Sewoverit Pussy Bow Blouse – Version 2 – DIY Silk Tie Neck Blouse

Sewoverit Pussy Bow Blouse in Forest Green Crepe de Chine Silk

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Sewoverit Pussy Bow Blouse in Forest Green Crepe de Chine Silk (worn with my ginger jeans).

Hey Friends,

This here is my second version of the Sewoverit Pussy Bow Blouse, and this time I think I nailed the fit.

You can see my first version here. I have worn this first version quite a bit but it needed a FBA, which I have now done following this tutorial for doing an FBA on a dartless front blouse. It does  mean that now this version has bust darts but I can live with that. The FBA also means the front length is now much improved.

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Sewoverit Pussy Bow Blouse in Forest Green Crepe de Chine Silk


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Sewoverit Pussy Bow Blouse in Forest Green Crepe de Chine Silk

Details (check my first version for full review):

Fabric: Forest green crepe de chine silk ordered from silk seller on eBay.

Edit: some of you have asked for the seller details so here they are: 

http://www.ebay.co.uk/ulk/itm/131724105418

I can’t recommend this seller enough for their quality, value and service. 

Modifications: 0.5 inch FBA and added bust darts. The FBA resulted in a one inch increase in length to the centre front; I added a further 0.5 inches.

Construction: french seamed throughout, including sleeves. I added a continous lapped bound placket to allow me to french seam the sleeve side seams.

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Sewoverit Pussy Bow Blouse in Forest Green Crepe de Chine Silk – continous lapped bound placket

Sam gave me the idea to attach the neck ties to the blouse first and then sew the centre front seam up using a french seam which resulted in a tidier finish.

Overall I love this blouse, and plan on wearing it out for a lunch date on valentines day.

Have a great day!

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Sewoverit Pussy Bow Blouse in Forest Green Crepe de Chine Silk

 

2016 Wardrobe Contest: Sewing Plans

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BEGI9119

Hi Friends,

PR.com are currently running a Wardrobe Contest until the end of March, by which time entrants have to have sewn 5 compulsory garments (2 bottoms, 2 tops and 1 topper), and 5 free choice garments. The tops have to go with all the bottoms and vice versa, and the topper must go with all the outfits. If sewing a dress it must go with the topper and coordinate with the wardrobe.

I am going to try and meet the deadline (?!) because what I have realised is that I have all the fabrics I need to make this wardrobe in my stash (bar one), and all the patterns. So, if nothing else, I will have succeeded in sewing some classic, wearable garments from my stash, which will hopefully coordinate with each other, and in essence, give me a capsule wardrobe of sorts.

Above is an inspiration collage I uploaded to Instagram which captures the kind of look I am after. I am thinking that kind of very wearable, effortless chic that French women seem to pull off so easily, ha! (The collage is missing the tenth item: a white silk blouse).

So today I thought I would share my fabric/ pattern choices. These may change as I progress. Some are patterns I have sewn before; others are new patterns. Already, by sorting through my fabrics/ patterns and writing this post I can see a clear plan and it looks promising.

Item 1: Striped Breton Tunic Top

Pattern: McCalls 6886 (modified to tunic length).

Pattern already sewn up here and here.

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Black white striped ponte knit

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McCalls 6886

 

Item 2: Denim Dress

Pattern: Vogue 9077, View A, possibly with sleeves from View C.

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Denim fabric

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Vogue 9077

 

Item 3: Black Wool Crepe Blazer

Pattern: Vogue 8958, View C (already made View A, here).

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Black wool crepe fabric

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Vogue 8958

 

Item 4: White/ Black Heart Print Blouse

Pattern: Vogue 1387, View B

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White/ black heart print polyester georgette fabric

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Vogue 1387

 

Item 5: Black Triple Crepe Culottes

Pattern: Butterick 6179.

Previously made here.

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Triple crepe fabric

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Butterick 6179

 

Item 6: Red/ Black Animal Print Blouse

Pattern: McCalls 7248, View B.

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Red/ black animal print georgette fabric

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McCalls 7248

 

Item 7: Off white Silk Crepe de Chine Collarless Shirt

Pattern: Simplicity 1279, View C.

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Off white silk crepe de chine fabric

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Simplicity 1279

 

Item 8: White Cotton Shirt

Pattern: Grainline Archer.

Made 3 times to date and last made here.

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White cotton fabric

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Grainline Archer

 

Items 9 and 10: Black and Red Pull on Jeggings

Pattern: Jalie 3461 Eleonore Pull on Jeans.

Previously made here.

 

So that’s the plan: it remains to be seen whether or not I make the deadline!

I had a great weekend meeting up with The Yorkshire Spoolettes. Read about it over on Ali’s blog. It was wonderful to meet other friendly, down to earth sewists and the fabric shopping was good too :-)

How about you? Any sewing plans? Anyone else entering the contest?

Have a great week ahead.

Until soon…

 

 

 

 

 

OOP Butterick 4610: DIY Wool Tailored Blazer

Butterick 4610 DIY Wool Tailored Blazer
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Butterick 4610 DIY Wool Tailored Blazer

Hi Friends,

Following on from my last post where I discussed the construction of this blazer, here’s the finished article modelled on myself and a review of the pattern (OOP Butterick 4610), which was included in the price of the Craftsy class that I followed to make this blazer. We had our first good day of sunshine in at least 2 weeks today, and so I jumped at the chance to take some photographs.

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Butterick 4610 DIY Wool Tailored Blazer

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Butterick 4610 DIY Wool Tailored Blazer

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Butterick 4610 DIY Wool Tailored Blazer

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Butterick 4610 DIY Wool Tailored Blazer

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Butterick 4610 DIY Wool Tailored Blazer

Pattern Review

Pattern Description:
Lined, fitted jacket has princess seams, two piece sleeves, patch pockets and single button closing. B, E: topstitch trim. C: purchased trim. E: contrast flowers.
Pattern Sizing:
6 – 20

I picked a size based on my high bust measurement and then made adjustments from there (see below). I did grade out by one size at the waist and below.
Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?

Yes.
Were the instructions easy to follow?
I didn’t really look at the instructions as I was following a Craftsy class to tailor this jacket. I think they were “ok”.
What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?
I like the finished jacket and I am happy with the fit. This is my first woven, lined, notched lapel, blazer style jacket and I think it was a good starting point. Now I have made it I am thinking it might have been better to have more than one button (although honestly, I doubt I will rarely, if ever, wear it fastened). The thing I disliked the most about this jacket was the setting in of the sleeves. Setting in sleeves is something that doesn’t normally phase me, but I sweated over these. Other reviews don’t mention any issues so this could purely have been down to me, and the adjustments I made (see below).There was just too much ease (particularly at the front of the sleeve). In the end everything looks ok, but if I tried to make this jacket in, say a cotton, I imagine it would be a nightmare!
Fabric Used:
100% wool with a viscose lining. I steam pressed my fabrics before commencing with cutting out.
Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:

  • I lengthened the jacket by 2.5 inches.
  • I did a 6/8ths of an inch sway back adjustment, tapering away to nothing at the side seams.
  • I added in approximately 1 inch to the back and side back seam over the high hip.
  • I did a 5/8ths of an inch forward shoulder adjustment and also a forward shoulder adjustment to the upper sleeve using this tutorial from Heather B.
  • I cut the sleeves at View A and added 2 and 5/8ths inches to the length.
  • 1 inch full arm adjustment.
  • 1 inch FBA, added to the princess seam side panels and the corresponding increase in length to the front of the jacket.
  • This jacket was fully  hand tailored using hair canvas and pad stitching in the lapels and undercollar. Following the Craftsy class I added sleeve vents and taped the roll line using twill tape. I used fusible interfacing on the hems. Full details on what tailoring I did and review of the Craftsy class I followed here.
  • I topstitched the lapels and collar of my jacket by running 2 spools of my regular Gutterman sewing thread through a top stitching needle as I didn’t want a heavy topstitching thread finish.

Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?
I don’t know if I can face the sleeves again, so the answer may be no, which is a shame as I was hoping this may become a TNT pattern. With almost 20 successful reviews of this pattern on PR.com I say don’t let my opinions put you off…
Conclusion:

I am proud of myself for completing this jacket and it is a great way to start the new year, learning new skills that have already made my sewing more on point in other projects. I feel good wearing this jacket and I think it’s a real classic piece that I will never want to part with.

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Butterick 4610 DIY Wool Tailored Blazer

Have a great rest of the week everyone and I will be back soon with more completed projects!

 

 

Butterick 4610: Inside my Tailored Blazer and a Review of Craftsy’s Blazer Tailoring Class

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Hi Friends,

Note: this post contains some affiliate links. Also this post is picture heavy. Grab a drink and come sit down….

It’s SO nice to be back with you. If you have been following me on Instagram you would have already seen all of the following pictures. But today’s post gives those of you who haven’t seen them a chance to do so, as well as reading a little bit more about the construction of my tailored wool blazer and also reading my honest review of Craftsy’s Classic Tailoring: The Blazer Class. My blazer is now fully completed but I am waiting for a good day weather wise to photograph. It may be a while….

I followed Classic Tailoring: The Blazer to sew my blazer. I have never sewn a woven lined, notched lapel blazer before, nor have I ever done any tailoring. This class, IMHO, is not aimed at complete beginner sewists. That’s not to say you have to have any knowledge or experience of tailoring. Not at all. But the class does assume quite a lot of prior knowledge/ expertise. You have to know how to cut out a pattern, cut out fabric on grain, make a muslin, fit the muslin, make changes to your pattern and cut out your fashion fabric and lining. There are also other things which the class doesn’t show you (see below). If you need help on those other aspects there are other Craftsy classes which maybe you should consider taking first? BTW, Butterick 4610 (now OOP) is included with the cost of this class.

The class is spread out over 10 lessons which take up approximately 5 hours viewing time. You start off being shown how to create pattern pieces for the inner supporting structure for the blazer, which are cut from muslin and hair canvas. You then move on to cutting and applying hair canvas for the blazer fronts and being shown how to mark pad stitching lines, do the pad stitching and also how to establish (on the muslin/ tissue) and mark the roll line using twill tape. Note: you are also shown how to do a bound button hole, but I chose not to do this on my blazer.

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Butterick 4610: inside structure of blazer: muslin supporting pieces and hair canvas attached to blazer fronts

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Butterick 4610 hand tailored wool blazer: LHS: hair canvas in blazer fronts; catch stitching around dart opening; catch stitched twill tape roll line; hair canvas shoulder reinforcement and pad stitched lapels. RHS: close up of pad stitching.

After this you move on to the construction of the undercollar. Again, you are shown how to mark and do padstitching. The concept of turn of cloth is explained, but it might have been nice to have had an example where the instructor actually had to do an adjustment because, TBH, I still feel a little confused about the concept :-)

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Butterick 4610 Wool Blazer: Marking the undercollar for padstitching and starting padstitching itself.

The body is next assembled and the instructor talks about using wigan in the hems of the blazer. I could not get hold of any wigan and chose to use a lightweight knit interfacing instead (you can see in the first photo above). Worked fine. You are also shown how to apply a shoulder stay. All good stuff.

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Butterick 4610: Wool Blazer. Main body of jacket constructed; hems interfaced and shoulder stay applied.

After this you move on to attaching the undercollar to the blazer, and are shown how to catch stitch seam allowances to achieve a clean, smooth finish. You are shown how to alter the (two piece) sleeve pattern pieces to include a vent. I think it was good this was included as part of the class so that you can alter future patterns that might not have this feature. The instructor also demonstrates a neat way to line the patch pockets and attach the pockets to the blazer.

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Butterick 4610: Wool Blazer: Padstitched under collar attached to main body of blazer and seam allowances catch stitched down.

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Butterick 4610: Wool Blazer: The 2 piece sleeve pattern pieces are altered to include a vent and the vent is sewn.

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Butterick 4610: Wool Blazer: Lined patch pockets.

The next stage is setting in the sleeves. TBH I was a little dissappointed with this aspect of the class, in that the setting in of sleeves is not actually shown in the class. It is completed off camera and then a completed example shown. Again, this may have been a case of assuming prior knowledge of how to do this, but it might have been nice to have seen, for example, setting in a sleeve using a bias sleeve head method (which is what I chose to do). Also, personally speaking, I am not able to obtain nice shoulder pads local to me and this is why I generally prefer to make my own using the pattern pieces.

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Butterick 4610: Wool Blazer: I used a piece of bias cut hair canvas to take up the ease in my sleeve heads prior to setting in the sleeve. This is not shown as part of the Craftsy Class.

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Butterick 4610: Wool Blazer: Custom made shoulder pads. I put the front and back pieces of the blazer together and traced off the shape of the armhole, extending almost down to the front and back notches and curving the outer edge smoothly about 2 inches from the neckline seam. I cut the pieces from batting, making each piece about 3/8 inch smaller than the last and placed them all on a piece of hair canvas before serpentine stitching through all the layers to hold them together and then steaming over my tailors ham to shape.

The lining is assembled next. Again, I was a little surprised at this aspect of the class. In all the stuff I have read in tailoring books/ online etc most people seem to advise adding about 0.25 inches at the underarms of lining pieces (to allow it to fit smoothly over the underarm seam without distorting) and also to the side seams of lining pieces – again to ensure the lining will not pull the blazer once assembled. The instructor doesn’t make any mention of this. You are told to simply follow the pattern instructions to cut the lining out and then told to basically take less seam allowance at the shoulder seam to account for the shoulder pad. Hmpf. Didn’t like this. I followed my tailoring book for this part.

Other things which the class includes which I chose not to do: I machine stitched my facing seam allowances in place (didn’t hand stitch) I used my machine to add a decorative stitch to the back lining pleat rather than hand feather stitching. I machined in my sleeve lining rather than hand stitching it in place.

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Butterick 4610: Wool Blazer: Lining inserted into jacket

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Butterick 4610: Lining: close up of machine decorative stitch on back pleat

Still awake? Ok. The upper collar is now attached to the lining and the upper collar/ lining unit attached to the outer blazer. You are shown how to trim the seam allowances, press the blazer and baste the lapels whilst pressing to encourage the turn of cloth. These steps are crucial to getting a  professional finish on your blazer. You need good pressing tools to get a good finish (wooden clapper, press cloth, tailors board etc). These are demonstrated in the class.

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Butterick 4610: Wool Blazer: Upper collar and lining unit attached to blazer BEFORE pressing

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Butterick 4610: Wool Blazer: Upper collar and lining unit attached to the blazer AFTER pressing.

The final steps of the class show you how to hand stitch the lining in place (and finish your bound buttonholes if you chose to do them). It also shows you how to tack the roll line and collar to the lining to keep them together and how to complete the topstitching, sew on your buttons correctly and then finally press!

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Butterick 4610: Wool Blazer: Hand finished lining with jump hem

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Butterick 4610: Wool Blazer: Sleeve vents with leather buttons attached.

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Butterick 4610: Wool Blazer: Topstitching lapels detail

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Butterick 4610: Wool Blazer: The completed blazer

A lot of work right? In case anyone is wondering this blazer took approximately 3 weeks to complete (not working on it every day, but in small chunks as and when). As someone who generally avoids handstitching I did not find the work tedious or dull. I learned such a lot and although I don’t know if I will jump into making another hand tailored jacket for a very long time (if ever!) I do not regret the time spent making this piece.

To conclude: yes, there were things which I didn’t like about this class, but overall, I definitely do recommend it. I have the Tailoring the Perfect Jacket book  (which I also highly recommend), but I would not have been able to complete this project with the book alone, even though the book covers all (and sometimes more) than the class.  Having the instructor demonstrating the techniques is invaluable and I was also able to ask the instructor questions which she answered. So yes, I do highly recommend.

Up next will be final photos of the completed blazer (on me) and a review of the pattern itself. Well done for reading this far :-)

Have a great rest of the day and look forward to reading your comments/ questions!

Until soon….

 

 

 

 

2016: New Year: New Skills

Butterick 4610 hand tailored wool blazer

Happy New Year Friends!

I hope the new year brings you all health, happiness, peace and prosperity. And, of course, many great sewing successes.

Last year’s sewing was, overall, very good for me. I think it was a combination of just getting more adept at things like fitting and sewing trickier fabrics, and also being more realistic about sewing things that I really wear in my day to day life. I am not going to do a full review here, instead I would rather look forward to 2016, but here are some of the things which I have worn most often in the last year since being made (if you click on the photos they should take you to the individual reviews/ blog posts):

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Khaki Waterproof Minoru Jacket

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True Bias Sutton Blouse made from upcycled silk

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Vogue 8952: Woven Silk Front Wool Jersey Top

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McCalls 6291, 6991 and Butterick 5926: printed pants, crossover wrap top and ponte blazer

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Butterick 6179: DIY White Linen Twill Culottes

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New Look 6225: Floral Contrast Raglan Silk Tee

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Muse Patterns Jenna Cardigan: DIY Sweater Knit Cardigan

As for 2016: I want to learn and master new skills. And I have made a start on that already. If you follow me on instagram you would have seen that over the last week I have been posting my progress on a wool blazer which I am hand tailoring. Here are a few snapshots so far – full details to follow.

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Butterick 4610 hand tailored wool blazer

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Butterick 4610 hand tailored wool blazer

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Butterick 4610 hand tailored wool blazer

Needless to say this is a project which I am not rushing, but spending what time I can on it a day at a time. It has taken me just over a week to get to the stage you can see in the last picture. Already I feel so much more…empowered? Conquering the fear of sewing a  tailored garment with a notched lapel. Bring on the next challenge! (Well, of course, I still have a long way to go…)

If I have to summarise I hope 2016 will be about crafting beautiful, classic pieces which will have longevity in my wardrobe. Expect to see a few silk blouses because I enjoy wearing them :-) And some fun stuff thrown in too.

Until soon….

 

 

 

McCalls 6886: DIY Floral Print Pull On Jersey Dress

McCalls 6886: DIY Floral Print Pull On Jersey Dress
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McCalls 6886: DIY Floral Print Pull On Jersey Dress

Hey Readers,

Hope you all had a fantastic, peaceful and joyous christmas. I had a lovely time with my family, eating lots, playing games and watching Kezia opening her presents.

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McCalls 6886: DIY Floral Print Pull On Jersey Dress

This here is my second version of McCalls 6886. I have been wearing my first version quite a bit because it is so easy to throw on, is comfortable and warm. After my velvet dresses didn’t quite work out, I decided on christmas eve morning to sew this version up (got to have a new dress for christmas!) The (stash) fabric, from what I can recall, was described as a (probably) poly waffle textured jersey.

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McCalls 6886: DIY Floral Print Pull On Jersey Dress

You can read my review for this pattern here. The only thing I did differently this time was to cut my true size (last time I sized down by 2 inches because the sweater knit had a lot of stretch). I didn’t want to go too tight with this fabric because it tends to show white when stretched.

So that’s it: super fast and easy and so easy to wear. Will I make another one? Maybe. But I think I want a more complex project next: something to sink my teeth into. What about you? What’s on your sewing plans?

Thanks to everyone to who continues to read my blog and leave comments. Here’s wishing you all a wonderful healthy, prosperous and happy New Year!

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McCalls 6886: DIY Floral Print Pull On Jersey Dress

 

 

McCalls 7243 and Vogue 1359: DIY Velvet Dresses: Or When You Make 2 Dresses and Dislike Both

Vogue 1359: DIY Bottle Green Velvet Dress
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Vogue 1359: DIY Bottle Green Velvet Dress

Friends,

The Festive Season is upon us and I wanted a quick fix make: a dressy dress that would also be comfortable to wear. You know how it goes: christmas day is spent eating and lounging around on the floor, playing games, opening presents etc. And before christmas day are the inevitable meals out/ drinks etc. Velvet is very on trend at the moment and as I had some stretch velvet in my stash I just need the inspiration.

The inspiration came via The McCalls Pattern Company on Instagram, who posted this dress from Zara, and suggested using McCalls 7243 to sew a similar version:

This is my version – and I am going to say it right upfront. I DISLIKE IT. So much so that I am only going to post one picture of it. (Forgive the opaque tights: these pictures were taken one very cold afternoon before rushing off to the school nativity play).

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McCalls 7243: Black Velvet Zara Inspired Dress with Collar

I don’t think it is the patterns fault as such. I have seen a couple of decent versions of this pattern sewn up. I think my issue is the proportions of the collar on my significant bust! It just doesn’t look right. I would have probably preferred for the neck to be a bit deeper too. Furthermore, I took the decision to self line the collar because I didn’t want to have to deal with a potentially messy hem with the velvet, and I don’t think the self lining was such a great idea. The collar just won’t sit quite right.

Anyway, this dress is sadly a wadder for me. I did actually end up wearing it out to the nativity with a cardigan over the top, and then we went out for dinner afterwards. But nope, it will probably be donated. Apart from a little bit of time I haven’t lost much. Review below.

But then! I decided I HAD to have a velvet dress so I purchased 2 metres of another stretch velvet in a deep bottle green (much nicer colour wise IRL than in these photos). This second velvet was heavier than the black. hmmmm….

I used Vogue 1359 (now OOP) which I have made previously with great success (see here for details). I assumed there would be no fit issues and ploughed on, eager to get finished. The only changes made were that this velvet version is unlined (the neckline is finished with a facing) and the hem was eventually finished with a bias facing because it ended up being too short….see below.

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Vogue 1359: DIY Bottle Green Velvet Dress

So, the issue with this green dress is that the waistline is far to high: about 1 – 2 inches too high. I am guessing (?) it is to do with the bulkiness of the front knot causing the waistline to ride up? I ended up having to stitch the knot into place because the opening was pulling open. Ergh! I am NOT happy with the fit even though it doesn’t look that bad in the photographs, I am disappointed.

Pattern Review McCalls 7243

Pattern Description:
Close-fitting, pullover top and dresses have collar, and stitched hems. Narrow hem finish on collar, and armholes A.
Pattern Sizing:
4 – 20

I sized down on the bust and graded out over the waist/ hips.
Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?
Kind of…
Were the instructions easy to follow?
For the most part yes. The way the collar is finished is something like a flat fell finish? Little tricky but doable.
What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?

I do not like this dress on me at all. It’s not the fault of the pattern: I have seen decent versions on other sewists. I think my major issue is the proportion of the collar on my significant bust! It just doesn’t look right. I would have probably preferred for the neck to be a bit deeper too. Furthermore, I took the decision to self line the collar because I didn’t want to have to deal with a potentially messy hem with the velvet, and I don’t think the self lining was such a great idea. The collar just won’t sit quite right.
Fabric Used:
Stretch velvet
Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:
I did cut the outer curve of the collar at the largest size because I  did have a feeling the collar would be proportionally small, but to no avail.

I did a 1″ sway back adjustment.

I added 3 inches to the length (yep, this dress is short. I am 5’3″ FYI).

I decided to self line the collar to avoid hemming the velvet….mistake. I think the velvet against velvet is part of the problem of the collar not sitting right.

I used a walking foot to sew.

I stabilised the shoulders with clear elastic.

I staystitched the neckline (not mentioned in instructions).

I used fusible hemming tape to hem…
Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?
Nope. Yep I would recommend if you like the look (i.e. are smaller in the bust).
Conclusion:

You win some, you lose some. Sadly this dress is not for me and will probably be donated.

In conclusion, I daresay the green dress will be worn over christmas (maybe…maybe not). I still wanted to share these dresses with you because, hey life throws us a few wadders sometimes…until soon.

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Vogue 1359: DIY Bottle Green Velvet Dress

 

 

Jalie 3461 Eleonore Pull On Jeans: DIY Mustard Jeggings

Jalie Eleonore Pull on Jeans: DIY Mustard Jeggings worn with Grainline Archer Shirt
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Jalie Eleonore Pull on Jeans: DIY Mustard Jeggings worn with Grainline Archer Shirt

Hi There,

The focus of todays post is my new jeggings, made using Jalie 3461; the Eleonore Pull-On Jeans pattern. But I also want to mention that I am wearing my jeggings with a new Grainline Archer shirt, made from a checked brushed cotton. This is the third time of me making the Archer and you can see the first two versions here and here. The only thing I changed with the current version is that I added 1 inch to the length.

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Jalie Eleonore Pull on Jeans: DIY Mustard Jeggings worn with Grainline Archer Shirt

Back to the jeggings. I guess you either love jeggings or hate them. I personally wear jeggings an awful lot on a day to day basis. I mean, for me they are smarter and more flattering than a legging, but more comfortable than jeans can sometimes be. Plus, I never wear my tops tucked into my waistband so I don’t mind the elasticated waistband (I must be getting old!!) I have no problem buy RTW jeggings, but when I saw the great versions of Eleonore that were popping up (like Dawn’s and Deepika’s) I ordered the pattern and used some stretch cotton twill I had in my stash to whip these up. Let’s consider these a wearable muslin.

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Jalie Eleonore Pull on Jeans: DIY Mustard Jeggings worn with Grainline Archer Shirt

The fit of these jeggings is not perfect. I think on my next pair I will shorten the length of the leg above the knee (and add it back at the ankle?), slim the inner thighs down, raise the crotch slightly and possibly move the pockets down a smidge.Any other suggestions?

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Jalie Eleonore Pull on Jeans: back pocket topstitching and rivets

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Jalie Eleonore Pull on Jeans: inside waistband

One thing to note: I raised the waistband on these by 2 inches and they sit comfortably around my natural waist. I am 5 foot 3 so if you are making these I would say think about if you will be happy with the low rise as they come. Overall they are very comfortable but some tweaking needs to be done. Check out the review below for all the details.

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Jalie Eleonore Pull on Jeans: DIY Mustard Jeggings worn with Grainline Archer Shirt

Pattern Review

Pattern Description:

Stretch pull-on jeans (long or cropped) with wide waistband.

  • Yoke, faux fly in the front, patch pockets in the back
  • Fitted through waist and hips, straight from the knee down
  • Very easy to turn into skinny jeans!

Pattern Sizing:

27 sizes included in the pattern from girls through to plus size women.

Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?

Yes, but I made mine more of a skinny leg jegging

Were the instructions easy to follow?

Yes…but….minor gripe…the instructions as provided are dotted around all over the (large) pattern sheet. I know you can download the instructions but….!

What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?

I love the finished product is so close to my RTW jeggings in appearance. I think with a few more fitting tweaks these will be perfect. The minor quibbles I have with this pattern are no lengthen/ shorten lines, the lack of an instruction sheet (the instructions of course are there but dotted around the pattern sheet), no pattern envelope provided and you are told to hem the jeggings before completing the waistband…hmm…not sure about that last point…risky I say.

Fabric Used:

Cotton twill with ?2%? elastane.

Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:

I cut the size according to my hip size (I didn’t size up) but I did have to ease a lot of fabric at the back on to the elastic to get the waist to fit without gaping due to the fact my waist is 2 sizes smaller than my hips. I purposefully cut the elastic shorter in the back to eliminate the gaping.

I added 2 inches to the rise at the front and back to get the waistband to hit at my natural waist.

I narrowed the leg by about 3 inches total in front and 2 inches total in back.

I removed 2 inches from the leg length.

I added additional topstitching on the pocket and inner leg seam and also added rivets.

I used the (larger) pockets from my Ginger Jeans pattern rather than the ones provided.

I turned 5/8ths inch over twice to hem.

Next time round I think I will shorten the length of the leg above the knee (and add it back at the ankle?), slim the inner thighs down, raise the crotch slightly and possibly move the pockets down a smidge.

Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?

Yes, definitely, although it is all a question of finding the perfect fabric. Sigh. Yes, I definitely recommend.

Conclusion:

Fast to sew, convincing to look at and comfortable to wear.

Have a great weekend. Looks like we are in for another wet and windy one!

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Jalie Eleonore Pull on Jeans: DIY Mustard Jeggings worn with Grainline Archer Shirt

 

Kwik Sew 3504: DIY Mens Corduroy Jeans

Kwik Sew 3504: DIY mens corduroy jeans

Hi Friends,

It’s been quite some time since I last made anything for my husband Philip. Well, now that fast has been broken as I made him some corduroy jeans using Kwik Sew 3504. This pattern is fairly well loved on the internet and as Phil is not keen on super skinny jeans this looked like a good option.

 

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Kwik Sew 3504: DIY mens corduroy jeans

Check out the review below for the full details. In essence I am very happy with how I made these jeans, but unfortunately Phil is not completely happy with the way they fit. They are too long in the rise from the crotch to the waistband, and when I (eventually!) make these again I am going to shorten the rise by 2 inches.

We all know black (and especially black on black) is hard to photograph but I have some detail shots to share. Even though it might not be terribly apparent I did all the topstitching/ bar tack details on these jeans using Gutterman topstitching thread.

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Kwik Sew 3504: DIY mens corduroy jeans – coin pocket detail

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Kwik Sew 3504: DIY mens corduroy jeans – back pocket detail

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Kwik Sew 3504: DIY mens corduroy jeans – fly detail

I used some left over cotton from my stash to make the pocket linings and matching bias binding which I used to bind the waistband and the left hand fly extension.

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Kwik Sew 3504: DIY mens corduroy jeans – waisband, inside fly and pocket bag detail

Pattern Review

Pattern Description:

Men’s jeans have fly zipper, waistband with belt carriers, back yoke, back patch pockets, front pockets, a coin pocket, and topstitching detail. View A legs are straight cut and View B are boot cut.

I made view A, but slimmed the legs down further than the pattern suggested.

Pattern Sizing:

S – XXL

The waistband on these were originally cut at a size L but I ended up removing a total of 2 inches from the waist before attaching the waistband and I also cut the legs as the size S. This was because I compared the width of the legs to a pair of RTW corduroys my husband has and the legs were much slimmer.

Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?

Yes.

Were the instructions easy to follow?

Very much so.

What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?

This is a great basic mens jeans pattern. There is nothing to dislike as such.

Fabric Used:

Corduroy.

Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:

As mentioned above I cut a size L for the waist, but removed 2 inches before attaching the waistband. I cut the legs following the size S line (to get a narrower leg).

I shortened the length of the leg by 3.5 inches.

I chose to bind the inside edge of the waistband using self made bias binding and stitched in the ditch from the outside rather than topstitching.

Next time round I will shorten the rise from the crotch to the waistband by 2 inches and also interface the waistband: the instructions do not tell you to do this but the waistband is not firm enough for Philip.

Some other notes:

I used the “With nap” layout (corduroy!)

I used a Schmetz size 90 needle for sewing (and in my overlocker). I used a 3 thread overlock to finish seams.

Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?

Yes. Sigh. I will have to make these again :-). Yes I definitely recommend, if for no other reason than in 17 concise steps this pattern takes you through making an entire pair of jeans, including installing the fly.

Conclusion:

This is a great pattern and I am very happy with my finish on these. My husband thinks the fit is off (too long in the rise), and that’s fine. I can alter the pattern for the next version.

Well, we have had a frost over night here and my daugher is disappointed we have not yet had snow. Yuck! Happy (warm) sewing….

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Kwik Sew 3504: DIY mens corduroy jeans

 

 

Butterick 5982: DIY Fit and Flare Party Dress

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Butterick 5982: DIY Fit and Flare Party Dress

Hi Friends,

As has become something of a tradition now, I made a dress for my birthday, which I celebrated yesterday with Philip and Kezia. We went to the City of York, toured a Viking museum, did some shopping, and stayed in a lovely country house hotel with good food and a swim this morning.

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Butterick 5982: DIY Fit and Flare Party Dress

It’s becoming increasingly difficult to photograph outdoors (with the weather and light being so poor) so these shots were taken inside our suite at the hotel. The pattern is Butterick 5982, and you can see my first version of this dress here. Quite a different effect, no? Just down to using a completely different fabric. This fabric, by the way, was purchased local to me, and is a lovely rich rayon/ poly jacquard. I pre-washed the fabric so it is easy to care for. It hardly creases, is warm but surprisingly lightweight and I think this dress will definitely see me through the upcoming festive season.

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Butterick 5982: DIY Fit and Flare Party Dress

You can read my original review on this pattern here. That review also details any changes I made to the pattern. But here are some brief notes specifically relating to this version:

  • This is view A with the boat neck bodice
  • I added 1 inch to the length of the back skirt, tapering to nothing at the sides, to account for shortening the back bodice by 1 inch
  • I finished the edges of the waist seam and the skirt using a 3 thread overlock finish
  • The dress is fully lined (polyester? acetate? lining). I cut the skirt lining 2 inches shorter than the dress skirt
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Butterick 5982: DIY Fit and Flare Party Dress Lining

  • I applied fusible interfacing to the zipper opening and used an invisible zip. This is probably my best invisible zip insertion ever.
  • I decided last minute to omit the sleeves from this version so I used the pattern pieces to draft 2 inch wide facings to finish the armholes. I took  1/4 inch to neaten the edges and used 3/8 inch only to sew the facings to the armhole. The facings are catch stitched by hand into place
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Butterick 5982: DIY Fit and Flare Party Dress – armhole facing

  • I did change the order of construction quite a bit. I sewed the bodice and bodice sides first. Then I attached the skirt. I then inserted the invisible zip. Then I sewed the bodice lining and attached the lining to the dress bodice at the neck and understitched. I then attached the skirt lining, machined the lining to the zipper tape, applied the armhole facing and finally sewed the hem by hand.

I really love my birthday dress! I felt comfortable but special in it and I definitely think I need an excuse to wear it again.

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Butterick 5982: DIY Fit and Flare Party Dress

Here’s one of my favourite pictures of the night:

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Me and My Girl

Until soon….

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