Tag Archive | McCalls 6886

Vogue 8882 and McCalls 6886 (modified): DIY Custom Printed Satin Full Skirt and Cropped Fitted Sweater

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Vogue 8882 custom printed satin skirt worn with McCalls 6886 (modified) cropped fitted sweater

Hello Friends,

A little while ago I was contacted by a new to me company called Fashion Formula, who offer a custom digital printing service onto fabrics, wallpaper, gift wrap, cushions, aprons and tea towels. This was a completely new experience for me, and I am very grateful to Fashion Formula for allowing me to select a fabric and print of my choice for this project. The fabric was provided at no cost to me, but as ever, the opinions expressed in this review are my own.

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Vogue 8882 custom printed satin skirt worn with McCalls 6886 (modified) cropped fitted sweater

Initially, I did toy with the idea of uploading a design of my own creation, using one of my watercolour paintings. But, I really wasn’t confident about getting the repeat on the fabric right, so in the end I perused their almost 1,500 fabric designs and selected this one, Asian Inspiration, by Botal. There are some stunning designs to choose from (already, since I selected I can see there are new designs which I love), and the only thing I would say you need to be wary of, if you are selecting a print for garment fabric, is check the scale of the design (all information is provided on the website), and make sure you are happy with that aspect. The website itself is well designed and easy to navigate and you are provided with a preview of the length of fabric you require so you get to see how the print falls across the entire length.

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Vogue 8882 custom printed satin skirt worn with McCalls 6886 (modified) cropped fitted sweater

There are more than 40 different fabric options to print onto, including, twill, denim, velvet, scuba, poplin, sateen, bamboo, chiffon, organza, ITY jersey, various crepes, georgette, lining fabrics and organic cotton panama. Again, some of these options were introduced after I made my selection, but in the end, I decided to go for heavy satin. Why? I had a vision of making a skirt using Vogue 8882 which I had in my stash, and I have never come across heavy printed satin to purchase before. I can confirm that this fabric went through a hot 60 degree pre-wash and the colours did not fade or streak and the fabric was easy to cut, sew and press. Overall, I am really happy with my experience of using Fashion Formula and I would definitely consider using them again.

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Vogue 8882 custom printed satin skirt worn with McCalls 6886 (modified) cropped fitted sweater

On to the pattern review! First I will say I made the top using McCalls 6886 and an acrylic sweater knit. You can see my previous versions of this pattern here, here and here.

The details:

  • Cut a size 14 (2 sizes smaller than usual)
  • Did a 0.5 inch FBA, rotating the dart back into the side seam
  • Cut off at the waist and added a 4 inch deep waistband
  • Cut off just below the elbow and added a 3 inch deep band
  • Added a neckband
  • Removed 0.25 inches from length at back before adding waistband

Initially, when I tried the sweater on, I really wasn’t too comfortable with how close fitting it is. But, after a lot of Instagram support, I have decided I do actually like it, and I wore it all day yesterday with a denim skirt.

Vogue 8882 Pattern Review

The main review is below, but I just wanted to point out the major issue I had with this skirt, which was in relation to the hemming. So, at least for view B, pattern pieces are included for you to cut nice deep hem facings, which are interfaced. The suggested hem interfacings are crinoline (like finding hens teeth in these parts) or buckram (duly ordered). I have used horse hair braid before very successfully (see here), and given the choice, if making this skirt again, I would probably use the horse hair braid. But, I followed the Vogue instructions and, boy, what a mess the buckram made! You can see the mess here. In the end, I cut the hot mess right off, and used a satin bias binding facing to finish the hem. It was neat and easy to do. I have since found out that buckram is usally only recommended for bag making etc. Why Vogue recommend it is beyond me, unless it comes in different weights?

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Vogue 8882 custom printed satin skirt – satin bias tape facing hem finish

Pattern Description:
Flared skirt (cut on crosswise grain) has waistband, pleats and back zipper. A, B, D: Interfaced hemline. C: Contrast waistband. D: Attached tie ends. E: High-low hemline, wrong side shows. C, E, F: Narrow hem.

I made view B.

Note that this skirt is cut on the cross grain.
Pattern Sizing:
6 – 22
Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?
Yes.
Were the instructions easy to follow?
Yes. I DID NOT like the suggestion to use buckram for the hem interfacing – see below.
What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?
I actually really do like the finished skirt shape. I think it’s quite easy to wear and flattering. I REALLY DISLIKE the suggestion to use buckram as the hem interfacing.

So, at least for view B, pattern pieces are included for you to cut nice deep hem facings, which are interfaced. The suggested hem interfacings are crinoline (like finding hens teeth in these parts) or buckram (duly ordered). I have used horse hair braid before very successfully, and given the choice, if making this skirt again, I would probably use the horse hair braid. But, I followed the Vogue instructions and, boy, what a mess the buckram made! You can see the mess here. In the end, I cut the hot mess right off, and used a satin bias binding facing to finish the hem. It was neat and easy to do.
Fabric Used:
A custom printed heavy satin from Fashion Formula, based in the UK.
Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:
Absolutely no alterations made. If I was making this skirt again I would reduce the height of the waistband by about 5/8ths inch – it’s a little too high for me. I did substitute an invisible zip in as the back closure.
Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?
I might sew it again. I do recommend – its a pretty easy sew – just don’t go near the buckram.
Conclusion:
I am glad to have this skirt in my closet because I think I can dress it up or down and it’s a perfect colour for spring.

At the beginning of May, after a career break of 5 years, I am returning to my former job as a project manager in the field of Animal Health Pharmaceuticals (3 days a week). So, blogging and sewing may slow down somewhat, and perhaps, stylewise, I may sew different things? Who knows. What I do know is I am too addicted to sewing to give up altogether. Here’s looking forward to a new phase in life! Happy Easter and happy sewing.

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Vogue 8882 custom printed satin skirt worn with McCalls 6886 (modified) cropped fitted sweater

 

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Simplicity 1167: DIY Boyfriend Style Chino Trousers Pants

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Simplicity 1167: DIY boyfriend style chino trousers/ pants worn with McCalls 6886 breton top

Hi Friends,

Today I am sharing my latest make with you, a new style for me, what I am calling boyfriend style chino trousers/ pants, made using Simplicity 1167 (another Mimi G Style pattern).

I have been wanting to get away from wearing skinny jeans/ jeggings as much as I do. It has been a verrrrry long time since I wore proper trousers (like maybe more than 4 years!) Since I gave up working I don’t feel the need to wear smart trousers on a daily basis. But this here is my first foray into sewing “proper trousers”.

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Simplicity 1167: DIY boyfriend style chino trousers/ pants worn with McCalls 6886 breton top

Let’s talk about how my trousers compare to the picture on the pattern envelope shall we?

The ones on the pattern envelope look like they are made from ponte knit (the fabric recommendations for this pattern are stretch wovens only), and they are very fitted. The side seam looks skewed forward to me, almost as if the trousers were taken in along the side seams to get a closer fit? I didn’t want such a close fit, but what I will say is that I ended up having to remove a total of 2 inches from the outer seams of my version and they are still no where near as fitted as the pattern envelope ones are. Just saying. BTW, mine are made up in a stretch cotton sateen.

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Simplicity 1167: DIY boyfriend style chino trousers/ pants worn with McCalls 6886 breton top

The main adjustments that I made to this pattern were to do a full butt adjustment and to curve my waistband more to account for my swayback and eliminate a huge amount of waistband gaping. To do the full butt adjustment I used a combination of the tutorials from By Hand London and Colette Patterns. This raised the back height up by 1.25 inches. I would say that these are a mid rise trouser, and this is something I need to get used to again (lately I have been all about the high rise). This is a picture of my adjusted pattern – sorry the adjustment is not that obvious to see.

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Simplicity 1167: DIY boyfriend style chino trousers/ pants – full butt adjustment to back pattern piece

Heather describes how to curve a waistband here. From the picture below you might just be able to see I ended up making 4 “hinges” in the upper waistband, overlapping each hinge by 0.5 inches to effectively remove a total of 2 inches from my upper waistband. The blue waistband underneath is the original left waistband I cut which I ended up discarding and re-cutting using the modified pattern piece. (I did the same on the RHS waistband so I removed a total of 4 inches from the upper waistband in all).

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Simplicity 1167: DIY boyfriend style chino trousers/ pants – waistband alteration to eliminate gaping

Here’s a back view – note that I added welt pockets using this amazing tutorial from Nicole at home which also provides downloadable pattern pieces. This is the first time I have done welt pockets and whilst they are perfectly secure and functioning, let’s just say there is certainly room for improvement. Also, can I just say that no matter how many times I post a back view of a garment it never becomes any easier for me to see that view! But, you know, because I want you to see a complete view of the garment I do it.

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Simplicity 1167: DIY boyfriend style chino trousers/ pants

As ever, full review below. I had these trousers on all day yesterday and love the ease and comfort of wearing them, and combined with the smart fabric I think they tick that smart casual look I strive for on a daily basis. I think they will look better with slightly shorter tops than the ones I would typically wear with my skinny jeans though, which means sewing some new tops – if I really think this new trouser shape is a keeper. I do have another length of khaki/ olive stretch sateen. I am tempted now I have got these to fit to make a second pair, perhaps slightly longer. Do you think I should slim them down some, or should I just try another pattern?

Pattern review

Pattern Description:
Mimi G Style sportswear pattern for Misses includes great jacket, slim pants or shorts with fly-front and carriers in stretch wovens, and knit tank top.

I made view B.
Pattern Sizing:
6 – 24
Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?
Mmmm…I would say mine look more relaxed fit.
Were the instructions easy to follow?
Yep
What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?
Likes:

I do like the finished trousers very much. They are very easy to sew. Separate pieces are included in the pattern envelope for view C (the shorts), and you are not just expected to shorten view B (the trousers), which I thought was a nice touch. The pattern includes facing pieces for the pocket to cut down on bulk which I thought was a great idea. The zipper instructions were good.

Dislikes:

I think the pattern picture is slightly misleading. In the pattern picture the side leg seam looks skewed forward almost as if the seam has been taken in IMO to achieve the closer fit. I ended up removing a total of 2 inches from the outer seam of my version and they are still no where near as fitted as the pattern envelope. I am undecided whether to slim my legs down further or not.
Fabric Used:
Stretch cotton sateen
Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:

I did a full butt adjustment which added 1.25 inches to the back height.

I added 5/8ths inch to the height of the left and right waistband.

I curved my waistband to account for my swayback, removing a total of 2 inches from the left and 2 inches from the right hand side waistband.

I removed a total of 2 inches from the outer seam of my trousers, and have already adjusted the pattern to remove 0.5 inches from the inner and outer seam of both front and back legs next time.

Added back welt pockets.

I ended up cutting too much off my trouser legs! So I added cuffs to the bottom because I wanted the cuffed look.
Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?

Now that I have got the fit I think I should sew them again. But things I need to think about:

 

  • Should I slim the legs down further?
  • Can I get used to the mid rise?
  • Do I need to sew some tops to go with these trousers which are not as long as those I tend to wear with my skinny jeans?

I recommend in that these are an easy sew with great results but, as with any trouser/ pants pattern, be prepared to spend time perfecting the fit!
Conclusion:

 

I love this version because they are so comfortable and yet still look smart.

Now that I have got this pattern to fit I would like to make a second pair (I have a length of khaki/olive stretch cotton sateen in my stash, and I am thinking a slightly longer pair, perhaps minus the cuffs), but I think I will wear these a couple more times before I decide.

What do you think? See you soon!

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Simplicity 1167: DIY boyfriend style chino trousers/ pants worn with McCalls 6886 breton top

 

McCalls 7248, Butterick 6179, Jalie 3461 Eleonore Jeans and McCalls 6886: DIY animal print top, culottes, jeggings and breton top

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McCalls 7248 animal print tunic top and Butterick 6179 triple crepe culottes

Hello Readers!

Today is a bit of a bumper post containing the next 4 items that I sewed up for the wardrobe contest currently running on PR.com. The first thing I have to say is that I am about to cut out item number 7, but I have made a decision that I am not going to rush to complete the remaining 4 items by the end of the month. I am absolutely fine with that, and it is the right decision for me. I have no regrets with what I have sewn up for the contest so far and will still go on to probably sew the remaining garments in my own good time.

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McCalls 7248 animal print tunic top and Butterick 6179 triple crepe culottes

So first up is Butterick 6179, first sewn here. This version is made in a triple crepe and the only alteration I made was to shorten this version by 2 inches compared to the first version. I LOVE these culottes…I know they are not everyones cup of tea…but I just love how I feel when I wear them. Classy, elegant, sophisticated and on trend. Nothing more to say about these.

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McCalls 7248 animal print tunic top and Butterick 6179 triple crepe culottes

The top…now that’s a whole other matter, LOL. The top is McCalls 7248. I had such high hopes for this top, especially after seeing Amanda’s gorgeous version, and really I guess I was hoping this version (made in a polyester georgette) would be a wearable muslin. And it kind of almost is. But, you see, I made a decision to raise the neckline split by 1 inch and I think that 1 little inch has thrown the fit of the whole top off. You can probably see in the pictures it is pulling over the top of my bust from the neckline split.

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McCalls 7248 animal print tunic top and Butterick 6179 triple crepe culottes

If you follow me on instagram you would have seen I initially attached one of the sleeves and it just felt tight right across the tops of the arms and across the back. So I took the sleeve off and added a self bias facing at the armholes and kept it sleeveless. The fit of this top is not perfect and I really don’t know if it is simply down to that 1 inch or something else. I did do an FBA on the pattern and added bust darts before sewing…even in this sleeveless version the armholes are snug (but wearable). Any thoughts? Here’s some pictures of it untucked (I would never wear it like this with the culottes BTW!)…and my review follows.

 

Pattern Review

Pattern Description:

Loose-fitting, pullover tops have front band and pleat, back pleat, Self-lined yoke, and narrow hem. A and B: Bias neck binding and gathers. B, C (button tab) and D: Long sleeves with continuous lap, pleats and button cuffs. Wrong side shows on rolled sleeves C, and longer back hemline B and D. C and D: Neck band.

I made view B with the sleeve tabs from View C and the hem from View D.

Pattern Sizing:

6 – 22

Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?

Erm…kind of. My version is sleeveless.

Were the instructions easy to follow?

For the most part, yes. I did NOT like the instructions for the neck band and did my own thing! First off you are told to staystich the neckline at 0.5 inches from the raw edge, but the neck band is sewn on using a 3/8 inch seam allowance, which means the stay stitching is visible (and therefore had to be unpicked). Secondly, if you follow the instructions fot the neck band I think the pattern has you treat the neck band almost like a bias facing? I didn’t get that. I wanted my neck band to be more visible so I turned the inside edge under and slip stitched it closed.

What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?

See above for a dislike. The fit of my top is off and the main reason I think is due to the fact I raised the neckline slit depth by 1 inch. It seems to have thrown the fit of the whole top off. There are pull lines radiating out from the neckline slit over the top of my bust. Initially I had a sleeve on and it felt tight across the tops of the arms and across the back. I ended up taking the sleeve off and adding a self bias facing to finish the armholes off. I don’t know if dropping the depth back down again will alleviate these problems. Even in this sleeveless version the armholes feel snug.

Fabric Used:

Polyester georgette with animal print.

Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:

Reduced sleeve length by 0.5 inch.

0.5 inch sway back adjustment.

Raised depth of neckline slit by 1 inch (including shortening pattern piece number 2 – front band – by `1 inch).

1 inch FBA, adding in side bust dart.

I interfaced the neck band using a tricot interfacing.

Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?

I don’t know. I think on a smaller busted person this would be a great top.

Conclusion:

Disappointed but that’s the nature of the sewing beast. I will probably still wear this top. When I get over it maybe I will look at this pattern again…or just move on (more likely).

 

Ok, so next we have Jalie 3461 Eleonore pull-on jeans. First time sewn here.

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Jalie 3461 Eleonore jeans and McCalls 6886 modified to breton top

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Jalie 3461 Eleonore jeans and McCalls 6886 modified to breton top

This version is made in 10 oz cotton denim with 2% elastane and they fit and feel much better than the first pair. Changes made:

  • Moved back pocket position down by 0.25 inches
  • Shortened length of leg above knee by 1  inch
  • Slimmed inner thigh down by 0.25 inch
  • Raised crotch by 0.25 inch
  • Reduced rise by 1 inch
  • Reduced depth of waistband by 0.5 inch
  • Lengthened at calf by 3 inches (I like the wrinkled ankle look)
  • I cut the back elastic 1 inch shorter than the front. For the next pair I would make this more like 1.5 inches shorter.

Overall I love them. Very flattering (I think) and I have worn them all day and the denim has not bagged out at all. I have made another pair…next time!

Finally I made a top length version of McCalls 6886 using a striped ponte knit. I added 5/8 inch seam allowance below the bust (could perhaps have even added on a little more for a looser fit?), made the sleeves 3/4 length and added side slits. The neckline is finished using a chambray bias facing. Very neat.

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Jalie 3461 Eleonore jeans and McCalls 6886 modified to breton top

 

Phew! Ok. So, that’s me for today. Where is this year flying away too? Have a great weekend. Until soon…

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Jalie 3461 Eleonore jeans and McCalls 6886 modified to breton top

 

McCalls 6886: DIY Floral Print Pull On Jersey Dress

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McCalls 6886: DIY Floral Print Pull On Jersey Dress

Hey Readers,

Hope you all had a fantastic, peaceful and joyous christmas. I had a lovely time with my family, eating lots, playing games and watching Kezia opening her presents.

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McCalls 6886: DIY Floral Print Pull On Jersey Dress

This here is my second version of McCalls 6886. I have been wearing my first version quite a bit because it is so easy to throw on, is comfortable and warm. After my velvet dresses didn’t quite work out, I decided on christmas eve morning to sew this version up (got to have a new dress for christmas!) The (stash) fabric, from what I can recall, was described as a (probably) poly waffle textured jersey.

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McCalls 6886: DIY Floral Print Pull On Jersey Dress

You can read my review for this pattern here. The only thing I did differently this time was to cut my true size (last time I sized down by 2 inches because the sweater knit had a lot of stretch). I didn’t want to go too tight with this fabric because it tends to show white when stretched.

So that’s it: super fast and easy and so easy to wear. Will I make another one? Maybe. But I think I want a more complex project next: something to sink my teeth into. What about you? What’s on your sewing plans?

Thanks to everyone to who continues to read my blog and leave comments. Here’s wishing you all a wonderful healthy, prosperous and happy New Year!

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McCalls 6886: DIY Floral Print Pull On Jersey Dress

 

 

McCalls 6886 and Muse Patterns Jenna Cardi: DIY Sweater Knit Dress and Cardigan

McCalls 6886: DIY Sweater Knit Dress

McCalls 6886: DIY Sweater Knit Dress

Hi Friends,

PatternReview.com is having a Sweater Knit Contest, which closes today. You can check out all the entries here. I ordered a couple of sweater knits a few weeks back and this contest was the motivation I needed to get them sewn up.

McCalls 6886: DIY Sweater Knit Dress

McCalls 6886: DIY Sweater Knit Dress

First up I used some 70% merino lambs wool, 30% acrylic sweater knit to make a version of McCalls 6886. This sweater knit is quite a good (heavy) weight, and with a lot of stretch. To determine which size to make I followed some advice recently offered by Beth, who advised measuring out knit fabric to the size stated on the finished pattern measurements and wrapping it around your body to determine what size to sew. I ended up sizing down by two sizes to compensate for the stretch in this knit.

Full review below, but general conclusion is that I like this dress. It feels lovely and warm and is very easy to throw on over tights and boots. The one thing I am not 100% happy with is that my hems have got a bit of that wavy look to them. I should say that for both the garments shown in this post I sewed all the seams using my lightening bolt stitch on my regular sewing machine, and finished all seams on my overlocker. I did test on samples first for the hemming of this dress and it looked fine, but the actual hems have gone a bit wavy. So perhaps I should have interfaced them?

McCalls 6886: DIY Sweater Knit Dress

McCalls 6886: DIY Sweater Knit Dress

Pattern Review

Pattern Description:

Close-fitting, pullover dresses have neckline variations, and stitched hems. E and F: neck bands.

I made view A with the sleeves from view C.

Pattern Sizing:

6 – 22

Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?

Yes.

Were the instructions easy to follow?

Yes, although I set my sleeves in flat and then sewed up the side seams. (Seriously McCalls: why do you keep telling us to set in sleeves in knit garments in the round? Is there some reason for this?)

What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?

This is such a popular pattern and I can see why. It is easy to sew, quick to make and very easy to wear. Nothing to dislike really.

Fabric Used:

70% merino lambs wool, 30% acrylic sweater knit.

Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:

I ended up sizing down 2 sizes to compensate for the stretch in this fabric, but took only 3/8th inch below the bust at the side seams.

I added one inch to the length (of view A).

I added 1 inch to the sleeves (of view C).

I did a 1 inch sway back adjustment.

I added clear elastic to stabilise the shoulders and prevent stretching out.

I set the sleeves in flat.

I turned and stitched all hemlines (taking only 5/8th inch for all; I wish I had interfaced the skirt and sleeve hems).
Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?

Yes and yes.

Conclusion:

At time of writing 73 other reviewers on PR.Com can’t be wrong: this is one pattern to definitely have in your stash.

McCalls 6886: DIY Sweater Knit Dress

McCalls 6886: DIY Sweater Knit Dress

Next I used some french navy knitted jersey (75% lambs wool, 25% acrylic microfiber jersey) to make a Jenna Cardigan by Muse Patterns. (Sorry, but this fabric was purchased from the same ebay seller above and they seem to have sold out now). Again, this is a very popular pattern on the internet, and I can see why. I LOVE how great this looks.

Muse Patterns Jenna Cardigan: DIY Sweater Knit Cardigan

Muse Patterns Jenna Cardigan: DIY Sweater Knit Cardigan (worn with Archer shirt)

In case anyone is wondering, I have lengthened this cardigan by 4 inches to get a more relaxed boyfriend style (i.e. bum coverage). I have a RTW cardigan like this and based the measurements off that. Again, full review below but I will definitely make this pattern again…if I can find the right fabric.

Muse Patterns Jenna Cardigan: DIY Sweater Knit Cardigan

Muse Patterns Jenna Cardigan: DIY Sweater Knit Cardigan

Pattern Review

Pattern Description:

Jenna is a fitted, round neck, button-up cardigan with two length options (hip or waist length), three sleeve options (long, 3/4, or short), and optional shoulder yoke detailing.
Pattern Sizing:

Bust 32″ – 48″

Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?

Yes, but I lengthened this particular version.

Were the instructions easy to follow?

Yes.

What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?

I LOVE the finished garment: it looks so RTW. There is not much to dislike…but I would have liked to have had lengthen/ shorten lines on the pattern and there is no grainline marked on the front piece.

Fabric Used:

French navy knitted jersey (75% lambs wool, 25% acrylic microfiber jersey)

Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:

Ended up removing a total of 3 inches from the length of the sleeves.

Narrowed sleeves by approx. total 1 inch below the elbow.

Lengthened body of cardigan by 4 inches (and button band; added an extra button to compensate for extra length).

Approx. 0.5 inch sway back adjustment.

I added clear elastic to stabilise the shoulders and prevent stretching out.

Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?

YES and YES.

Conclusion:

The only thing stopping me from making more of these cardigans is finding the right fabric. The search commences….

Are we at November already?! Where is the time flying too? Happy sewing!

Muse Patterns Jenna Cardigan: DIY Sweater Knit Cardigan

Muse Patterns Jenna Cardigan: DIY Sweater Knit Cardigan (worn with Archer Shirt)

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