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My Sewing in 2016: a look back and some things you might have missed

Hi Friends,

Hope you all had a wonderful Christmas and are looking forward to the New Year.

I actually still have 2 unblogged items that I completed this year but I am not going to rush into blogging those before the year end. Instead, I wanted to take the opportunity to reflect on the items I have made this year and also share some items that those of you who are not on Instagram might have missed (because I felt they were not worthy of a blog post of their own).

It’s been another great year of sewing for me. I feel like my skills are improving and I am getting more practised at refining the fit of garments – that’s not to say I always get it right – because I don’t! I think I am also more confident in my own sense of style and picking patterns that I think might work on my body shape etc. So all in all, 2016 was a successful year for me.

Here is the complete breakdown (not including the two unblogged items) with some pictures of things that have appeared on the blog before, as well as some pictures of items I shared on my Instagram account.

  • 4 coats – including one for Kezia. These are probably my most favourite items of all the things I have sewn. I have to wear a coat of some kind most days for at least 9 – 10 months of the year and reaching for these items makes me happy. I really enjoy coat making.

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  • 2 blazers – both huge learning curves for me. One was a hand tailored wool blazer and one was a wool ponte blazer constructed using fusible interfacings.
  • 2 jackets – one made from Linton tweed and fully lined (that was worn lots when travelling on planes in America) and one unlined kimono style.
  • 3 pairs of pull on jeans made using the Jalie Elenore pattern (my red pair got worn loads – see below for picture. My black pair are in the donate pile – fabric didn’t have enough stretch to make them comfortable).
  • 3 pairs of pants made using Simplicity 1167 – this pattern has become my go to pants pattern – for now. So proud of myself for making pants that fit ME!
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Simplicity 1167 pants

  • 2 pairs of culotte style trousers.
  • 2 skirts, both made using Simplicity 8019. I made a version in suede leather and then this (unblogged) denim version, which has gotten a fair amount of wear.
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Simplicity 8019 denim button front skirt worn with plaid Grainline Archer shirt

  • 1 pair of workout leggings
  • 5 shirts – including one made for Philip’s big birthday and a floral Grainline Archer made for myself from some soft cotton voile type fabric I purchased a few years ago in Paris that I LOVE wearing.
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McCalls 6613 striped shirt

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McCalls 6613 striped shirt

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Grainline Archer floral shirt worn with Jalie Eleonore pull on jeans

  • 11 further tops/ blouses/ workout top, including this modified McCalls 6886 breton style top. Sadly this has also just gone into the donate pile on account of the fabric not washing very well. It’s a shame as I LOVE the first breton top I made using this pattern and it still gets regularly worn (in a black and white stripe). Need to find the perfect fabric to make more!
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McCalls 6886 modified into colour block yoke breton style top

  • 2 cardigans
  • 4 shirt dresses

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  • 6 further dresses – one of which was a wadder. The wadder was  my attempt at turning the True Bias Sutton blouse into a dress with an elasticated waist. I made the top part way too blousey and I ended  up chopping the dress apart before giving up on it completely.

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True Bias Sutton Dress – wadder!

  • A gymnastics outfit for Kezia
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Erbsenprinzessin leotard – fabric purchased from Spandex house, NYC

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Erbsenprinzessin leotard (modified) and e+m leggings (modified to shorts)

  • 2 pairs of cotton pyjamas – made using Simplicity 2317. These have been washed and worn and washed and worn. I hope to make more (and more luxurious) versions next year.
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Two versions of OOP Simplicity 2317

  • 2 refashions: a blouse of mine which I no longer wanted refashioned into a top for Kezia and a denim peplum jacket made from 2 pairs of old jeans.
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Refashioned top into a top for kezia

  • 1 baby dress and pantaloons

Phew! Quite the list. I am proud and happy of all I have achieved this year 🙂

What does 2017 hold? I am not one to tie myself down with challenges/ resolutions or even firm plans. I like to run wild and free, haha. But….

  • More coats: a waterproof Kelly anorak, a trench coat of some kind and another blazer (still need to find my perfect one in terms of fit and style!)
  • Workout tops in the supplex I purchased in America this year
  • More pants! Maybe another pattern?
  • Feel like I need some new tops to freshen my wardrobe up.

Not going to think beyond that. I like to draw up a more specific list up about 3 or 4 times a year and edit as I go along.

So all that remains is for me to say a huge THANK YOU to all of my followers and to all of you who read my blog and comment. It’s great to be part of this community and also it was great to meet some of you in real life and make new friends. Actually, that’s something I hope I get more chance to do next year. I wish all of you health, happiness, peace and prosperity for the new year. Happy and fruitful sewing!

 

 

 

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Kwik Sew 3504: DIY Mens Corduroy Jeans

Hi Friends,

It’s been quite some time since I last made anything for my husband Philip. Well, now that fast has been broken as I made him some corduroy jeans using Kwik Sew 3504. This pattern is fairly well loved on the internet and as Phil is not keen on super skinny jeans this looked like a good option.

 

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Kwik Sew 3504: DIY mens corduroy jeans

Check out the review below for the full details. In essence I am very happy with how I made these jeans, but unfortunately Phil is not completely happy with the way they fit. They are too long in the rise from the crotch to the waistband, and when I (eventually!) make these again I am going to shorten the rise by 2 inches.

We all know black (and especially black on black) is hard to photograph but I have some detail shots to share. Even though it might not be terribly apparent I did all the topstitching/ bar tack details on these jeans using Gutterman topstitching thread.

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Kwik Sew 3504: DIY mens corduroy jeans – coin pocket detail

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Kwik Sew 3504: DIY mens corduroy jeans – back pocket detail

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Kwik Sew 3504: DIY mens corduroy jeans – fly detail

I used some left over cotton from my stash to make the pocket linings and matching bias binding which I used to bind the waistband and the left hand fly extension.

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Kwik Sew 3504: DIY mens corduroy jeans – waisband, inside fly and pocket bag detail

Pattern Review

Pattern Description:

Men’s jeans have fly zipper, waistband with belt carriers, back yoke, back patch pockets, front pockets, a coin pocket, and topstitching detail. View A legs are straight cut and View B are boot cut.

I made view A, but slimmed the legs down further than the pattern suggested.

Pattern Sizing:

S – XXL

The waistband on these were originally cut at a size L but I ended up removing a total of 2 inches from the waist before attaching the waistband and I also cut the legs as the size S. This was because I compared the width of the legs to a pair of RTW corduroys my husband has and the legs were much slimmer.

Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?

Yes.

Were the instructions easy to follow?

Very much so.

What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?

This is a great basic mens jeans pattern. There is nothing to dislike as such.

Fabric Used:

Corduroy.

Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:

As mentioned above I cut a size L for the waist, but removed 2 inches before attaching the waistband. I cut the legs following the size S line (to get a narrower leg).

I shortened the length of the leg by 3.5 inches.

I chose to bind the inside edge of the waistband using self made bias binding and stitched in the ditch from the outside rather than topstitching.

Next time round I will shorten the rise from the crotch to the waistband by 2 inches and also interface the waistband: the instructions do not tell you to do this but the waistband is not firm enough for Philip.

Some other notes:

I used the “With nap” layout (corduroy!)

I used a Schmetz size 90 needle for sewing (and in my overlocker). I used a 3 thread overlock to finish seams.

Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?

Yes. Sigh. I will have to make these again :-). Yes I definitely recommend, if for no other reason than in 17 concise steps this pattern takes you through making an entire pair of jeans, including installing the fly.

Conclusion:

This is a great pattern and I am very happy with my finish on these. My husband thinks the fit is off (too long in the rise), and that’s fine. I can alter the pattern for the next version.

Well, we have had a frost over night here and my daugher is disappointed we have not yet had snow. Yuck! Happy (warm) sewing….

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Kwik Sew 3504: DIY mens corduroy jeans

 

 

New Look 6225: DIY easy cotton summer top

New Look 6225: easy cotton top

New Look 6225: easy cotton top

Hi Readers,

I promised last time I have 2 summer tops left to blog about: here’s the first. It hardly seems worth blogging about, being as it is so simple, but hey, it might be useful to someone.

New Look 6225 is a simple pull on top designed to be made in light weight wovens. It features raglan sleeves in three different lengths and can be made into a longer tunic length top with side slits (as I’ve made) or a shorter length. It’s one of those patterns where the fabric has to be the star. This fabric doesn’t have much star quality. I mean, it’s a pretty coral colour, but it’s just a plain lawn. I added the ruffled corsage thing to jazz things up and a box pleat to the centre front (which I wish I had made a bit bigger).

I made the ruffled corsage thing out of bias strips which I just had pleated and sewed directly on to the top. All very…organic. I left the edges raw (just sewed a line of stitching next to the edges to stop complete disintegration).

New Look 6225: easy cotton top - close up of corsage

New Look 6225: easy cotton top – close up of corsage

This top comes together so easily. I french seamed everything.

New Look 6225: easy cotton top

New Look 6225: easy cotton top

New Look 6225: easy cotton top

New Look 6225: easy cotton top

The raw edges at the neck are enclosed with bias binding. It’s the neatest binding I have ever sewn!

New Look 6225: easy cotton top - close up of binding

New Look 6225: easy cotton top – close up of binding

I know Beth just did a post on a woven top that she made and she said she wasn’t happy with the fit on the arms. I do wear woven tops like shirts and blouses. It’s the first time I have made a style like this. And I am actually very happy with the fit. It is very comfortable. I wore it for a day to an amusement park and it allowed me to go on all the rides and not feel restricted in the slightest. Maybe it would be different with the longer length sleeves?

Pattern Review:

Pattern Description:

Misses’ woven tee shirt has scoop neck, can be made with three-quarter, short or cap sleeves. Change it up with contrast sleeves & neck band or make it your favorite go-to top in lace.

Pattern Sizing:

8 – 20

Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?

Yes.

Were the instructions easy to follow?

Yes.

What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?

Very simple to sew. Good fit (for me at least). Good basic woven top/ tunic that allows lots of customisation. Nothing to dislike as such.

Fabric Used:

Cotton lawn.

Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:

After doing a tissue fit I decided to move the bust darts down by 1.5 inches. After sewing it in fabric I think they need to be raised by around 0.5 inches if  I were to sew this again.

I increased the length of the side slits by approx. 2 inches. More comfortable for me.

Approx. 1 inch sway back adjustment.

I added a ruffled fabric corsage made out of pleated bias strips of fabric.

I added a box pleat to the centre front.

Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?

Possibly and yes.

Conclusion:

Good basic pattern to have in your stash. Once you’ve perfected the fit sew it in something luxurious!

New Look 6225: easy cotton top

New Look 6225: easy cotton top

Finally, it was Philip’s birthday last week so I made him a shirt. A third version of McCalls 6613. (If it ain’t broke….version 1, version2). The fabric was picked up in Paris last year. This cotton is probably not at all suitable for shirt making. It is too thin and I wasn’t able to get a perfect match on the checks. However, I used a double layer of interfacing at the collar and something was made. He wore it, seemed to like it, another point scored on the selfless sewing front. Comparing the collar to the previous versions this one is the best yet.

McCalls 6613

McCalls 6613

McCalls 6613

McCalls 6613

So that’s all for now. Back soon. Until then…

Simplicity 2479: DIY mens quilted body warmer vest

Simplicity 2479 DIY mens quilted bodywarmer vest

Simplicity 2479 DIY mens quilted bodywarmer vest

The only handmade Christmas present I am making this year is finished. This is a quilted mens bodywarmer for my husband Philip, made using Simplicity 2479.

Simplicity 2479 DIY mens quilted bodywarmer vest

Simplicity 2479 DIY mens quilted bodywarmer vest

This is such a versatile pattern. Not only are patterns included for men and boys in one envelope, but you also have a choice of two different necklines, two different closure options, shoulder patches, back tabs and 5 different pockets. There is no limit to what you could do with this pattern, and it is also a fairly simple pattern to work with. I went with view B, with a metallic zipper front V-neck, shoulder patches in corduroy and patch pockets with corduroy flaps and brass snaps to finish. The main body of the bodywarmer is a water resistant quilted fabric and it is fully lined with ex-Barbour fleece.

Simplicity 2479 line drawings

Simplicity 2479 line drawings

Simplicity 2479 DIY mens quilted bodywarmer vest

Simplicity 2479 DIY mens quilted bodywarmer vest

A couple of things I wanted to specifically mention: the pattern calls for a 22 inch separating zipper. I went with a YKK antique brass finish zipper. I mentioned a few posts ago that after doing some reading on the internet, I came to the conclusion that YKK are the best quality zipper you can buy. Well, it so happened that I ended up with two identical zippers for this project; one YKK and one not. I had to shorten the zipper (in the end by approx. 2 inches). Here’s a picture:

Removal of approx. 2 inches of metal teeth using pliers

Removal of approx. 2 inches of metal teeth using pliers

Let me tell you that it was much harder (although not impossible) to remove the teeth from the YKK zipper. Which leads me to conclude that YKK zippers are built to last! In fact, it was impossible for me to remove the YKK zipper stop at the end of the tape and in the end I removed the zipper stop from the non YKK zip and put that on the YKK zip.

The other thing I wanted to mention was that I removed the wadding from the seam allowances, and trimmed seams down well:

Removing wadding from seam allowances

Removing wadding from seam allowances

Here are some close up shots:

Simplicity 2479 pocket/ snap/ lining detail

Simplicity 2479 pocket/ snap/ lining detail

Simplicity 2479 pocket/ snap/ zipper detail

Simplicity 2479 pocket/ snap/ zipper detail

Simplicity 2479 DIY mens quilted bodywarmer vest

Simplicity 2479 DIY mens quilted bodywarmer vest

Pattern Review:

Pattern Description:

Men’s and boys’ vest sewing pattern with pocket variations. I made view B with pockets from view A.

Pattern Sizing:

S – L boys and S – XL mens. I cut the size M.

Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?

Yes, although this is one of those Project Runway inspired patterns which is really only limited by your imagination.

Were the instructions easy to follow?

Yes, but I did scratch my head a little about how to sew the sides up. I got it in the end. It does involve hand sewing the lining shut which I generally don’t like, but my lining is a fleece so the hand stitching is not that noticeable.

What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?

I love the finished garment (and so does my husband). I love all the potential variations. There is nothing to dislike as such.

Fabric Used:

A prequilted water resistant fabric for the outer shell. Ex-barbour fleece lining. An antique brass finish metal zipper. Corduroy for the shoulder patches and patch pocket flaps. Brass snaps.

Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:

No alterations except for I lined the pockets with the fleece (isn’t men’s sewing easy?!) The fleece does peek out a little around the edges of the pocket but I like it. I did stay stitch the neckline as instructed, but wish I had added some twill tape for more stability. It is gaping ever so slightly.

Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?

Not sure I would sew it again but I would definitely recommend it.

Conclusion:

Simple pattern with great variations. It’s a great easy gift pattern to have on hand.

Simplicity 2479 DIY mens quilted bodywarmer vest

Simplicity 2479 DIY mens quilted bodywarmer vest

Happy christmas everyone!

 

 

 

Cynthia Rowley Pattern Simplicity 2215: happy fathers day!

Simplicity 2215 linen mix dress

Simplicity 2215 linen mix dress

Happy fathers day to all fathers out there. Hope you are all having a great day. And no, in case you are wondering, I am not just celebrating fathers day by making a new dress for myself 🙂 Phil also got a new shirt. Another version of McCalls 6613, this time in a grey cotton denim. And for me, I made Simplicity 2215.

McCalls 6613 cotton demin shirt

McCalls 6613 cotton demin shirt

McCalls 6613 cotton demin shirt

McCalls 6613 cotton demin shirt

Ok, and now back to me please! 🙂

Simplicity 2215: linen mix dress

Simplicity 2215 linen mix dress

We are supposed to be going on holiday in 2 weeks time. I say supposed because we have not actually booked anything. But we ARE going. Probably somewhere hot with a pool and lots of nice seafood. Yum. Anyway, this is a dress I made in a linen/ viscose mix which will hopefully be suitable for said holiday. The colour definitely puts you in the holiday mood. I think turquoise is one of those summer only colours.

I love how the dress feels. It feels – ahem – well made. I fully lined the dress with a very soft, open weave poly cotton. The linen viscose fabric, which I purchased from my local market, has a good weight to it, but still feels light.

Simplicity 2215 back view

Simplicity 2215 back view

Here’s a close up of the buttons and I also added a belt which I sewed in to the sides of the dress.

Simplicity 2215 close up of buttons

Simplicity 2215 close up of buttons

Simplicity 2215 close up of sewn in belt

Simplicity 2215 close up of sewn in belt

The hem is left unfinished. It’s like a double hem, with an additional border strip added to the lower portion of the dress which is then left unfinished. I quite like the effect. I don’t know how it’s going to wash though!

Simplicity 2215 close up of raw finish hem

Simplicity 2215 close up of raw finish hem

Pattern Review:

Pattern Description:

Misses’ & Miss petite dress, skirt and blouse by Cynthia Rowley.

Pattern Sizing:

14 – 22

Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?

Yes, except I added a belt which was sewn in to the sides of the  bodice.

Were the instructions easy to follow?

Yes.

What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?

I like the overall shape of the dress and the raw finish at the hem. However, I prefer the look of the dress with the belt, otherwise I think it is quite loose at the waist.

Fabric Used:

Linen viscose mix.

Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:

Based on the pattern measurements I cut a size larger than usual for the bodice and graded out a size at the waist. The bodice fits fine, but there was some gaping at the armholes. I don’t know if I should actually be cutting a size smaller and then doing a FBA. I am hoping to go through a fitting course on Craftsy soon, so hope to be able to resolve this or at least discover how to rectify it.

I shortened the bodice by 1 3/8″.

I added a belt which I sewed in to the bodice sides. I don’t know if perhaps adding this belt had the effect of stretching the armholes out somewhat?

I raised the armholes slightly.

I fully lined the dress.

I omitted the pockets and the side zip.

I serged the lower band to the hem rather than sewing it and turning the raw edges in.

Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?

I do like it, but I don’t know if I would sew it again myself. I would recommend to others.

Conclusion:

This is a cute summer dress that I enjoyed sewing. It’s flattering, comfortable and perfect for a hot summer holiday!

Simplicity 2215 linen mix dress

Simplicity 2215 linen mix dress

DIY men’s shirt McCalls 6613: conquering (another) sewing fear

McCalls 6613 men's shirt

McCalls 6613 men’s shirt

Readers, this is my husband, Philip. Philip, meet my readers. They are a very nice lot!

Introductions over, today I want to share with you that I have conquered another sewing fear: sewing a tailored man’s shirt. This is the first shirt I have ever sewn, so prepare to be bored to death with the details (I am understandably very proud of myself). And how did I accomplish this you may ask? With the help of the A-M-A-Z-I-N-G Pamela Howard and her Craftsy Classic Tailored Shirt lessons. I bought these lessons during the recent valentines sale, and they are worth every penny IMHO.

So what do you get for your money?

Well, you get 12 lessons, ranging from between 10 minutes and 30 seconds in length to 1 hour and 5 minutes in length, introduced by Pam herself, and her soft, hypnotic voice. Yoooouuu wiiiiilllll beeee abbllleee toooo dooooo ittttt.

Whilst a pattern is not included in the price of this course, Pam does give suggestions for patterns to use, namely Kwik Sew 3555 (which she makes during the tutorials), Kwik Sew 3027 (a darted ladies shirt), Kwik Sew 3586 (plus size ladies shirt) and Kwik Sew 3422 (a men’s version). I had actually bought my shirt pattern before I purchased the Craftsy tutorials, so I used McCalls 6613, a unisex men’s/ women’s shirt….more on the specifics of that pattern later.

After introducing herself, Pam talks through the anatomy of a shirt, including adjusting the seam allowances for the Kwik Sew patterns mentioned above, as these patterns only have a 1/4″ seam allowance, and you have to add 3/8″ to them to get your final 5/8″ seam allowance (worth bearing that in mind if you are lazy, like me :-)). Pam then demonstrates laying out and cutting out the shirt pieces, including how to lay the pattern pieces on grain. She even gives tips on the best way to hold your scissors to make cutting out easier and more accurate…these are tips you just don’t get from books!

Note that there is a 10 minute 30 second lesson on “shirt front options”, which covers sewing darts (for the ladies), a 19 minute 20 second lesson on sleeve plackets and cuffs and a 22 minute lesson on pleats and cuffs, all of which I omitted as they didn’t apply to the style of shirt I was making. This is the advantage of the Craftsy platform, I have lifetime access to do back and view these lessons any time I want too.

Pam shows you how to sew your front bands (note that the McCalls pattern I was using had separate front band pieces – see my review below, but I just sewed these on using the instructions from the pattern, then followed on with Pam). Pam also shows you how to accurately create and sew a patch pocket, how to sew the shirt back and shoulders, including a brilliant yoke trick (I believe it  may also be called the burrito method?), which avoids the need for any hand sewing and leaves a neat, completely enclosed finish.

There is a lengthy lesson on sewing the collar and band, which will ensure you end up with professional, accurate results. Actually, this lesson contained the only thing I didn’t like: Pam suggests hand sewing the folded under edge of the collar/ band unit to the shirt to enclose the raw edges. I chose to machine stitch this part. Pam also shows you how to insert the sleeves in flat, and then using a flat fell seam to finish the sleeve and side seams.

Other things which Pam covers in the lessons include how to drape fit the shirt and even how to give your finished shirt a final press.

Can you tell how impressed I am with this set of lessons?! Philip is very proud of the shirt I have made for him and I actually really enjoyed making it!. So huge thumbs up from me. This is a completely independent review that I have chosen to write and it is my honest opinion!

Now on to the McCalls pattern and the details of my shirt….

McCalls 6613 rear view - note pleat in back piece

McCalls 6613 rear view – note pleat in back piece

McCalls 6613 side view

McCalls 6613 side view

Pattern Review

Pattern Description:

MISSES’/MEN’S SHIRTS: Fitted (men) shirts have collar, collar/front bands, self-lined yoke, forward shoulder seams, and narrow hem. A: stitched hem on sleeves. B: flaps, pleated pockets, opening for pen/pencil. C: bias front band/pockets, snap closings. B, C, D: long, two-piece sleeves with pleats, button cuffs (seam opening). B, C: rolled sleeves (wrong side shows). Collar, collar band, yoke, tabs B, C, cuffs B, C, D: cut on crosswise grain of fabric.

I chose to make view A, but with the curved shirt tail hem as per views C and D.

Pattern Sizing:

SML – LRG

Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?

Yes, I think it does.

Were the instructions easy to follow?

Well, here is my complaint about this pattern. I bought this pattern because it is a Palmer and Pletsch pattern for McCalls, and I was hoping the instructions would really excel. Whilst the instructions do make adjusting the pattern easy (adjustment lines are indicated on the pattern e.g. to do a FBA, sway back adjustment, rounded shoulder etc), the instructions DO NOT allow you to create a tailored shirt. That is why I disregarded the instructions completely and used Pam Howard’s Craftsy Classic Tailored Shirt tutorials, which I HIGHLY recommend. If you followed these pattern instructions you would end up with a shirt which would need to have seams finished e.g. serged and the sleeves would not be inserted flat but eased in – you would not end up with a men’s shirt as you would find in RTW.

What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?

See above! Also, things to note is that the front bands for this shirt are cut SEPARATELY from the shirt fronts, on the bias, interfaced, and then attached to the shirt fronts. I can see how this makes more of a design feature of the front bands e.g. if you use a plaid, but if you don’t want this extra step then you probably should avoid this pattern. Also, there is no separate undercollar piece (do I sound like I know what I am talking about?! This is all thanks to the Classic Tailored Shirt lessons!). I cut the undercollar about 1/8″ smaller than the upper collar to allow for turn of cloth.

Fabric Used:

A checked cotton from my local market. I also used Vlieseline H250 for the interfacing….it seems ok, but I would love to know what anyone else uses for shirts?

Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:

Absolutely none. This was really a wearable muslin to see how to fit the husband, and it fits fine. The only thing I would change next time is to add maybe an inch or two to the length of the sleeves.

Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?

Yes and yes.

Conclusion:

So very proud of my first ever shirt, but couldn’t have done it without the Craftsy course!

McCalls 6613

McCalls 6613 – note I have not sewn on the buttons at the collar as I need to get slightly smaller ones for there

McCalls 6613 - I have to highlight my machine sewn on buttons - the first time ever I have used this feature on my machine.

McCalls 6613 – I have to highlight my machine sewn on buttons – the first time ever I have used this feature on my machine.

McCalls 6613 - one happy customer!

McCalls 6613 – one happy customer!

So readers, what are your greatest sewing fears, and how are you going to tackle them? I know Victoria from the Ten Thousand Hours blogspot and Karen from Did You Make That (with her Sewlutions) are helping lots of you face your fears, but I would still love to hear. Until later….

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