Tag Archive | grainline archer shirt

Butterick 6331 and Simplicity 2446: DIY Floral Twill Trouser Suit made using Spoonflower Fabric

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Butterick 6331 trouser and Simplicity 2446 blazer – made using Jungle Passion floral navy lightweight cotton twill from Spoonflower. Worn with white cotton Grainline Archer.

Hi Friends,

No, I am not entering a Chris Evans look-alike contest (British reference there). Today’s post features fabric kindly sent to me by Spoonflower. I am sure many of you have already heard of the eco-friendly custom printing firm. About 1.5 years ago they opened a second factory in Berlin, and to celebrate they asked a few British bloggers to be part of a Blog Tour, and make items using Spoonflower fabric. You can see the list of bloggers here on the Spoonflower Blog. The fabric I have used in this post was sent to me for no charge by Spoonflower, but all opinions are my own.

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Butterick 6331 trouser and Simplicity 2446 blazer – made using Jungle Passion floral navy lightweight cotton twill from Spoonflower.

I have never ordered fabric from Spoonflower before. The choice of already uploaded designs on the Spoonflower website is vast (of course the option is also there to upload your own design), and somewhat overwhelming. I searched using key words of prints I have a passion for (like dark florals), and elected to go for Jungle Passion Floral Navy by Joan McLemore, printed on to the lightweight cotton twill (58″ width).

Because of my own indecision, Spoonflower ended up sending me this fabric in two separate lengths but I was not able to detect any differences in the colours between the two lengths. I think the colours are a pretty good match to what was shown on screen when I was making my selection. I also liked the fact that, at least for the design I selected, previews were provided of the fabric made up into a cushion and a dress, so I could guage the scale of the print.

I did run the fabrics through a hot (60 degree) pre-wash before cutting out and did not notice any running, bleeding or fading. This particular fabric was easy to cut, sew and press. It’s a good weight without being too heavy and bulky. Full disclosure: will I ever wear these two pieces together? Probably not, but as separates in my wardrobe I love them and how individual and quirky they are. I already have lots of things which these items will go with.

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Butterick 6331 trouser and Simplicity 2446 blazer – made using Jungle Passion floral navy lightweight cotton twill from Spoonflower.

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Butterick 6331 trouser and Simplicity 2446 blazer – made using Jungle Passion floral navy lightweight cotton twill from Spoonflower.

Some details:

The trousers were made using Butterick 6331. This is actually my third iteration of these pants (I haven’t shown you version two yet), but you can see my first version here. For this version I took on board what some of you said in the comments and scooped out the back crotch by 0.25 inches and added 0.5 inches to the upper back thigh. I know it’s hard to see in this busy print but overall I think it’s better. Other changes for this version:

  • I fully interfaced the waistband.
  • I had to let the side seams out a touch from the waist down to the bottom of the pockets.
  • I hemmed the bottoms by hand.
  • These are trousers but with some jeans details like additional topstitching, jeans button and bar tacks.
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Butterick 6331 Floral Twill Trousers – made using Jungle Passion floral navy lightweight cotton twill from Spoonflower. Topstitching detail.

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Butterick 6331 Floral Twill Trousers – made using Jungle Passion floral navy lightweight cotton twill from Spoonflower. Inside view of waistband and (modified) fly facing.

The blazer was made using Simplicity 2446, which I first made in wool ponte. I do love my first version, and since going back to work, have worn it a few times. But the shoulders are too big (although I did go back and alter them to be smaller). So for this version I made sure to do a small shoulder adjustment.

  • I did a 5/8ths inch small shoulder adjustment.
  • I shaved 0.25 inches off all the shoulder princess seams above the bust.
  • I added a centre back seam for shaping.
  • I shortened the pocket bag length by 1.5 inches.
  • I added small ready made shoulder pads but omitted sleeve heads and chest reinforcement.
  • You can see a picture of the internal interfacing here on Instagram if you want.

My previous two blazers have taken me approx. 3 weeks each to make: I slaved over this blazer to get it done in a week! Gosh it was tough but overall I am pretty happy with the finished result.

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Simplicity 2446 Floral Twill Blazer – made using Jungle Passion floral navy lightweight cotton twill from Spoonflower.

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Simplicity 2446 Floral Twill Blazer – made using Jungle Passion floral navy lightweight cotton twill from Spoonflower. Front lapel detail.

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Simplicity 2446 Floral Twill Blazer – made using Jungle Passion floral navy lightweight cotton twill from Spoonflower. Welt pocket with flap detail.

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Simplicity 2446 Floral Twill Blazer – made using Jungle Passion floral navy lightweight cotton twill from Spoonflower. Welt pocket detail.

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Simplicity 2446 Floral Twill Blazer – made using Jungle Passion floral navy lightweight cotton twill from Spoonflower. Sleeve vent detail.

Like I say, being honest, I don’t think I would be brave enough to go full on head to toe pattern,  but as individual pieces I think these are going to get worn lots. I am also very proud of how far I have come on with my sewing techniques tackling things like the welt pockets and sleeve vents and even the trouser fitting and sewing.

Happy sewing everyone!

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Butterick 6331 trouser and Simplicity 2446 blazer – made using Jungle Passion floral navy lightweight cotton twill from Spoonflower.

 

 

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Grainline Studio Archer Button Up Shirt: DIY Plaid Shirt with Pearl Snaps – now with FBA!

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Grainline Studio Archer Shirt

Hi Friends,

I think this is my 7th time of making this pattern. Quite a record for me. This is my third plaid version. I have also made versions in denim, linen and cotton shirting and voile. BUT this version is an new and (mainly) improved version.

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Grainline Studio Archer Shirt

Why start messing around with a pattern on the 7th time of making you ask? Well, it started when I was featured in one of the “Same Pattern, Different Bodies” posts, about the Archer Shirt, on the Curvy Sewing Collective. (If you read through the comments section on that post, you will see that I did get rather irritated. Oh dear!) Anyway, moving on, one of the commentators said that she felt that all the shirts that were featured basically needed an FBA. I have never felt like I needed to do an FBA on the Archer shirt, but here’s the thing, when you sew a shirt in plaid then the checks can be very telling when it comes to the fit. Here are the first two versions of this shirt, sewn in plaid, without the FBA:

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Jalie Eleonore Pull on Jeans: DIY Mustard Jeggings worn with Grainline Archer Shirt

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Plaid Flannel Archer Button Up Shirt

I don’t think the checks look too bad over the bust, but I decided that maybe I could do with just a small 0.5 inch FBA. So that is what I did, using the method described by Paprika Patterns (how to do a FBA on a dartless shirt). I eliminated the dart, and redrafted the side seam as I decided I did not want a bust dart interfering with any futher plaid versions of this pattern I might make.

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Grainline Studio Archer Shirt

Yes, I think the checks now lie just that tiny bit more horizontal. So FBA successfully completed.

Other changes I also made:

  • I finally got round to adding 0.25 inches to the armholes, sleeves and side seams to facilitate flat fell finishing all those seams.
  • I don’t mind using the continous lapped placket method for some shirts – in fact for light weight fabrics I probably prefer that method – but for more weightier fabrics I think a tower placket is more appropriate. So that’s what I did on this shirt, using this tutorial from Off The Cuff – excellent tutorial and surprisingly easy to do.

 

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Grainline Studio Archer Shirt – tower placket detail

Now let’s talk about what is not so good: the comically large cuffs. Readers, I am completely baffled as to why the cuffs are as large as they are. I didn’t add anything to the cuff seam allowances, I did the pleats as usual, and the only thing I can think of is that either the plackets have somehow made them bigger, or that this fabric has just somehow grown?! I am stumped. Another version will probably have to be made to investigate. Sigh.

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Grainline Studio Archer Shirt

This is my first time using pearl snaps, and I basically followed exactly what VeryKerryBerry says to do in this tutorial, including buying the pliers and a set of Prym jersey snaps so that I would have the plastic attachments. Conclusion: using the Prym snaps gave the best results (rather than the generic snaps), and using the pliers with the plastic attachments gave pretty much fool proof results.

I love how cosy this version of this shirt is, and let’s face it, spring, at least in this corner of the world, is still a way off. If I can resolve the cuff issue this will continue to be a firm favourite.

Happy sewing!

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Grainline Studio Archer Shirt

McCalls 7058 and Grainline Archer: DIY White Linton Tweed Boucle Cropped Jacket and Striped Linen Shirt

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McCalls 7058 White Cropped Linton Tweed Boucle Jacket, worn with Striped Linen Grainline Archer shirt.

Hey Friends,

I have mentioned before that I live very close (about 25 minutes drive since moving?) from Linton Tweeds in Carlisle. I don’t actually go there very often (although they do a mean lemon meringue pie :-)), and I have yet to purchase any fabric from a roll. What they do have is pre-cut 1 metre skirt lengths for substantially less than the roll price, often with an offer if you buy 2 at the same time. So in my stash I have a few pieces of Linton Tweed fabric in skirt lengths.

What I have realised is that buying these skirt lengths is, for me, not that useful. I don’t make skirts from them, and for me, I probably need more than a one metre length to cut a decent jacket from. But I had two skirt lengths of this white boucle and determined to make something from it I set off. Here’s a close up of the fabric because it is hard to see the beautiful texture in the photographs (sorry the outdoor shots were taken early one cloudy morning):

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McCalls 7058 White Cropped Linton Tweed Boucle Jacket – close up of fabric texture

I needed a pattern that didn’t require too many pieces. Vogue 7975 was out because, with the two piece sleeves I felt I wouldn’t have enough fabric. I also wanted a fairly quick make which didn’t require a lot of fitting. I eventually decided to make a modified version of McCalls 7058 which I made a winter version of earlier this year. Here’s what it looked like last time to refresh your memories:

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McCalls 7058 Basket Weave Interlined Wool Winter Coat

Here’s my modified version:

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McCalls 7058 White Cropped Linton Tweed Boucle Jacket, worn with Striped Linen Grainline Archer shirt.

Here’s how I approached the sewing and the modifications.

First off, and I don’t recommend this as a general rule for Linton Tweed, I prewashed my fabric. Linton Tweed fabrics are woven using a mixed composition of fibres and if you prewash you do run the risk of ruining your beautiful fabric. But as this fabric didn’t cost me much (less than £15 for both cuts), and I really couldn’t face having a white jacket that wasn’t washable I just went with it, washing it on a gentle cycle with a wool appropriate detergent. It worked out fine. Fabric was unaffected.

Next I block fused my two 1 metre lengths using a light weight weft insertion fusible interfacing. I lined the two selvedge edges up and fused using my press cloth and an iron. Made the fabric much easier to handle as well.

In terms of pattern modifications I:

  • removed 4 inches from the View A cutting line for the body
  • removed 5 inches from the sleeve length
  • removed 1 inch from the centre fronts so there was no overlap

For a full pattern review see my first version.

I wanted a very soft look to the jacket so I kept the tailoring to a minimum. I added a backstay and stabilised the front edges and neckline using twill tape hand stitched in place 0.5 inches from the neck edges and 5/8ths inch from front edges.

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McCalls 7058 Linton Tweed Boucle Jacket – back stay

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McCalls 7058 Linton Tweed Boucle Jacket – stabilising neck and front edges using twill tape.

I added very light shoulder pads and hand stitched all the hems. Here are some pictures on the (too small) dressform. You can see that even though this is a one piece sleeve the elbow dart gives some nice shaping. The jacket is fully lined with a lightweight viscose twill lining.

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McCalls 7058 White Cropped Linton Tweed Boucle Jacket – side view

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McCalls 7058 White Cropped Linton Tweed Boucle Jacket – inside lining – front view

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McCalls 7058 White Cropped Linton Tweed Boucle Jacket – inside lining back view

On this next side lining view you will see a glimpse of my new custom woven clothing labels which were very kindly made for me by Dutch Label Shop – blog post to follow on those.

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McCalls 7058 White Cropped Linton Tweed Boucle Jacket – side view – inside lining

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McCalls 7058 White Cropped Linton Tweed Boucle Jacket, worn with Striped Linen Grainline Archer shirt.

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McCalls 7058 White Cropped Linton Tweed Boucle Jacket, worn with Striped Linen Grainline Archer shirt.

So this is a very plain and simple jacket but I think it will get lots of wear on the cooler days of our great British summer, especially over dresses. I haven’t added any fastenings or trim to this jacket…I did toy with the idea of adding various trims but I figure I can always go back and add something later if I want. I quite like the simplicity of it. It feels so soft and light on, almost like a cardigan.

A brief mention of the shirt. This is version number 5 of Grainline’s Archer shirt. Made in a striped linen that I bought in India. Hard to photograph but lovely to sew, press and wear (although it being linen you have to deal with the creasing!) My only complaint about the Archer pattern is that I don’t like the 0.5 inch seam allowances because it makes flat fell seaming difficult. But it’s worth doing IMO.

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Striped linen Grainline Archer

Have a great weekend and enjoy Father’s Day.

Until soon!

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Striped linen Grainline Archer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Simplicity 8019 and Jalie 3461 Eleonore Jeans: DIY Real Suede Leather Button Front Skirt and Red Jeggings

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Simplicity 8019: Real Suede Leather Button Front Skirt (worn with a new white cotton shirting Archer shirt)

Hello Dear Friends,

It’s been too long! The blasted British weather has meant I have not been able to take any decent blog photographs for ages but today I braved the wind and chill to snap these photos. The lighting was not ideal , and of course, as I type this the sun has come out, but hey ho.

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Simplicity 8019: Real Suede Leather Button Front Skirt

I am totally thrilled with how this skirt has turned out. The pattern is Simplicity 8019, a reissued 70s pattern, and I have made it in the most glorious chestnut brown real suede leather. Really, when I wear this piece I feel very…luxurious. And, oh yes, I made the white cotton shirting Archer shirt as well.

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Simplicity 8019: Real Suede Leather Button Front Skirt

First, let me say that I actually made this pattern up first in some faux suede, as a wearable muslin. Sorry, but you are only going to get a hanger shot of it. Full review below, but what I will say is that this pattern is quite a neat fit at the waist/ high hip/ tummy area. The muslin fits me, but for the real suede version I sized up slightly at the waist/ high hip. If you carry any extra weight in these areas be warned! Now I have made the real suede version of course this faux suede one is just not comparable: it has quite a bit of static and yep, I just don’t love it the way I do the real suede one.

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Simplicity 8019: DIY Faux Suede Button Front Skirt

So, I bought 3 skins of chestnut suede totalling 42 square feet from Le Prevo Leathers in Newcastle, and you can read about my previous epxeriences of sewing with leather in this post here. Pretty much whatever I wrote in that post for sewing and interfacing leather holds true for this suede. I could probably have got away with only buying 2 skins but because of the nap and shape of the pattern pieces I had to go for 3. The snaps on this real suede version were also purchased from Le Prevo.

This real suede version is fully lined in a viscose lining (a remnant from a previous project). I also added hanger loops made from the lining fabric.

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Simplicity 8019: Real Suede Leather Button Front Skirt – full viscose lining

The hem (on the suede) was interfaced and I did a narrow 5/8ths inch hem. I found the deeper hem recommended by the pattern (2 inches) difficult to ease in with the faux suede version and this narrow hem was easier to control. I used specialised leather sewing thread (also bought from Le Prevo) and a stitch length of 4.0 for construction and topstitching.

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Simplicity 8019: Real Suede Leather Button Front Skirt – Hem and lining detail

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Simplicity 8019: Real Suede Leather Button Front Skirt – Snaps and topstitching detail

I FREAKING LOVE MY SKIRT!

Pattern Review

Pattern Description:
These front-gored buttoned skirts from the 1970’s can be made retro with flowy floral prints, or modern in linen or lightweight denim. Skirt can also be made in four lengths. Vintage Simplicity sewing pattern.
Pattern Sizing:
6 – 24
Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?
Yes
Were the instructions easy to follow?
Yes…but there were things I didn’t like. See below.
What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?
I love my final version made in real suede leather. But I made a muslin first (from faux suede) and the fit was slightly off and I didn’t like some aspects of the construction. Nothing to dislike as such. Its a great look.
Fabric Used:
Faux suede for the muslin and real suede leather for the final version lined in viscose lining. I purchased 3 skins of suede totalling 42 square feet. There is a lot of left-over suede but due to the nap and shape of the pattern pieces I could not have got away with just 2 skins.
Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:
I found this pattern to be a neat fit at the waist/ high hips/ tummy area and would recommend making a muslin first if you carry any weight in these areas! For the real suede leather version I sized up slightly at the waist and high hip.

I didn’t like the way the pattern had you put the waist band on first and then finish the button facings. When I made it second time around I did the topstitching on the button facings first and then added my waist band. I also fully lined the skirt on the second version and used snaps rather than buttons.

I found the 2 inch hem hard to ease in on the faux suede version so I removed 2 inches from the length on the real suede leather version and did a narrow 5/8ths inch hem.
Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?
I may make it again…I think it would look great in denim, corduroy or even a flowing viscose for summer. Yes I recommend.
Conclusion:

Love, love, love my final version. It feels so luxurious. I can see me wearing this in the summer with a light top and sandals and with boots and a cropped sweater in the winter. Now I want to sew a wardrobe of things just to wear with it.

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Simplicity 8019: Real Suede Leather Button Front Skirt worn with a new white cotton shirting Archer shirt.

So, I also wanted to share my third pair of Jalie pull on Eleonore jeans. I did’t feel they warranted an entire post of their own. Check out my last pair here. This pair was made exactly the same way except for the fact that I shortened the back elastic by a further 1.5 inches or so. The fit is spot on, but these are made from a cotton/ spandex and personally, I don’t think they are quite as flattering as the black denim ones. They will still get worn, especially when it warms up.

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Jalie 3461 Elenore DIY Pull on Jeans Jeggings.

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Jalie 3461 Elenore DIY Pull on Jeans Jeggings.

What possessed me to wear red and blue I don’t know? Anyway, have a great week ahead and happy sewing!

Until soon…

 

Jalie 3461 Eleonore Pull On Jeans: DIY Mustard Jeggings

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Jalie Eleonore Pull on Jeans: DIY Mustard Jeggings worn with Grainline Archer Shirt

Hi There,

The focus of todays post is my new jeggings, made using Jalie 3461; the Eleonore Pull-On Jeans pattern. But I also want to mention that I am wearing my jeggings with a new Grainline Archer shirt, made from a checked brushed cotton. This is the third time of me making the Archer and you can see the first two versions here and here. The only thing I changed with the current version is that I added 1 inch to the length.

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Jalie Eleonore Pull on Jeans: DIY Mustard Jeggings worn with Grainline Archer Shirt

Back to the jeggings. I guess you either love jeggings or hate them. I personally wear jeggings an awful lot on a day to day basis. I mean, for me they are smarter and more flattering than a legging, but more comfortable than jeans can sometimes be. Plus, I never wear my tops tucked into my waistband so I don’t mind the elasticated waistband (I must be getting old!!) I have no problem buy RTW jeggings, but when I saw the great versions of Eleonore that were popping up (like Dawn’s and Deepika’s) I ordered the pattern and used some stretch cotton twill I had in my stash to whip these up. Let’s consider these a wearable muslin.

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Jalie Eleonore Pull on Jeans: DIY Mustard Jeggings worn with Grainline Archer Shirt

The fit of these jeggings is not perfect. I think on my next pair I will shorten the length of the leg above the knee (and add it back at the ankle?), slim the inner thighs down, raise the crotch slightly and possibly move the pockets down a smidge.Any other suggestions?

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Jalie Eleonore Pull on Jeans: back pocket topstitching and rivets

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Jalie Eleonore Pull on Jeans: inside waistband

One thing to note: I raised the waistband on these by 2 inches and they sit comfortably around my natural waist. I am 5 foot 3 so if you are making these I would say think about if you will be happy with the low rise as they come. Overall they are very comfortable but some tweaking needs to be done. Check out the review below for all the details.

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Jalie Eleonore Pull on Jeans: DIY Mustard Jeggings worn with Grainline Archer Shirt

Pattern Review

Pattern Description:

Stretch pull-on jeans (long or cropped) with wide waistband.

  • Yoke, faux fly in the front, patch pockets in the back
  • Fitted through waist and hips, straight from the knee down
  • Very easy to turn into skinny jeans!

Pattern Sizing:

27 sizes included in the pattern from girls through to plus size women.

Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?

Yes, but I made mine more of a skinny leg jegging

Were the instructions easy to follow?

Yes…but….minor gripe…the instructions as provided are dotted around all over the (large) pattern sheet. I know you can download the instructions but….!

What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?

I love the finished product is so close to my RTW jeggings in appearance. I think with a few more fitting tweaks these will be perfect. The minor quibbles I have with this pattern are no lengthen/ shorten lines, the lack of an instruction sheet (the instructions of course are there but dotted around the pattern sheet), no pattern envelope provided and you are told to hem the jeggings before completing the waistband…hmm…not sure about that last point…risky I say.

Fabric Used:

Cotton twill with ?2%? elastane.

Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:

I cut the size according to my hip size (I didn’t size up) but I did have to ease a lot of fabric at the back on to the elastic to get the waist to fit without gaping due to the fact my waist is 2 sizes smaller than my hips. I purposefully cut the elastic shorter in the back to eliminate the gaping.

I added 2 inches to the rise at the front and back to get the waistband to hit at my natural waist.

I narrowed the leg by about 3 inches total in front and 2 inches total in back.

I removed 2 inches from the leg length.

I added additional topstitching on the pocket and inner leg seam and also added rivets.

I used the (larger) pockets from my Ginger Jeans pattern rather than the ones provided.

I turned 5/8ths inch over twice to hem.

Next time round I think I will shorten the length of the leg above the knee (and add it back at the ankle?), slim the inner thighs down, raise the crotch slightly and possibly move the pockets down a smidge.

Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?

Yes, definitely, although it is all a question of finding the perfect fabric. Sigh. Yes, I definitely recommend.

Conclusion:

Fast to sew, convincing to look at and comfortable to wear.

Have a great weekend. Looks like we are in for another wet and windy one!

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Jalie Eleonore Pull on Jeans: DIY Mustard Jeggings worn with Grainline Archer Shirt

 

Grainline Studio Archer Button Up Shirt (2): DIY Blue Denim Shirt

Grainline Archer Shirt in Denim

Grainline Archer Shirt in Denim

Hi-di-hi Readers,

I braved the elements today and took photos outside of my latest make. Yep, my second Grainline Archer shirt (first one here). This is one of those rare patterns for me that I can just see in so many different guises. I want to do a more summery one next.

Grainline Archer Shirt in Denim

Grainline Archer Shirt in Denim

This second version is made from 8oz light blue denim. It has a good weight to it, but is not bottom weight. It will be the perfect tran-seasonal piece as we head into spring (sometime….?!) It keeps the cold at bay, but without overheating, and the lighter colour is great for this time of year. I also think that every woman should have a denim shirt in her wardrobe. It is a classic that you will wear for years to come.

I really, really wanted to put pearl snaps on the front of the shirt, but I did a trial, and not only did the snaps crack whilst I was trying to put them in, but the denim was just a bit too thick for the pearl snap to stay securely in place. So I went instead for these metal buttons. As with my first shirt, I omitted the breast pocket…I just don’t think I need anything else in that area right now!

Grainline Archer Shirt in Denim

Grainline Archer Shirt in Denim

I flat felled seamed the insides so they look nice and neat. I WISH I had added extra seam allowance on to the top of the sleeve piece and the sides of the front pieces to allow me to do the flat fell seaming more comfortably. I mean, I did it….but it would have been so much easier if I had added to the seam allowance to allow for this slightly thicker fabric.

Grainline Archer Shirt in Denim - flat fell seams inside

Grainline Archer Shirt in Denim – flat fell seams inside

Grainline Archer Shirt in Denim - back

Grainline Archer Shirt in Denim – back

So that’s it for today. What about you? What are you planning on sewing as we wait for spring to properly arrive?

Have a great week ahead.

Grainline Archer Shirt in Denim

Grainline Archer Shirt in Denim

Grainline Archer Shirts

Grainline Archer Shirts…just playing with some effects 🙂

 

Grainline Studio Archer Button Up Shirt: DIY plaid flannel shirt

Plaid Flannel Archer Button Up Shirt

Plaid Flannel Archer Button Up Shirt

Hello Readers, hope you are all well. I have finally got round to making an Archer shirt! I have read sooooo many great reviews about this shirt that I just had to see what all the hype was about. Let me tell you, it does not disappoint.

Plaid Flannel Archer Button Up Shirt

Plaid Flannel Archer Button Up Shirt

I made my Archer in a soft flannel (which from these pictures would appear to wrinkle easily!) This shirt is designed to be loosely fitting, and it is. I like the relaxed fit, but next time round I think I would perhaps narrow the sleeves and cuffs down. I did take the precaution of shortening the sleeves by 3.5 inches before cutting the fabric. I used a tip from Beth (having admired her plaid shirt) and used a softer fusible interfacing to give a softer feel to the shirt.

Plaid Flannel Archer Button Up Shirt

Plaid Flannel Archer Button Up Shirt

I used the same plaid matching techniques as described in this post, again cutting the yoke on the bias. I think I have conquered my fear of matching plaids 🙂 I also chose to flat fell seam all my seam allowances. Speaking of which, I somehow managed to sew BOTH my shirt sleeves on inside out, AND flat fell seam them (on the outside) before I realised and unpicking them (after trimming seam allowances) was hideous, but I managed and somehow got them back on the right way and flat fell seamed…again.

Plaid Flannel Archer Button Up Shirt

Plaid Flannel Archer Button Up Shirt

I would not say this is a beginners project. It does require a lot of very precise sewing. BUT, I have to say that the sewalong accompanying this shirt on the Grainline blog is superb. Jen’s instructions are extremely clear and so are her photographs/ videos. I have previously used the Craftsy Classic Tailored Shirt tutorials to learn about shirt making, and I do still highly recommend them. But I still learned some new tricks using the Archer sewalong which I will carry forward into my future shirt making.

Plaid Flannel Archer Button Up Shirt

Plaid Flannel Archer Button Up Shirt

Pattern Review

Pattern Description:

The Archer Button Up is a loosely fitting button up shirt with long sleeves. View A has angled cuffs and a back pleat at yoke. View B has straight cuffs and a gathered lower back detail.

 
Pattern Sizing:

0 – 18

Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?

Yes.

Were the instructions easy to follow?

I didn’t use the downloaded instructions at all. I just used the Archer sewalong (which is excellent!) and some of my own shirt making knowledge.

What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?

I love the overall fit. It is loose and relaxed. I love the proportions of the collar. I love the fact this is such a versatile pattern (haven’t we already seen so many amazing different versions?!) I think I need to narrow the sleeves for next time.

Fabric Used:

Cotton flannel.

Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:

Aside from shortening the sleeves by 3.5 inches and cutting the yoke on the bias, none.

Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?

YES and YES.

Conclusion:

If you are looking for a casual, feminine shirt with some great features then try this pattern.

Plaid Flannel Archer Button Up Shirt

Plaid Flannel Archer Button Up Shirt

Until later my friends, have a great week.

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