhere Heather saying something like the crotch on these jeans are designed to fit most people, and I read it and thought “yeah, yeah”, but for me, at least, they seem to fit very well. (Sorry I don’t have any muslin pictures). So the actual changes I made to the pattern are minimal:

  • I cut a size 16 at the waist, grading to a size 18 at the hips and thighs and grading back down to a size 16 below the knees. As others have said, even if you fall a couple of inches outside of the pattern sizing range give this pattern a try because the way it is drafted, together with the ease from your stretch denim, chances are you can make it fit.
  • I ended up pinching out 2 inches in total from the waist band, which probably brings it to a size 14, but, more importantly for me, curved the waistband round to account for my (proportionally smaller) waist and sway back.
  • I shortened the pattern by 2 inches but added an inch back to the final length below the knees. I like my skinny jeans to be slightly longer and gathered round the calf.
  • I have moved the back pockets over by an inch towards the centre back seam. The pockets haven’t yet been topstitched in place, just basted, so their position may change yet.
  • I added the pocket stay, cut from some soft cotton shirting.
Closet Case Ginger Jeans

Closet Case Ginger Jeans

In terms of construction the biggest tip I can give you is to either get one of those humpjumper attachment thingys to fit your sewing machine or just do what I did, fold a spare piece of denim up and place directly behind your machine foot when you come to sewing over thicker layer like the yokes or the edges of the coin pocket. It raises your machine foot to the same level as the fabric you are sewing so you don’t get those horrible skipped, uneven stitches. This is such a great tip to use on so many sewing projects, not just jeans….anywhere you have thick seams to get over.

Sewing over thick layers of denim using an improvised humpjumper

Sewing over thick layers of denim using an improvised humpjumper

I am going to baste my jeans together and have a final try on before the final sewing up. I think I will do the flat fell seam finish on the inside and outside leg seam. I never thought I would say that sewing jeans is very satisfying and hopefully the end result will be worth it.

Until soon, have a great week ahead.

McCalls 6829: DIY Girls Lace Peplum Top #GBSB

McCalls 6829: lace peplum top
McCalls 6829: lace peplum top

McCalls 6829: lace peplum top

Hello Readers,

Who’s been watching Series 3 of the Great British Sewing Bee then? Wasn’t last nights episode great? Without giving too much away, the theme for the week was “sewing with challenging fabrics”, one of them being lace. The lace featured in todays post wasn’t sewn up by any of the contestants (I don’t think), but I think I did spot it for a few seconds being handled by Debra? Anyway, this lace is a very reasonably priced corded lace fabric in lilac, from White Tree Fabrics. White Tree Fabrics asked if I would make something up in this fabric to compliment their laces being featured on the program and I was happy to do so.

McCalls 6829: lace peplum top

McCalls 6829: lace peplum top

The pattern I have used is McCalls 6829 which is sadly now discontinued (although some sites still appear to be selling it). This is one of the Fashion Star patterns, and although, personally I don’t think the envelope photographs do it much favour, it is lovely when made up.

I made view B, but basically decided Kezia has too many party dresses, and a top might be more practical. So I cut the skirt off at 8 inches to make a peplum top. I cut a size 7, but ended up removing a total of about 3 inches from the side seams.

McCalls 6829: lace peplum top

McCalls 6829: lace peplum top

This top is fully underlined (except the yokes) and lined using this aubergine light weight satin (currently reduced to 50% of the original price!) The yokes were cut from this lilac shimmer mesh. I added a sparkly button from my button jar.

McCalls 6829: lace peplum top

McCalls 6829: lace peplum top

McCalls 6829: lace peplum top

McCalls 6829: lace peplum top

The fabrics were easy to cut and work with, although I did use a microtex needle to sew through the satin.

Pattern Review

Pattern Description:

CHILDREN’S/GIRLS’ DRESSES: Lined dresses (cut on the grosgrain) have raised waist, pleated skirt and tie ends, ruffles attached to lining, back-button, loop (elastic) and zipper. A: overlay, sleeves and narrow hem. B: underlined, yokes, purchased flowers, trim and ribbon for tie ends. Designed for lightweight woven fabrics. SUGGESTED FABRICS: Satin, Linen, Peau de Soie; A – Contrast (Overbodice): Single Edged Scalloped Lace. B – Lace. B – Contrast (Yoke): Organza. Ruffle – Netting

I made a slightly modified version of View B.

Pattern Sizing:

3 – 14.

Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?

Yes, except I made a peplum top rather than a dress.

Were the instructions easy to follow?

Yes.

What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?

Nothing to dislike. I love the finished product.

Fabric Used:

A corded polyester lace, a shimmer mesh for the yokes and a lightweight satin to underline and line.

All fabrics were supplied by White Tree Fabrics as a promotion to tie in with this lace being featured on series 3 of the Great British Sewing Bee.

Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:

I cut a size 7 for my 6 year old daughter and removed 3 inches in total from the side seams. I cut the skirt pattern off at 8 inches to create a peplum. Next time I might lengthen this slightly. She’s tall :-)

Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?

Yes! I think this is such a cute top and I could definitely see me making this again in fun cottons for the summer. Yes, if you can get this pattern (it’s now discontinued), I would recommend. It is perhaps a little bit of an older look, but made in cottons I think it will be very cute.

Conclusion:

My daughter’s very pleased with this. It’s perfect to dress up jeans or leggings but still practical to let her play rough and tumble at parties.

Until soon….

McCalls 6829: lace peplum top

McCalls 6829: lace peplum top

McCalls 6991: DIY Draped Wrap Cross Over Printed Top

DSC_7901
DSC_7901

McCalls 6991 Draped Wrap Cross Over Printed Top

Hello Dear Friends,

Another cold, windy, blustery day and another thin top to photograph :-) Hey, I am gearing up for spring!

This is McCalls 6991. If you like this pattern or have it already in your stash, get it out and sew it up soon! These mock wrap cross over front tops are in the shops right now, but I don’t honestly know how long this silhouette will be around. For this particular view (View B) there are 4 pattern pieces to cut. The whole of the front is cut from a single bias piece, with the left cross over front being formed from effectively twisting the fabric round on itself. So you do need a fabric which doesn’t really have a noticeable wrong side.

McCalls 6991

McCalls 6991 Draped Cross Over Printed Top

This is not my first time sewing this pattern. Some of  you may remember the saga of my beautiful washed silk. Yep, not done anything with that top (not worn it either). Any way, that was a different view. I can tell you this top feels extremely comfortable and secure: I have got a RTW top similar to this (see here) but I am always checking that top to make sure I am not exposing myself! No fear of that with this top, the cross over part on the underside feels very secure and the top is fastened with a lightweight concealed button.

McCalls 6991 Draped Cross Over Printed Top

McCalls 6991 Draped Cross Over Printed Top

I was concerned it would be too short at the front. I would possibly prefer for it to be ever so slightly longer at the front but it’s fine. If I was making this top again I would also add the sleeve tabs as I prefer this top with the sleeves rolled up. My fabric is a lightweight polyester. I used a microtex needle to sew it.

McCalls 6991 Draped Cross Over Printed Top

McCalls 6991 Draped Cross Over Printed Top

Pattern Review

Pattern Description:
Bias tops. A and B: very loose-fitting, pullover, mock wrap, self-lined yoke back, left front gathered to right side forming drape, narrow hem and conceal button closing. B: pocket, shaped hemline, wrong side shows on back hemline. C: button tab on rolled sleeves. D: collar. C and D: wrap, semi-fitted, front gathered into yoke, button/loop closing. B, C and D: long sleeves. Note: no provisions provided for above and below waist adjustments.

I made view B.
Pattern Sizing:
8 – 24
Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?
Yes.

Were the instructions easy to follow?
Yes – although I thought the way to finish the neckline/ yoke was tricky to get right
What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?
I love the finished garment – it is very much on trend right now. The key to getting this top right is fabric selection. You need something with drape and two good sides. This pattern runs large – check the finished garment measurements printed on the pattern. I sized down by one size and it fits perfectly for me. Also, beware: if you are making the sleeveless version the armholes seem very low. The one thing I didn’t love was the way the instructions told you to finish the inside yoke seams (lots of handsewing). I did all of it on the machine, but had to topstitch the upper seams. Next time I am going to see if I can machine it all without topstitching.
Fabric Used:
Polyester charmeuse.
Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:
1 inch sway back and shortened sleeves by 3 inches (probably I would prefer them slightly longer). If making again I would add sleeve tabs.
Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?
I might….yes I recommend.
Conclusion:

This is a very on trend very well drafted pattern to have in your collection. Sew it up soon and enjoy wearing it.

Has everyone been watching The Great British Sewing Bee (Series 3)? My fellow White Tree Fabric blogger, Amanda, did a great job last night (and previous episodes). I won’t reveal how she got on, but well done Amanda.

Have a great weekend all!

McCalls 6991 Draped Cross Over Printed Top

McCalls 6991 Draped Cross Over Printed Top

Minoru Jacket Take Two: DIY Khaki Waterproof Hooded Jacket Anorak

Khaki Waterproof Minoru Jacket
Khaki Waterproof Minoru Jacket

Khaki Waterproof Minoru Jacket

Hi Friends,

At the end of 2013 I made my first Sewaholic Minoru Jacket, which you can see and read about here. At the time, I was very pleased with the jacket, and it did get worn quite a bit.

But, I was never fully happy with my fabric selections, and there were parts of the design of the jacket which irked me. Like the fact the collar was too high for me, the hood refused to stay on my head in the wind and the lack of pockets (I added in-seam pockets but they were too shallow to be practical).

Khaki Waterproof Minoru Jacket

Khaki Waterproof Minoru Jacket

It got to the point where I just stopped wearing it, and believe you me, life without a practical raincoat of some kind in this part of this world is, well, not very practical! So, I decided to have another bash at it.

Khaki Waterproof Minoru Jacket

Khaki Waterproof Minoru Jacket

The fabric is described as a water repellent super fine cupro and microfibre soft touch poplin, purchased on ebay (I swatched first). I used a microtex needle to sew it. It was hard to get pins to penetrate through the coated fabric, and I tried to limit pins to seam allowances only. I used my silk organza press cloth throughout. I didn’t use any special thread for the topstitching: I didn’t really want it to stand out too much so used my regular Gutterman polyester.

The jacket is fully lined with an acetate (I think) lining:

Khaki Waterproof Minoru Jacket - inside lining

Khaki Waterproof Minoru Jacket – inside lining

Khaki Waterproof Minoru Jacket - inside lining

Khaki Waterproof Minoru Jacket – inside lining

In terms of the changes I made, I made no changes to the sizing/ fit of the jacket from the previous version. However, I did the following:

  • Shortened the collar height by approx. 1 and 3/4 inches
  • Used a 28 inch (as opposed to suggested 30  inch) zip
  • Omitted the zipped section in the collar to store the hood: I never used this anyway. I sewed the hood directly to the collar/ neck seam of the jacket
  • As a consequence of shortening the collar, I also shortened the length of the plackets by 1 and 3/4 inches
  • Added single welt pockets placed on the diagonal to the front of the jacket. I used this tutorial from Craftsy: it was spot on. I did add anorak snaps to the welts, but they are non functioning (I didn’t add the corresponding back snaps)
  • Added a front zipper guard with snaps. The snaps were a b*tch to put on. I used this tutorial from no big dill, which helped. A little. Tip: buy double the number of snaps you need. You will end up using them all.
  • (Unintentionally) made the hood slightly smaller, and added an elasticated drawstring to keep it on my head
  • Omitted the wide elastic in the back of the jacket and instead added narrow elastic which is adjustable: make as tight or loose as you wish, and I think it’s more flattering (for me)

Lots of pictures:

Khaki Waterproof Minoru Jacket - zipper guard with snaps

Khaki Waterproof Minoru Jacket – zipper guard with snaps

Khaki Waterproof Minoru Jacket - elasticated hood

Khaki Waterproof Minoru Jacket – elasticated hood

Khaki Waterproof Minoru Jacket - back view

Khaki Waterproof Minoru Jacket – back view

Khaki Waterproof Minoru Jacket - back view on dress form

Khaki Waterproof Minoru Jacket – back view on dress form

Khaki Waterproof Minoru Jacket - single welt pocket and adjustable elasticated waist detail

Khaki Waterproof Minoru Jacket – single welt pocket and adjustable elasticated waist detail

Khaki Waterproof Minoru Jacket - elasticated hood detail

Khaki Waterproof Minoru Jacket – elasticated hood detail – BTW, the eyelets were also a b*tch to get in. Tip: interface your fabric in that area and consider adding a square of fabric behind to build your fabric thickness up: too thin a fabric and the eyelets won’t hold

So that’s me sorted for a casual raincoat and I am very pleased with the changes I made and the way this jackets turned out. Added bonus: Khaki is currently very much on trend. I think I am getting addicted to sewing coats of any description!

Have a great weekend everyone!

Khaki Waterproof Minoru Jacket

Khaki Waterproof Minoru Jacket

McCalls 6604: DIY Feather Print Chiffon Top with Pleated Neckline

McCalls 6604: feather print chiffon top with pleated neckline
McCalls 6604: feather print chiffon top with pleated neckline

McCalls 6604: feather print chiffon top with pleated neckline

Hello Friends,

It was totally not the weather today to be parading around outside in a chiffon top, but the things we do for our blog, hey? This is my version of view D from McCalls 6604, and I love the finished product.

McCalls 6604: feather print chiffon top with pleated neckline

McCalls 6604: feather print chiffon top with pleated neckline

The fabric is a polyester chiffon. I didn’t use any special techniques to stabilise it when cutting. I just laid it out on my cutting table, pinned well and weighted it down before cutting out. The only part I cut with my rotary cutter was the neck band, which is cut on the bias. But some useful things tips to aid with sewing chiffon would be:

  • cut notches outwards
  • drop your stitch length (I sewed at 1.6 setting)
  • use a new needle of the right weight/ size (I used a size 70 Schmetz needle)

I actually loved sewing this top and I don’t know why I don’t sew more tops as I badly need them. That will change in the next few weeks!

McCalls 6604: feather print chiffon top with pleated neckline

McCalls 6604: feather print chiffon top with pleated neckline

So, I am quite happy with the fit (I did do some modifications – see below), and it is definitely not tight. But I do think there are some slight drag lines over the bust near the neck line, so if I made this up again then maybe I should do a FBA? Suggestions?

McCalls 6604: feather print chiffon top with pleated neckline

McCalls 6604: feather print chiffon top with pleated neckline

Confession time: I hate wearing camisoles. So, I lined the main body part of this top with a pongee lining I had in my stash. I am so pleased I did this as it just makes wearing this top so easy. I overlocked all the seams using a three thread overlock. This is a polyester top – let’s not get precious about things! The only thing perhaps I should have done differently was underline the pleats and left the rest of the body as a free hanging lining – does that make sense? But it’s a minor quibble.

McCalls 6604: feather print chiffon top with pleated neckline - inside lining view

McCalls 6604: feather print chiffon top with pleated neckline – inside lining view

The sleeves are a little voluminous but not overly so:

McCalls 6604: feather print chiffon top with pleated neckline - sleeves

McCalls 6604: feather print chiffon top with pleated neckline – sleeves

Pattern Review:

Pattern Description:
Fitted, pullover tops have hem variations and narrow hems. A: armhole bands. B: collar, and sleeves rolled-up (wrong side shows) with button tab. A and B: bias front and forward shoulder seams. D: sleeves gathered into cuffs. C and D: bias neck binding and front pleats.

I made view D.
Pattern Sizing:
6 – 22
Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?
Yes. although I lengthened mine.
Were the instructions easy to follow?
Yes.
What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?
I love the finished top. So easy to wear. Nothing to dislike.
Fabric Used:
Polyester chiffon.
Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:
I lengthened the top by about 4.5 inches, and widened slightly at the hips. I did a 1 inch sway back adjustment and a 1.5 inch full arm adjustment. I also ended up narrowing the cuffs by just over 1 inch. I stitched in the ditch to secure the neckline binding, rather than the hand sewing the instructions suggest. I also lined the main body of the top using a pongee lining. I sewed a narrow baby hem for the chiffon.

This top is not tight and is very comfortable to wear but there are some slight drag lines near the bust/ neckline so I don’t know if I need to do a very slight FBA next time round.
Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?
Yes, I might sew this again and I do recommend.
Conclusion

I love the wearability of this top and I enjoyed making it.

McCalls 6604: feather print chiffon top with pleated neckline

McCalls 6604: feather print chiffon top with pleated neckline

I wore this top out today for a valentines lunch date with Philip and we had a lovely time. What ever you do this weekend, hope you enjoy it and spend it with loved ones :-)

IMG_0016

Vogue 9037: DIY Oversized Collar Cream Wrap Winter Coat

Vogue 9037: Oversized collar winter coat
Vogue 9037: Oversized collar winter coat

Vogue 9037: Oversized collar winter coat

Hello there, from a wet and wild Cumbria!

Winter is still with us, and last weekend I decided to make a coat (as you do!) I had this fabric in my stash that I picked up from my local market and I figured if I didn’t use it then it would sit there until next winter…or longer….so I decided to go for it.

Let  me tell you about the fabric first. It was either made by or for Barbour (the company that makes the famous waxed and now quilted jackets). It is perhaps what you might call a technical fabric? I have no idea of the exact composition. It has a nap and is very soft and strokeable. It is also double layered. By that I mean it is two layers of fabric which appear to have been glued together with a layer of foam sandwiched inbetween (so it is quite heavy and very warm). It is also water repellent. Here’s a shot of the fabric so you can see what I mean by the two layers.

Double layered fabric used for Vogue 9037

Double layered fabric used for Vogue 9037

In case any one is wondering about the practicalities of keeping a cream coat like this clean without running up extortionate dry cleaning bills, I prewashed this fabric (I tested a sample first!). In fact, I noticed some marks on it before taking these photographs, so it is in the wash as I type.

Now, the pattern. The pattern is Vogue 9037. Here’s the envelope illustration of the version I sewed (view C).

Vogue 9037 envelope illustration

Vogue 9037 envelope illustration

My version:

Vogue 9037: Oversized collar winter coat

Vogue 9037: Oversized collar winter coat

The major difference you will notice is that I chose to level the bottom hem off (remember if you do this, you also have to adjust the facing pattern piece as well). It’s an easy adjustment to make if you are not fond of the shaped hem thing.

Vogue 9037: Oversized collar winter coat

Vogue 9037: Oversized collar winter coat

Vogue 9037: Oversized collar winter coat

Vogue 9037: Oversized collar winter coat

This is classed as a very easy vogue pattern and it was very easy. I don’t think there was anything particularly difficult about it and the results, as you can see, are pretty dramatic. If you don’t like the oversized collar thing, this pattern isn’t for you (although there are two other more moderately sized collars included in the envelope).

I didn’t want to line this fabric. It is double faced so I didn’t see the point. That  is in part why I went for this pattern. However,  you are then left with a dilemma as to how to finish the insides. I chose to make bias binding from a polyester satin and do a hong kong finish on most of the seams. I started doing it on the pockets and side seams and it looked like a dogs dinner. So I ripped that off and tried overlocking those seams. Again. Not nice. This is a thick fabric. In the end I settled for pinking those edges (another thing about this fabric is it doesn’t fray). I am ok with it. (Ignore what else you can see on the dummy: my daughter has claimed this dummy for her own!)

Vogue 9037 inside finish

Vogue 9037 inside finish

Vogue 9037 inside finish

Vogue 9037 inside finish

The one thing I wish I had done differently was adjust the collar for turn of cloth. Ah well, It’s not too obvious but a lesson learned for next time.

Pattern Review

Pattern Description:
Loose-fitting, unlined, double-breasted jacket has collar variations, front and back tucks, shaped front hemline and snap closing. C: side pockets. A and C: self belt. Note: No provisions provided for above waist adjustment.

I made a slightly modified view C.
Pattern Sizing:
6 – 22
Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?
Yes, I think so, although I chose to level the front hem off (remember if you do this you have to also change the facing piece as well).
Were the instructions easy to follow?

Yes.
What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?
I love the finished effect. That is probably alot to do with my fabric (see below), but if you want a dramatic oversized collar, then this does the job.I wish I had adjusted for turn of cloth on the collar.
Fabric Used:
It was either made by or for Barbour (the company that makes the famous waxed and now quilted jackets). It is perhaps what you might call a technical fabric? I have no idea of the exact composition. It has a nap and is very soft and strokeable. It is also double layered/ double faced. By that I mean it is two layers of fabric which appear to have been glued together with a layer of foam sandwiched inbetween (so it is quite heavy and very warm). There is no wrong side and it does not fray when cut. It is also water repellent.

Because of the above, I wanted a pattern for a coat which was unlined. I chose to finish my jacket with a combination of a hong kong finish and pinking.
Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:
I levelled the front hem and facing piece off, and added 1 inch to the lower hems. I shortened the sleeves by about an inch and did a 1 inch full arm adjustment. I hand sewed the hems. I added belt loops and some topstitching to the belt.
Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?

It’s quite distinctive so probably not (maybe one of the other views?). Yes, I recommend.
Conclusion:

I feel ab fab when I wear this coat. It feels amazing on and I am sure I will get a little more wear out of this  piece before packing it away until next year.

Wherever you are, keep warm and keep sewing. Until soon…

Vogue 9037: Oversized collar winter coat

Vogue 9037: Oversized collar winter coat

Saiph Papercut Tunic: DIY Mustard Quilted Tunic Dress

Mustard Saiph Papercut Tunic in quilted jersey
Mustard Saiph Papercut Tunic in quilted jersey

Mustard Saiph Papercut Tunic in quilted jersey

Hello Dear Friends,

Here’s a little splash of colour to brighten a now dull and cold winters day. Mmmmmm…..mustard. It’s not a colour everyone likes, but, as Sunni wrote in this post, it’s something that I am drawn too (and I loved her mustard skirt!)

The fabric is somekind of quilted jersey/ cloque (from ebay). I have another piece in navy. It is warmer than wearing your average jersey, but handles something like a scuba. It was definitely easier to handle and I would say more hard wearing than my last quilted jersey piece, detailed here.

Quilted jersey/ cloque

Quilted jersey/ cloque

The pattern is the Saiph Tunic from Papercut Patterns. I first made it here.

Mustard Saiph Papercut Tunic in quilted jersey

Mustard Saiph Papercut Tunic in quilted jersey

In addition to whatever changes I made last time, this time round I did a one inch sway back adjustment, I took a little more off the sides at the waist and I redrafted the neck facings and deepened them by one inch. I also slip stitched the facings to the shoulder and back seam to stop it flipping out.

Mustard Saiph Papercut Tunic in quilted jersey

Mustard Saiph Papercut Tunic in quilted jersey

The hems were overlocked, turned once and stitched. Yes, I change all my overlocker threads everytime to suit each project. :-)

Mustard Saiph Papercut Tunic in quilted jersey

Mustard Saiph Papercut Tunic in quilted jersey

Hmmm…not much else to say. I told you I wanted a couple of looser fitting tunic styles in my wardrobe for the cold weather and I have them now. Now on to other, more complex projects!

Here’s a shot without the scarf. I do think if I made this again I might raise the neck up slightly.

Mustard Saiph Papercut Tunic in quilted jersey

Mustard Saiph Papercut Tunic in quilted jersey

Until soon….have a great weekend…we are predicted extremely cold weather next week (minus temperatures), so I am off to hibernate :-)

Mustard Saiph Papercut Tunic in quilted jersey

Mustard Saiph Papercut Tunic in quilted jersey

Erbsenprinzessin ballet suit leotard pattern: DIY girls gymnastics leotard

DIY gymnastics leotard
DIY gymnastics leotard

DIY gymnastics leotard

Hi Friends,

Today is a quick review of a gymnastics leotard that I made for Kezia using a new to me pattern: it’s the Erbsenprinzessin ballet suit leotard pattern, which I downloaded from Etsy. If you have a little girl (or even not so little; the pattern runs to 12 years), who is into gymnastics or ballet I highly recommend this pattern.

Kezia started gymnastics in September and loves it. Before that, she did a couple of years of ballet/ dance. So she was wearing her old skirted ballet dress. I told her I wouldn’t buy her a new leotard until she had gone to gymnastics for at least a couple of terms (tough mum!) so when I came across this pattern and realised I had some black swimsuit fabric left over from my Ginger swimsuit, I thought, let’s see if I can do this.

DIY gymnastics leotard

DIY gymnastics leotard

Why do I love this pattern? It’s such great value for money, it’s so quick to tape together and sew, and the results and fit (for me/ Kezia at least) are brilliant. I couldn’t be happier with it. Also, the pattern includes options to sew a skirted ballet style leotard too. It’s a basic pattern, not a fancy one like your Jalie types, but I reckon it wouldn’t be hard to customise.

DIY gymnastics leotard

DIY gymnastics leotard

(BTW, apologies for the not very good photos: you can tell I took these and not Philip or my sister).

Anyway, I pretty much followed the instructions. I cut a straight size 6 I think? It fits perfectly. I added the crotch (self) lining. The only thing I did differently was that the instructions tell you to use FOE or a self fabric band to finish the neck/ leg holes. I used knit elastic (not woven elastic; that is harder to apply) and stitched it to the wrong side of the suit, folded it over and stitched it down again.

DIY gymnastics leotard

DIY gymnastics leotard

I have a long list of things I want to sew for spring already. Any one else thinking of spring sewing? Have a great day!

DIY gymnastics leotard

DIY gymnastics leotard

McCalls 6885: DIY Denim Tunic Dress

McCalls 6885: denim tunic dress
McCalls 6885: denim tunic dress

McCalls 6885: denim tunic dress

Hi There Folks,

Well, winter continues on here. I can’t complain too much: the winter so far in this corner of the world has been relatively mild. But it’s still quite cold, wet and windy. I wanted a couple of casual, throw on dresses that I could layer over tights and boots. And also, more loose fitting in style.

Enter McCalls 6885. This is described as a semi-fitted pullover dress, which should have a collar and collar/ front button bands. You will notice on my version that I decided to omit the collar to give a more grandad style collar.

McCalls 6885: denim tunic dress

McCalls 6885: denim tunic dress

Here’s the back view. I decided to add the waist ties, which I made from self fabric. Those fabric ties were designed by the devil himself. I spent more than an hour trying to turn them the right way round (using a pair of tweezers!) and my ties are shorter than the pattern indicates. Just saying. You will also notice I added a back yoke with some topstitching.

McCalls 6885: denim tunic dress

McCalls 6885: denim tunic dress

Here’s the inside of the yoke, which I cut from cotton.

McCalls 6885: denim tunic dress

McCalls 6885: denim tunic dress

I decided to add hammer on denim buttons. I wish I had thought more about my thread colours. I did the topstitching in brown, but the seams (and subsequent buttonholes) were sewn in white. Ah well. I also flat fell seamed the arm seam that gets folded over.

McCalls 6885: denim tunic dress

McCalls 6885: denim tunic dress

I actually love wearing this. It’s just so easy to pull on and go. I love the loose, casual fit and the very soft denim. I wish I had been able to get it in a darker wash, but this is all my local market had. Next time!

Pattern Review

Pattern Description:

Semi-fitted, pullover dresses have collar, collar/front bands, front pleat and narrow hem. C: purchased belt. D: pockets, tie ends and long sleeves with button tab. Shaped hemline B, C and rolled sleeves D: wrong side shows. Lined hat has top, crown and brim.

I made view D.

Pattern Sizing:

8 – 24

Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?

Yes. Although I omitted the collar.

Were the instructions easy to follow?

Yes.

What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?

I love the loose casual fit and the pullover style. I can see this dress being made in so many different fabrics. Nothing to dislike. Although be warned, the sides of this view are very short. If I was going to make this to wear in the summer and wanted the shaped sides I would lengthen.

Fabric Used:

A very soft, lightweight denim.

Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:

I added a back yoke.

I did a 1 inch sway back adjustment.

I shortened the sleeve length by an inch?

I omitted the collar.

I flat fell seamed the sleeve seam that gets turned over.
Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?

Yes and yes.

Conclusion:

This is such a great casual dress pattern to have in your collection that can be made for year round wear. I love it!

What do you think? Are you a fan of the looser, tunic style?

Have a great rest of the weekend!

McCalls 6885: denim tunic dress

McCalls 6885: denim tunic dress

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