Tag Archive | butterick 6331

Pauline Alice Eliana Top and Butterick 6331: DIY Gauze Peasant Style Top and White Denim Boyfriend Style Jeans: Stylish Fabric

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Pauline Alice Eliana Dress modified to top and Butterick 6331 White Denim Boyfriend Style Jeans. All fabric from Stylish Fabric.

Hi All,

Today I am so excited to share a perfect summer outfit made using fabrics from L.A based Stylish Fabric. They got in touch with me recently and asked if I wanted to try out some of their fabrics. The fabrics in this post were provided at no cost to me, but as ever, my opinions are my own.

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Pauline Alice Eliana Dress modified to top.

The blouse was made using this gorgeous cotton and rayon gauze in blush colour. This fabric is delicious to wear and was easy to sew. I was expecting it to fray like mad, but it didn’t. I overlocked all my seam allowances. One thing I would say to watch out for is that I think this fabric shrunk quite a bit in the wash (unless I wasn’t sent as much as I initally thought?) I asked for 3 yards but I think I had about 2 yards (?) to play with. So, yep, not sure why that was. But, no matter, I ended up with a beautiful blouse that I will be happy to wear in hot weather.

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Pauline Alice Eliana Dress modified to top and Butterick 6331 White Denim Boyfriend Style Jeans. All fabric from Stylish Fabric.

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Pauline Alice Eliana Dress modified to top and Butterick 6331 White Denim Boyfriend Style Jeans. All fabric from Stylish Fabric.

The jeans are made using this white denim (currently 60% off). This non-stretch denim is the perfect weight for denim jeans, and is, I would say, ever so slightly off white. It washed, pressed and sewed beautifully. I used a Schmetz jeans needle and Gutterman top stitching thread, even though you can’t of course see the details. Full details on patterns below.

Top:

  • Made using Pauline Alice Eliana Dress pattern modified to top length. You can see my first version of the top hack here.
  • Moved the bust dart up by 1 inch.
  • Added 3/8ths inch to side seams at hip.
  • Made narrower self bias tape to bind the neckline and sleeve openings.

Jeans:

  • Made using Butterick 6331. See first version of these pants here and my floral version here.
  • These white denim jeans were actually version number 2, so see my first version for details of pattern amendments. Even though I didn’t make any alterations to the pattern from version number 1, these feel very different. Amazing what changing the fabric can do. These are boyfriend style, so fairly loose fitting, but still quite slim I think.
  • I essentially followed the Closet Case Ginger Jeans instructions to make these.
  • Interfaced the fly.
  • Omitted interfacing in the waistband.
  • Used lining fabric for the pocket bags to cut down on bulk.
  • Added back pockets, fly shield and topstitching.
  • Extended length of waistband by about 5 inches (much better to have too much length IMO that can be shortened as required).

Thanks to Stylish Fabric for the opportunity to add some really versatile pieces to my wardrobe. Sometimes plain basics can be the most valuable thing you can make!

Happy sewing!

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Pauline Alice Eliana Dress modified to top and Butterick 6331 White Denim Boyfriend Style Jeans. All fabric from Stylish Fabric.

 

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Butterick 6331 and Simplicity 2446: DIY Floral Twill Trouser Suit made using Spoonflower Fabric

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Butterick 6331 trouser and Simplicity 2446 blazer – made using Jungle Passion floral navy lightweight cotton twill from Spoonflower. Worn with white cotton Grainline Archer.

Hi Friends,

No, I am not entering a Chris Evans look-alike contest (British reference there). Today’s post features fabric kindly sent to me by Spoonflower. I am sure many of you have already heard of the eco-friendly custom printing firm. About 1.5 years ago they opened a second factory in Berlin, and to celebrate they asked a few British bloggers to be part of a Blog Tour, and make items using Spoonflower fabric. You can see the list of bloggers here on the Spoonflower Blog. The fabric I have used in this post was sent to me for no charge by Spoonflower, but all opinions are my own.

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Butterick 6331 trouser and Simplicity 2446 blazer – made using Jungle Passion floral navy lightweight cotton twill from Spoonflower.

I have never ordered fabric from Spoonflower before. The choice of already uploaded designs on the Spoonflower website is vast (of course the option is also there to upload your own design), and somewhat overwhelming. I searched using key words of prints I have a passion for (like dark florals), and elected to go for Jungle Passion Floral Navy by Joan McLemore, printed on to the lightweight cotton twill (58″ width).

Because of my own indecision, Spoonflower ended up sending me this fabric in two separate lengths but I was not able to detect any differences in the colours between the two lengths. I think the colours are a pretty good match to what was shown on screen when I was making my selection. I also liked the fact that, at least for the design I selected, previews were provided of the fabric made up into a cushion and a dress, so I could guage the scale of the print.

I did run the fabrics through a hot (60 degree) pre-wash before cutting out and did not notice any running, bleeding or fading. This particular fabric was easy to cut, sew and press. It’s a good weight without being too heavy and bulky. Full disclosure: will I ever wear these two pieces together? Probably not, but as separates in my wardrobe I love them and how individual and quirky they are. I already have lots of things which these items will go with.

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Butterick 6331 trouser and Simplicity 2446 blazer – made using Jungle Passion floral navy lightweight cotton twill from Spoonflower.

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Butterick 6331 trouser and Simplicity 2446 blazer – made using Jungle Passion floral navy lightweight cotton twill from Spoonflower.

Some details:

The trousers were made using Butterick 6331. This is actually my third iteration of these pants (I haven’t shown you version two yet), but you can see my first version here. For this version I took on board what some of you said in the comments and scooped out the back crotch by 0.25 inches and added 0.5 inches to the upper back thigh. I know it’s hard to see in this busy print but overall I think it’s better. Other changes for this version:

  • I fully interfaced the waistband.
  • I had to let the side seams out a touch from the waist down to the bottom of the pockets.
  • I hemmed the bottoms by hand.
  • These are trousers but with some jeans details like additional topstitching, jeans button and bar tacks.
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Butterick 6331 Floral Twill Trousers – made using Jungle Passion floral navy lightweight cotton twill from Spoonflower. Topstitching detail.

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Butterick 6331 Floral Twill Trousers – made using Jungle Passion floral navy lightweight cotton twill from Spoonflower. Inside view of waistband and (modified) fly facing.

The blazer was made using Simplicity 2446, which I first made in wool ponte. I do love my first version, and since going back to work, have worn it a few times. But the shoulders are too big (although I did go back and alter them to be smaller). So for this version I made sure to do a small shoulder adjustment.

  • I did a 5/8ths inch small shoulder adjustment.
  • I shaved 0.25 inches off all the shoulder princess seams above the bust.
  • I added a centre back seam for shaping.
  • I shortened the pocket bag length by 1.5 inches.
  • I added small ready made shoulder pads but omitted sleeve heads and chest reinforcement.
  • You can see a picture of the internal interfacing here on Instagram if you want.

My previous two blazers have taken me approx. 3 weeks each to make: I slaved over this blazer to get it done in a week! Gosh it was tough but overall I am pretty happy with the finished result.

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Simplicity 2446 Floral Twill Blazer – made using Jungle Passion floral navy lightweight cotton twill from Spoonflower.

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Simplicity 2446 Floral Twill Blazer – made using Jungle Passion floral navy lightweight cotton twill from Spoonflower. Front lapel detail.

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Simplicity 2446 Floral Twill Blazer – made using Jungle Passion floral navy lightweight cotton twill from Spoonflower. Welt pocket with flap detail.

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Simplicity 2446 Floral Twill Blazer – made using Jungle Passion floral navy lightweight cotton twill from Spoonflower. Welt pocket detail.

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Simplicity 2446 Floral Twill Blazer – made using Jungle Passion floral navy lightweight cotton twill from Spoonflower. Sleeve vent detail.

Like I say, being honest, I don’t think I would be brave enough to go full on head to toe pattern,  but as individual pieces I think these are going to get worn lots. I am also very proud of how far I have come on with my sewing techniques tackling things like the welt pockets and sleeve vents and even the trouser fitting and sewing.

Happy sewing everyone!

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Butterick 6331 trouser and Simplicity 2446 blazer – made using Jungle Passion floral navy lightweight cotton twill from Spoonflower.

 

 

Butterick 6331: DIY Pale Pink Trousers

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Butterick 6331 trousers in bengaline (worn with blue denim Grainline Archer shirt)

Friends,

Pink is having a moment in the fashion world apparently, and so I found some cheap pink bengaline online to make a wearable muslin of Butterick 6331 (remember, I made the trench from this pattern a few weeks back?)

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Butterick 6331 trousers in bengaline

As ever, full review below, but overall I like these. This trouser pattern is a useful one to have in the stash because it is intended for woven, non-stretch fabrics and is an easy sew. It has a back yoke (so essentially it is a basic jeans pattern), front pockets and tapered legs. In fact, I have already made these again in a white denim as a boyfriend style jeans (you can see a sneak peak here on Instagram). Here’s the dreaded back view:

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Butterick 6331 trousers in bengaline

There are some diagonal lines under the bottom: I am no pants fitting expert but I have removed a tiny bit of width from the inner back leg and scooped a tiny bit out of the back crotch for next time (any experts please chime in!)

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Butterick 6331 trousers in bengaline

Pattern Review

Pattern Description:

Loose-fitting, unlined, double-breasted jacket has notched collar, side-front seams and pockets, belt loops, back button shield, elasticized back casing, tie ends, stitched hems, two-piece, rolled raglan sleeves (wrong side shows). A: Below elbow sleeves and button tabs. Semi-fitted, tapered pants (slightly below waist) have waistband, belt loops, side-front pockets, yoke back, and mock-fly zipper. C: Cropped.

I made view D.

Pattern Sizing:

6 – 22

Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?

Yes.

Were the instructions easy to follow?

Yes.

What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?

I like that the pattern is intended for non-stretch woven fabrics and is essentially a jeans pattern, with a back yoke, pockets and tapered legs. Nothing to dislike, although I will add a fly shield next time round.

Fabric Used:

A pink bengaline which actually has lengthwise stretch. I stitched the crotch seam using my stretch stitch to prevent any stitching from popping.

Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:

  • 2.75 inch full butt adjustment.
  • Removed 1 inch in length from above the knee.
  • Changed the straight waistband to a contoured waistband and interfaced both sides.
  • Interfaced zipper area.
  • Slimmed leg seams down slightly once sewn by removing 0.5 inch from the side front and back seams below the knee.
  • Removed 3 inches from the length.

Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?

Really, this was a wearable muslin and I have already sewn this up again as boyfriend style white denim jeans. Review coming soon! Yes I recommend.

Conclusion:

Quick to make and very easy to wear. I like the smart, casualness of them and the fact they are a different silhouette for me, and not another pair of skinny jeans!

I seem to be a on a jeans sewing kick at the moment (just finished a pair of ginger jeans which I love!) hope your sewing is going well.

Until soon.

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Butterick 6331 trousers in bengaline

 

Butterick 6331: DIY Short Length Trench Coat

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Butterick 6331 Short Trench

Hey Friends,

I firmly believe we all learn so much from our mistakes. Everything we make, whether good or bad, is a valuable learning experience. That’s why I like to document my “failures” as well as my hits. I am not saying this trench is a complete failure…I think it will get worn, and I think I will probably try and make the pattern up again as intended, but it’s definitely not a perfect make by any means. Read on to find out why…

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Butterick 6331 Short Trench

Butterick 6331 is one of the Lisette patterns, designed by Liesl Gibson, and honestly, I think it’s a great little pattern (spoiler: I have already made the pants from the pattern – see here on Instagram, and love them). The problems I encountered arose from my decision to fully line this jacket. First some detail shots.

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Butterick 6331 Short Trench

I added the sleeve tabs and shoulder epaulettes myself: these features are not included as part of the pattern. I substituted traditional buttons for snaps and omitted any fastenings from the front of the jacket as I wanted a clean look. I have worn the jacket a couple of times actually and it seems ok without fastenings.

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Butterick 6331 Short Trench – shoulder epaulette detail

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Butterick 6331 Short Trench – sleeve tab detail

So, as designed, the trench is intended to be unlined. Initially I was all set to do a bias bound finish on all the seams, but I started off sewing the pockets (which use 0.25 inch seam allowance I think?) and therein the problems arose. I mean, maybe I could have french seamed them or something but gosh, they looked awful. I think I am correct in saying that the Sewaholic Robson trench (which is also unlined) uses 5/8ths inch, so maybe that facilitates getting a neater finish using bias binding, and possibly the same applies to the new Deer and Doe Luzerne trench (?) but nope, wasn’t happening for this sewist. So I then made the decision to fully line the trench using a checked viscose lining I had in my stash (BTW, the outer fabric was also from my stash – a supposedly ex-Burberry shower resistant fabric I purchased some years back from eBay).

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Butterick 6331 Short Trench – inside lining

Two problems I encountered with lining this jacket:

  1. Initially I didn’t use the included facing pieces and cut a full lining using the outer jacket pattern pieces. This resulted in a show of the lining at the lapels when turned back. See here for a picture of that. So, then, I had to do a patch job with the remaining fabric I had and as a result, my lapels have a join in them, which you can just see when the jacket is being worn.
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Butterick 6331 Short Trench

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Butterick 6331 Short Trench – front facings

2. I just couldn’t get my head around what alterations to make to the sleeve lining to get them to join smoothly to the facing. Even now, I just don’t know what alterations to make to the pattern pieces. I mean, I did it, but it’s not perfect and, as a result, I think the sleeves are not hanging perfectly straight.

In short, a catalogue of disasters: none of which, I hasten to add, are the patterns fault. As I said above, I would like to make this jacket up again, maybe in a sturdy twill or even a linen but not add the lining!

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Butterick 6331 Short Trench

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Butterick 6331 Short Trench

Pattern Review

Pattern Description:
Loose-fitting, unlined, double-breasted jacket has notched collar, side-front seams and pockets, belt loops, back button shield, elasticized back casing, tie ends, stitched hems, two-piece, rolled raglan sleeves (wrong side shows). A: Below elbow sleeves and button tabs. Semi-fitted, tapered pants (slightly below waist) have waistband, belt loops, side-front pockets, yoke back, and mock-fly zipper. C: Cropped.

I made view B.
Pattern Sizing:
6 – 22
Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?
Yep.
Were the instructions easy to follow?
Yes, although I added a full lining.
What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?
The pattern itself is a good pattern (including the pants which I have also made up – review to come), and the issues I encountered were to do with my decision to add a full lining, also not helped by the fact that I had to patch my front facings which has resulted in a join which is slightly visible when the jacket is being worn. I like the overall shape and length. I would like to make this jacket up again as intended. I wanted to do a bias bound finish on the interior seams but the pockets are sewn with a 0.25 inch seam allowance (I think this is correct) and my binding just looked awful. I would love to know how the designer intended to finish the interior seams.
Fabric Used:
The outer fabric was purchased a few years ago from eBay and is supposedly an ex-Burberry shower resistant poplin (?)

The lining is a checked viscose.
Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:

  • I cut a size 18 through the shoulders, bust and arms and ended up grading out 2 sizes at the hips as well as adding a further 1 inch at the side seams.
  • Removed 3 inches from the sleeve length.
  • Lowered bust fullness by 1 inch.
  • Added 1 inch at lengthen/ shorten lines to get waist in to the right position and a further 1.5 inches below the pockets (to ensure the pockets didn’t move down too low).
  • Raised the position of the back elastic by 1.5 inches and lowered the carrier positions at the front by 6/8ths inch.
  • Added sleeve tabs and shoulder epaulettes with snaps.
  • Omitted front fastenings.
  • Added additional topstitching to the belt and belt carriers.
  • Added a full lining – I still cannot fathom what alterations I should have done to the sleeve lining to get a smooth join to the front facing. I just did it and as a result I suspect the sleeves are not hanging entirely straight.
  • Sewed through the lining on the back piece to create a “casing” through which I fed the elastic and sewed the ends closed through all layers of the jacket plus elastic.
  • Note: my front facings have a join which is just visible on one side when the lapels are turned back because I ended up having to patch my facings when I cut my lining pieces.

Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?

Yes, I do think this is a good shape for me and I would like to sew it again – but unlined! I have already made the pants from this pattern – review to follow – and they are good. Yes, I recommend.
Conclusion:
A bit of a catalogue of errors on my part – not the fault of the pattern – but I have worn it a couple of times and I think I would like to make this one up again.

Until soon, have a great week (next week is my first week back at work, eek!). I have lots of unblogged things to come.

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Butterick 6331 Short Trench

Outfit details: red Jalie Elenore pull on jeans and striped McCalls 6886 (modified) breton top.

 

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