Tag Archive | full butt adjustment

Simplicity 8292: DIY Flutter Sleeve Fuschia Pink Crepe Sheath Dress

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Simplicity 8292 flutter sleeve sheath dress in fuschia pink triple crepe

Hi everyone,

I am going on a flying visit to the States at the end of September for my cousin’s wedding and I made this dress thinking I would wear this to the daytime/ church ceremony. Now I am having second thoughts as to whether it will be too warm (New Jersey at the end of September – Carolyn or anyone else, any thoughts?). Anyway, the pattern is Simplicity 8292. The main thing to note about my version is that I have moved the under bust/ empire line seam down to create a waist seam, which I personally find more comfortable and flattering. More details on that in the review below.

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Simplicity 8292 flutter sleeve sheath dress in fuschia pink triple crepe

The fabric is this triple crepe in fuschia pink, purchased from Minerva crafts. I have worked with this triple crepe before and it is quite weighty. I was worried it might fray like mad, but it wasn’t too bad. I put it through a hot 60 degree prewash and it cut and sewed very well. I did use a medium heat for pressing with steam and my clapper to get a crisper finish on my pressing.

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Simplicity 8292 flutter sleeve sheath dress in fuschia pink triple crepe

Can I just say I am thrilled with the fit through the back of the skirt? I would never be able to get a sheath dress like this to fit me RTW and I love the princess seams on this pattern for the fit opportunities. I did do a full bum adjustment and it worked very well.

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Simplicity 8292 flutter sleeve sheath dress in fuschia pink triple crepe

The main attraction of this pattern of course is the statement flutter sleeves. They do make this dress very of the moment, but other sleeve options are included in the pattern (including a cold sleeve option as well as a plain short sleeve option), so I would consider making this dress again for work in a neutral colour with the short sleeve option – now I have got the dress to fit me so well. One thing to watch out for: I wish I had chosen another seam finishing technique to finish the sleeve seam instead of overlocking. I mean, you can’t see it in these pictures when I have the dress on, but personally I think it looks a little ugly, and if I was making this dress again with the flutter sleeves I would reconsider this aspect.

I chose to fully line my dress. I used this tutorial to fully machine the lining around the armholes which I think worked well. Inside shots:

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Simplicity 8292 flutter sleeve sheath dress in fuschia pink triple crepe – machine finish lining attachment around armhole

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Simplicity 8292 flutter sleeve sheath dress in fuschia pink triple crepe – full lining

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Simplicity 8292 flutter sleeve sheath dress in fuschia pink triple crepe – machine finish lining attachment around armhole

Pattern Review

Pattern Description:

This Misses’/Miss Petite dress features three different sleeve options, princess seams, invisible back zipper, lined bodice and your choice of either long flare or pencil cut each in two lengths.

I made view C with some alterations.

Pattern Sizing:

6 – 22

Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?

Yes, although the most noticeable difference between the pattern and my version is that I moved the under bust/ empire line seam down to hit at my waist.

Were the instructions easy to follow?

Yes. I kind of did my own thing when it came to the lining.

What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?

I love the finished dress: the fit and the statement flutter sleeves. Love the princess seams which give lots of fitting opportunities. I wish I had chosen another seam finishing technique to finish the sleeve seam instead of overlocking. I mean, you can’t see it in these pictures when I have the dress on, but personally I think it looks a little ugly, and if I was making this dress again with the flutter sleeves I would reconsider this aspect.

Fabric Used:

Triple crepe outer and polyester lining.

Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:

  • I cut my usual size 18 through the shoulders and bust and graded out over the waist and hips.
  • I cut the skirt pattern off at the marked waistline and taped the pieces I cut off  onto the bottom of the corresponding bodice pieces, overlapping the seam allowances, and re-adding new seam allowances at the bottom edges and at the new top edges of the skirt pattern pieces. I did this in order to move the under bust/ empire line down to waist level, which I personally find more comfortable and flattering.
  • 1 inch FBA
  • Added about an inch to the side seams but probably removed most of that when fitting the dress. Used a slightly larger seam allowance than suggested to insert the zipper in the centre back seam
  • 1 inch sway back adjustment on bodice
  • Added a full lining
  • Used the princess seams to fit: let them out approx. 0.25 inch in the tummy and bottom area
  • Did 1 inch full bum adjustment largely to add length to the back of the skirt to account for my full bottom
  • After making the FBA etc some of the seams didn’t match so had to make some adjustments to make the bodice and skirt seams match
  • Interfaced the skirt hems, vent area and zipper opening
  • Hand stitched hems

Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?

Initially I thought my answer to this would be no. But the fact that a plain short sleeve is included means I could see me making this dress again in a neutral colour for work. Yes, I recommend.

Conclusion:

I love the fit, the colour and the statement sleeves. Remains to be seen whether I actually wear this to the wedding at the end of September in New Jersey or if it will be too hot.

Over on Instagram, Diane and Helen are currently running #sleevefest2017 – the deadline for which is on 31st August, so I think I am just in time.

Enjoy the long weekend if you have one, otherwise enjoy your week.

Until soon.

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Simplicity 8292 flutter sleeve sheath dress in fuschia pink triple crepe

 

 

 

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Butterick 6331: DIY Pale Pink Trousers

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Butterick 6331 trousers in bengaline (worn with blue denim Grainline Archer shirt)

Friends,

Pink is having a moment in the fashion world apparently, and so I found some cheap pink bengaline online to make a wearable muslin of Butterick 6331 (remember, I made the trench from this pattern a few weeks back?)

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Butterick 6331 trousers in bengaline

As ever, full review below, but overall I like these. This trouser pattern is a useful one to have in the stash because it is intended for woven, non-stretch fabrics and is an easy sew. It has a back yoke (so essentially it is a basic jeans pattern), front pockets and tapered legs. In fact, I have already made these again in a white denim as a boyfriend style jeans (you can see a sneak peak here on Instagram). Here’s the dreaded back view:

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Butterick 6331 trousers in bengaline

There are some diagonal lines under the bottom: I am no pants fitting expert but I have removed a tiny bit of width from the inner back leg and scooped a tiny bit out of the back crotch for next time (any experts please chime in!)

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Butterick 6331 trousers in bengaline

Pattern Review

Pattern Description:

Loose-fitting, unlined, double-breasted jacket has notched collar, side-front seams and pockets, belt loops, back button shield, elasticized back casing, tie ends, stitched hems, two-piece, rolled raglan sleeves (wrong side shows). A: Below elbow sleeves and button tabs. Semi-fitted, tapered pants (slightly below waist) have waistband, belt loops, side-front pockets, yoke back, and mock-fly zipper. C: Cropped.

I made view D.

Pattern Sizing:

6 – 22

Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?

Yes.

Were the instructions easy to follow?

Yes.

What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?

I like that the pattern is intended for non-stretch woven fabrics and is essentially a jeans pattern, with a back yoke, pockets and tapered legs. Nothing to dislike, although I will add a fly shield next time round.

Fabric Used:

A pink bengaline which actually has lengthwise stretch. I stitched the crotch seam using my stretch stitch to prevent any stitching from popping.

Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:

  • 2.75 inch full butt adjustment.
  • Removed 1 inch in length from above the knee.
  • Changed the straight waistband to a contoured waistband and interfaced both sides.
  • Interfaced zipper area.
  • Slimmed leg seams down slightly once sewn by removing 0.5 inch from the side front and back seams below the knee.
  • Removed 3 inches from the length.

Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?

Really, this was a wearable muslin and I have already sewn this up again as boyfriend style white denim jeans. Review coming soon! Yes I recommend.

Conclusion:

Quick to make and very easy to wear. I like the smart, casualness of them and the fact they are a different silhouette for me, and not another pair of skinny jeans!

I seem to be a on a jeans sewing kick at the moment (just finished a pair of ginger jeans which I love!) hope your sewing is going well.

Until soon.

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Butterick 6331 trousers in bengaline

 

Butterick 6288 and Vogue 1517: DIY Silk Shirt and Pull on Ponte Pants by Anne Klein

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Butterick 6288 silk shirt and Vogue 1517 pull on ponte pants by Anne Klein

Friends,

has it really been a month since I last posted? Wow. I have been sewing…quite a bit…but a few things I can’t share with you just yet, and then the weather…oof! I was holding off for some outdoor shots of this outfit, but it just wasn’t meant to be. Also, I know this post includes photos of pants/ trousers that you can’t see too much detail of, but you’re just going to have to go with it.

Let’s start with the shirt, and first of all the printed fabric, which kindly sent to me by a new-to-me fabric supplier: FC Fabric Studio, based in London. This is a gorgeous abstract printed silk crepe de chine, priced very reasonably, at £8/m. It pre-washed absolutely fine and feels wonderfully light and airy to wear (the contrast plain blue silk crepe de chine was in my stash, and by contrast just refuses to look anything but slightly rumpled). Go check their website out because they have a good variety of high fashion fabrics at reasonable prices, with new stock being added every day. They sent me a second piece of silk (this one if you want to see), so expect that to pop up sometime soon.

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Butterick 6288 silk shirt

The pattern I used to make this shirt was Butterick 6288, view B with the sleeves from view C. I did make some alterations to the pattern (see below), but the main thing I wanted to mention was the fit through the bust. I cut a size 18 through the shoulders, arms and bust, and the finished pattern measurements give the finished bust size as 52 inches. This might sound like a lot (it is!) but be warned this measurement may well include the fullness through the back – whereas I need fullness through the front! That’s why I did a 1 inch FBA. However, I don’t know if it is to do with the fact my bust dart is about 1 inch too low, or if I need a bigger FBA, but I feel like I could do with a little more width through the upper chest. I mean, I am definitely going to wear this shirt as is, but for next time round I have moved the dart up by 1 inch and added a further 0.5 inch to the FBA, this time slicing up almost to the shoulder seam to give more room there (Fit for Real People call this a Y-Bust alteration).

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Butterick 6288 silk shirt and Vogue 1517 pull on ponte pants by Anne Klein

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Butterick 6288 silk shirt and Vogue 1517 pull on ponte pants by Anne Klein

In lieu of interfacing I used silk organza. I omitted all directions to hand stitch, using the burrito method to attach the yokes and adding top stitching only where necessary. I overlocked the side seams but french seamed the sleeve seams and sleeves into the armholes. Some details:

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Butterick 6288 silk shirt contrast placket

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Butterick 6288 silk shirt hidden button placket

Pattern Review Butterick 6288

Pattern Description:
Very loose-fitting shirt has collar, collar and front bands, self-lined yoke back, back longer than front, wrong side shows, narrow hem, and fly front button closing. A: Bias armholes facings, pockets, and topstitching. B: Stitched hem on sleeves. A, B: Side slits, back pleat and gathers. C: Back pleats, shaped hemline, continuous lap and button cuffs on sleeves.

I made view B with the sleeves from view C.
Pattern Sizing:
8 – 24
Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?
Yes.
Were the instructions easy to follow?
They are ok but I prefer to use my own methods of construction which don’t involve hand sewing.
What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?
I do like the finished shirt with the split hem and the relaxed fit. The button placket took a little bit of working out. I didn’t like all the instructions to use hand sewing.
Fabric Used:
Patterned silk crepe de chine for the main body of the shirt (FC Fabric Studio) with a contrast plain silk crepe de chine for the cuffs, sleeve plackets, button bands, collar stand and collar.
Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:

  • I cut a size 18 through the shoulders, arms and bust and graded out 2 sizes at the hip.
  • Although the finished pattern measurements for a size 18 are given as 52 inches, this may include the fullness at the back. So I elected to do a 1 inch FBA. My bust darts are about 1 inch too low. Whether it is due to the bust dart position, or whether it is because I need a bigger FBA, I feel like I need more room across the upper chest. So I have altered the pattern for next time, adding a further 0.5 inch to the FBA, and slicing up almost to the shoulder seam (Fit for People call this a Y-Bust alteration). I will still wear this shirt!
  • Shortened sleeve by 2 inches.
  • 1 inch full arm adjustment.
  • 1 inch sway back adjustment – adding removed length back to hem.
  • Increased armhole depth by 0.5 inch.
  • Used silk organza in place of interfacing.
  • Ignored instructions to handstitch and top stitched where necessary.
  • Used burrito method to attach yokes.
  • I overlocked the side seams, but french seamed the sleeve seams and the sleeves into the armholes.

Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?
Yes, I might sew again. Yes, I recommend.
Conclusion:
This is a fun take on the traditional button down shirt and I like the way the button placket doesn’t go all the way up to the top of the neck but has that neck lengthening V-shape.

Now the pants. They are made using Vogue 1517, which is an Anne Klein pattern, and some ponte knit. Someday I am going to make the jacket from this pattern. Anyway, I have never owned or sewn ponte knit pants, but I thought I would try them out. Two things you should know about these pants:

  1. They are pull on pants and the instructions have you sew in an exposed (on the inside) elastic waistband. I didn’t like that idea (largely because I had white elastic!) so I cut two waistbands and encased the elastic inside.
  2. They feature a centre front and back seam detail which I actually thought were edge stitched, but it turns out they are just topstitched in place. TBH it’s probably a good thing they are not edgestitched because, at least for the back, the seams are no where near the centre of the back of my leg. I have altered the pattern for future use to move the seam over by 1.5 inches.
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Vogue 1517 Pull on ponte pants by Anne Klein

Initially, I put the finished pants on and thought “meh”. They made me feel like I was wearing track suit bottoms. But I have worn them properly for the first time today, all day, and I have to say I am sold on  how comfortable they are but how smart they look. They didn’t bag out or stretch; I do recommend. Perfect for a day in the car, office or travelling. BTW, you can see a bit of the back fit in this instagram photo.

Pattern Review Vogue 1517

Pattern Description:
Close-fitting pants have elasticized waistband, seam detail, and stitched hem
Pattern Sizing:
6 – 22
Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?
Yes.
Were the instructions easy to follow?
Yes.
What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?
I love the finished pants. So comfortable but still smart. They have kept their shape after a day of wearing, mainly sitting. I didn’t like the instruction to have the elastic exposed inside, but I just cut two waistbands and enclosed the elastic inside.
Fabric Used:
Ponte knit.
Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:

  • Full butt adjustment to raise the height of the back waistline up by about 2 inches.
  • Removed 5/8ths inch from inner back seam.
  • Tapered lower legs slightly to suit.
  • Shaped the straight waistband by removing two 0.5 inch wedges from the upper edge.
  • For next time I have already scooped out the front crotch about 0.25 inch and added 0.25 inch to the legnth of the front crotch and also removed 3/4 inch from the length.
  • Note that the centre back seams are not central, at least on my legs, so I have moved the seam over by 1.5 inches for next time.

Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?
Yes, I believe I might. Yes, I definitely recommend.
Conclusion:
I didn’t think I would like these pants as much as I do but I am a convert. Perfect smart casual piece.

*Check out this post for links on how I did the full butt adjustment on a previous pair of pants.

**Also, this instagram photo shows how I did the same adjustment on these particular pants across the princess seams.

Back soon – until then, happy sewing!

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Butterick 6288 silk shirt and Vogue 1517 pull on ponte pants by Anne Klein

Simplicity 1167: DIY Boyfriend Style Chino Trousers Pants

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Simplicity 1167: DIY boyfriend style chino trousers/ pants worn with McCalls 6886 breton top

Hi Friends,

Today I am sharing my latest make with you, a new style for me, what I am calling boyfriend style chino trousers/ pants, made using Simplicity 1167 (another Mimi G Style pattern).

I have been wanting to get away from wearing skinny jeans/ jeggings as much as I do. It has been a verrrrry long time since I wore proper trousers (like maybe more than 4 years!) Since I gave up working I don’t feel the need to wear smart trousers on a daily basis. But this here is my first foray into sewing “proper trousers”.

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Simplicity 1167: DIY boyfriend style chino trousers/ pants worn with McCalls 6886 breton top

Let’s talk about how my trousers compare to the picture on the pattern envelope shall we?

The ones on the pattern envelope look like they are made from ponte knit (the fabric recommendations for this pattern are stretch wovens only), and they are very fitted. The side seam looks skewed forward to me, almost as if the trousers were taken in along the side seams to get a closer fit? I didn’t want such a close fit, but what I will say is that I ended up having to remove a total of 2 inches from the outer seams of my version and they are still no where near as fitted as the pattern envelope ones are. Just saying. BTW, mine are made up in a stretch cotton sateen.

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Simplicity 1167: DIY boyfriend style chino trousers/ pants worn with McCalls 6886 breton top

The main adjustments that I made to this pattern were to do a full butt adjustment and to curve my waistband more to account for my swayback and eliminate a huge amount of waistband gaping. To do the full butt adjustment I used a combination of the tutorials from By Hand London and Colette Patterns. This raised the back height up by 1.25 inches. I would say that these are a mid rise trouser, and this is something I need to get used to again (lately I have been all about the high rise). This is a picture of my adjusted pattern – sorry the adjustment is not that obvious to see.

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Simplicity 1167: DIY boyfriend style chino trousers/ pants – full butt adjustment to back pattern piece

Heather describes how to curve a waistband here. From the picture below you might just be able to see I ended up making 4 “hinges” in the upper waistband, overlapping each hinge by 0.5 inches to effectively remove a total of 2 inches from my upper waistband. The blue waistband underneath is the original left waistband I cut which I ended up discarding and re-cutting using the modified pattern piece. (I did the same on the RHS waistband so I removed a total of 4 inches from the upper waistband in all).

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Simplicity 1167: DIY boyfriend style chino trousers/ pants – waistband alteration to eliminate gaping

Here’s a back view – note that I added welt pockets using this amazing tutorial from Nicole at home which also provides downloadable pattern pieces. This is the first time I have done welt pockets and whilst they are perfectly secure and functioning, let’s just say there is certainly room for improvement. Also, can I just say that no matter how many times I post a back view of a garment it never becomes any easier for me to see that view! But, you know, because I want you to see a complete view of the garment I do it.

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Simplicity 1167: DIY boyfriend style chino trousers/ pants

As ever, full review below. I had these trousers on all day yesterday and love the ease and comfort of wearing them, and combined with the smart fabric I think they tick that smart casual look I strive for on a daily basis. I think they will look better with slightly shorter tops than the ones I would typically wear with my skinny jeans though, which means sewing some new tops – if I really think this new trouser shape is a keeper. I do have another length of khaki/ olive stretch sateen. I am tempted now I have got these to fit to make a second pair, perhaps slightly longer. Do you think I should slim them down some, or should I just try another pattern?

Pattern review

Pattern Description:
Mimi G Style sportswear pattern for Misses includes great jacket, slim pants or shorts with fly-front and carriers in stretch wovens, and knit tank top.

I made view B.
Pattern Sizing:
6 – 24
Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?
Mmmm…I would say mine look more relaxed fit.
Were the instructions easy to follow?
Yep
What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?
Likes:

I do like the finished trousers very much. They are very easy to sew. Separate pieces are included in the pattern envelope for view C (the shorts), and you are not just expected to shorten view B (the trousers), which I thought was a nice touch. The pattern includes facing pieces for the pocket to cut down on bulk which I thought was a great idea. The zipper instructions were good.

Dislikes:

I think the pattern picture is slightly misleading. In the pattern picture the side leg seam looks skewed forward almost as if the seam has been taken in IMO to achieve the closer fit. I ended up removing a total of 2 inches from the outer seam of my version and they are still no where near as fitted as the pattern envelope. I am undecided whether to slim my legs down further or not.
Fabric Used:
Stretch cotton sateen
Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:

I did a full butt adjustment which added 1.25 inches to the back height.

I added 5/8ths inch to the height of the left and right waistband.

I curved my waistband to account for my swayback, removing a total of 2 inches from the left and 2 inches from the right hand side waistband.

I removed a total of 2 inches from the outer seam of my trousers, and have already adjusted the pattern to remove 0.5 inches from the inner and outer seam of both front and back legs next time.

Added back welt pockets.

I ended up cutting too much off my trouser legs! So I added cuffs to the bottom because I wanted the cuffed look.
Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?

Now that I have got the fit I think I should sew them again. But things I need to think about:

 

  • Should I slim the legs down further?
  • Can I get used to the mid rise?
  • Do I need to sew some tops to go with these trousers which are not as long as those I tend to wear with my skinny jeans?

I recommend in that these are an easy sew with great results but, as with any trouser/ pants pattern, be prepared to spend time perfecting the fit!
Conclusion:

 

I love this version because they are so comfortable and yet still look smart.

Now that I have got this pattern to fit I would like to make a second pair (I have a length of khaki/olive stretch cotton sateen in my stash, and I am thinking a slightly longer pair, perhaps minus the cuffs), but I think I will wear these a couple more times before I decide.

What do you think? See you soon!

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Simplicity 1167: DIY boyfriend style chino trousers/ pants worn with McCalls 6886 breton top

 

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